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Arisaema consanguineum 'Siren's Song'


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Arisaema consanguineum 'Siren's Song'

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Description

(Himalayan Cobra Lily) Siren's Song is tall, but a bit shorter than the Poseidon cultivar of this woodland species. We offer you well-established clumps that will reward you by blooming the first year that you plant them.

The spathe of Siren's Song is a leaf-like blossom that wraps around and hangs over the plant's finger-like spadix with its tip coming to a long, thin point. It looks a bit like a cobra hissing. Its blue-green, radial leaves, are wide and wavy. They spread out like spokes at the top of the plant's stalk and have wide silver stripes down the center of each blade. Give this plant full sun to partial shade and rich, well-drained soil.

Most Arisaemas are from Asia where they are known as Cobra Lilies. Arisaema consanguineum is native to lowlands as well as alpine areas in China, India, Taiwan, Thailand and Tibet. North American species are commonly called Jack in the Pulpit.

Plantswoman Ellen Hornig, who is particularly renowned for the Arisaemas she grew at the former Seneca Hill Perennials nursery in Ithaca, New York, bred this excellent cultivar. It grows well in full sun to partial shade and survives chilly winters.

Arisaemas are used medically in herbal formulas, but should be carefully processed for safe consumption.

Details

Product rating
 
(2 reviews)  

In stock
2 item(s) available

Common name  
Himalayan Cobra Lily
USDA Zones  
5 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)  
36"/36"/48"
Exposure  
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type  
Rich and well drained
Water needs  
Ample
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
17.00


Options

Quantity (2 available)




Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

5 - 11
5 - 11
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
36 inches wide
36 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant
  • Arisaema consanguineum 'Poseidon'

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) As its name implies, Poseidon is a tall, commanding Arisaema. We offer you a well-established clump that will reward you by blooming the first year that you plant it.

    Poseidon's spathe is deep green and purple. It is a leaf-like blossom that wraps around and hangs over the finger-like spadix with its tip coming to a long, thin point. It looks a bit like a cobra hissing. Its blue-green, radial leaves spread out like spokes at the top of the plant's stalk -- called a psuedostem -- and have silver stripes down the center of each blade. Give this majestic plant full sun to partial shade and rich, well-drained soil.

    Most Arisaemas are from Asia where they are known as Cobra Lilies. Arisaema consanguineum is native to lowlands as well as alpine areas in China, India, Taiwan, Thailand and Tibet. North American species are commonly called Jack in the Pulpit.

    Plantswoman Ellen Hornig, who is particularly renowned for the Arisaemas she grew at the former Seneca Hill Perennials nursery in Ithaca, New York, bred this excellent cultivar. It grows well in full sun and survives chilly winters.

    Arisaemas are used medically in herbal formulas, but should be carefully processed for safe consumption.

    17.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Arisaema ciliatum

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) Although significantly shorter than Arisaema consanguineum, this woodland species also has radial leaves like the spokes in an umbrella. We offer you well-established clumps that will reward you by blooming the first year you plant them.

    The plant's spathe, which is purple to maroon with cream stripes, is a leaf-like blossom that wraps around and hangs over the plant's greenish, finger-like spadix. Mid-green foliage spreads out at the top of the plant's stalk, which is called a psuedostem.

    Give this plant full sun to partial shade and rich, well-drained soil. It survives chilly winters.

    Most Arisaemas are from Asia where they are known as Cobra Lilies. This one is native to China's Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces. In contrast, North American species of Arisaemas are commonly called Jack in the Pulpit, with the spathe being likened to a lectern.

    Arisaemas are used medically in herbal formulas, but should be carefully processed for safe consumption.

    17.00
    New!
  • Salvia campanulata

    (Campanula Leaf Sage) Spectacular yellow-flowering Salvias are rare, so this one stands out. Its large, almost round leaves form a basal clump that is attractive and tough. Bright yellow flowers arise from the clump on stems up to 48 inches tall.

    This hardy herbaceous perennial comes from the mountains of Central China and is rarely seen in the United States. We highly recommend this moisture-tolerant plant for shady perennial borders and woodland-style gardens.

    12.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia trijuga

    So what do all those Pinyin words mean in this sage’s common name? We’ll give you an answer to the best of our ability in a minute. Meanwhile, we need to note that this medicinal Asian sage has handsome foliage and deep violet flowers.

    The flower spikes bloom from summer to fall, attracting butterflies. This sage loves shade and water. Cold and heat tolerant, it grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9.

    Give it rich, well-drained soil similar to the kind where it is found in the wild. San ye shu wei cao grows along the margins of high-altitude forests that border grassy hillsides in Southwestern China. Its dark green, basal leaves are oval-to-heart shaped with pretty, scalloped margins. The foliage mound rises up 24 to 32 inches and spreads about the same distance.

    Good uses include plantings in moist areas such as woodland gardens. This perennial sage also shows well in borders, along pathways where you can see it up close and as a groundcover.

    Current medical research indicates that chemicals in this plant’s bright red taproots may be effective in battling liver cancer. Similar to many Asian sages, it has a long history of use in herbal remedies. The substances in its roots are used for a variety of medical purposes, including strengthening the immune system, stimulating circulation, soothing the mind, relieving restlessness and improving blood flow to the brain.

    We don’t speak Chinese, but after a bit of searching, we discovered that the phrase ‘shu wei cao’ refers to sage. ‘San’ means ‘three’ and ‘ye’ means leaf. So it’s a three-leafed sage, which means that there are three leaves on each petiole.

    12.50

    OUT OF STOCK

    New!
  • Salvia yunnanensis

    (Yunnan Sage or yun nan shu wei cao) Yunnan Sage's tall spikes of violet-to-purple flowers bloom from summer into fall. Native to Southwestern China's provinces of Yunnan, Guizhou and Sichuan, it grows on shady, grassy hillsides and along forest margins at elevations up to 9,500 feet.

    This is an important medicinal sage in Asia. Its bright red taproots are made into herbal remedies used to strengthen the immune system. Research laboratories are just now identifying the active ingredients, after a millennium of use by the Chinese.

    Yunnan Sage tolerates cold as well as heat. It needs partial to full shade, average to plentiful water and well-drained soil. Plant it in moist areas, woodland gardens, perennial borders and along pathways where you can see it close up.

    Highly recommended!

    15.00

    OUT OF STOCK

Average customer rating:
 
(2 reviews)  



2 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Ms. Sue Mackaness
Jan 6, 2015
My Arisaema consanguineum 'Siren's Song' arrived in a timely manner, well packed and loaded with all sizes of bulbs. I was impressed with both the amount of bulbs and also with the fact that I found no rot on any of them. I can't wait to order more when FBTS gets in more varieties.
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Mr. Keith Portka
Aug 16, 2014
This customer purchased the item at our site.
High quality plants,3 1/2 inch pot was ready to burst.
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I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.