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Best of Class

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Best of Class

Remember in childhood when you received a ribbon for doing a super job on a task or in a competition? It signaled an accomplishment of which others took notice. There are times at Flowers by the Sea when we pause from work and glimpse a plant that is particularly beautiful and reliable. We feel like hanging a colorful county-fair-type ribbon on it to proclaim top achievement. This Best of Class list shares the plants we honor as being winners in many ways. We give them accolades for great garden performance.

Each of our Best of Class plants is marked with a first-place ribbon icon giving a brief explanation of how it is tops. The accolade marks plants that are tops within a specific grouping or species for combinations of characteristics such as adaptability, appearance, cold hardiness, drought resistance, durability, ease of growth, heat tolerance, long bloom time, pest resistance, size and usability in particular circumstances.

Regarding usability, for example, we might recommend one plant as best of class among Salvia groundcovers for dry slopes and another as the best groundcover for damp shade.

This way of identifying fine performers is similar to the kind of “super plant” recommendations that university extension services sometimes offer. We base our Best of Class selections not only on experience with the plants in our gardens but on feedback from customers around the nation. When you call or write to us, we really do pay attention.

Keep in mind that what is best for your garden may not be best in another region with different growing conditions. When selecting plants from our catalog, please read their descriptions carefully to be sure they fit your local climate and any special features of your property. If a Best of Class plant is right for your USDA zone, summer heat, water availability and soil characteristics as well as the size and light level of the planned growing area, then it is one of the best choices you can make.

Plants


  • Acanthus mollis 'Tasmanian Angel'

    (Variegated Bear's Breeches) Found in Tasmania, this gem is the first variegated Acanthus! 'Tasmanian Angel' offers striking, bold leaves with white margins and mottling.

    13.50
     


  • Agastache 'Blue Boa'

    (Blue Boa Hummingbird Mint) Luxurious deep violet-blue flower spikes held over ultra-green foliage. Unlike any other Agastache varieties, the flower spikes are long, wide and extremely showy.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Agastache cana 'Sinning'

    (Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop) An abundance of lavender-rose flowers mark Agastache cana 'Sinning' as being unique from the typical purple-flowered plants of its species. Colorado plantsman Duane Sinning discovered this lovely hybrid.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias eriocarpa

    (Indian Milkweed) It's the hairy, minty green foliage of Asclepias eriocarpa -- not its star-like, pink and cream flowers filled with nectar -- that is most valuable to Monarch butterflies.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias hallii

    (Hall's Milkweed) Although drought resistant, the rare Asclepias hallii prefers moist soil because it is accustomed to the snowmelt of its homelands in the foothills and mountains of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias speciosa

    (Showy Milkweed) Milkweeds (Asclepias spp. ) are must-have, nectar-rich plants in the butterfly garden. They're the only genus on which the endangered Monarch butterfly lays eggs. It is urgent that we offer this pretty, fragrant wildflower.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias syriaca

    (Common Milkweed) Star shaped and creamy pink, the tiny, multitudinous flowers of Asclepias syriaca form globes. These umbels make it easy for butterflies to perch while feeding. The plant's form is attractively vertical.
    10.50
     


  • Asclepias verticillata

    (Whorled Milkweed) Verticillasters are whorl-like clusters of flowers on flower stems. In Asclepias verticillata, which is commonly called Whorled or Horsetail Milkweed, multiple umbels of creamy white, star-shaped blossoms appear to twirl around the floral stems.

    10.50
     


  • Cestrum 'Orange Peel'

    (Orange Peel Jessamine) Mainly fragrant at night, the orange and yellow flowers of Cestrum 'Orange Peel' are the result of a cross between Night-Blooming Cestrum (C. nocturnum) and Day-Blooming Cestrum (C. diurnum).

    10.50
     


  • Deppea splendens

    (Chiapas Golden Fuchsia) Cool, moist and partially shady -- those are the conditions that this tall, rare shrub loves. Once native to the mountain cloud forests of Mexico's southernmost state, Chiapas, Golden Fuchsia in 1986 became extinct in the wild and now is primarily grown by botanical gardens.

    15.00
     


    New!
  • Dicliptera suberecta

    (Uruguayan Firecracker Plant) Mint-green foliage felted with a covering of fine hairs provides a cooling backdrop to the hot orange tubular flowers of this long-blooming member of the acanthus family (Acanthaceae).

    9.00
     


  • Eucomis 'Freckles'

    (Speckled Dwarf Pineapple Lily) The ‘freckles’ on this petite South African plant are the reddish-purple speckles on its long, lance-shaped, olive-green leaves. From summer to fall, short, rose-red flower spikes rise up from the center of this exotic foliage.

    10.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Orange Vanilla Popsicle'

    (Orange Vanilla Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    13.50
     


    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Papaya Popsicle'

    (Papaya Popsicle Hot Poker) Terra Nova Nursery's Popsicle Series of dwarf Hot Poker perennials are reminiscent of the kind of frozen treats designed to look like rocket ships and fireworks. The blossoms of Papaya Popsicle are a bright orange-red and gold.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Orange'

    (Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Orange' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Red'

    (Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Red' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is about two inches shorter than the already petite Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'.

    11.50
     


    This plant can now be ordered
    Preorder yours today, and your plants will be reserved for your selected shipping date.

    Due in stock and ready to ship on May 13, 2017


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow'

    (Poco Yellow Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy. And redhot, by the way.

    11.50
     


    This plant can now be ordered
    Preorder yours today, and your plants will be reserved for your selected shipping date.

    Due in stock and ready to ship on May 13, 2017


  • Lobelia 'Monet Moment'

    (Monet Moment Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Lobelia 'Monet Moment' are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia 'Starship Deep Rose'

    (Starship Deep Rose Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Starship Deep Rose are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia cardinalis 'Queen Victoria'

    (Queen Victoria Cardinal Flower) Calling all butterfly and hummingbird lovers in areas with chilly winters: This one's for you. Lobelias are well known for attracting pollinators. This one is extremely cold tolerant and even does well in the Rocky Mountain West.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

    (Giant Red Cardinal Flower) Similar to the plumage of a Northern Cardinal, the flowers of this Lobelia hybrid are startlingly red. The tubular blossoms have lips that flare at their openings into petals shaped like poinsettia bracts.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia 'Amistad'

    (Friendship Sage) Thank you Rolando Uria of the University of Buenos Aries for this very fine plant. Discovered in 2005 at a plant show in Argentina, this truly unique hybrid sage has generated a great deal of excitement in the Salvia world. We are very excited to be able to offer this plant for the first time in the Spring of 2013.

    10.50
     


    This plant can now be ordered
    Preorder yours today, and your plants will be reserved for your selected shipping date.

    Due in stock and ready to ship on May 13, 2017


    New!
  • Salvia 'Orchid Glow'

    (Orchid Glow Sage) Sages can be such tough plants withstanding heat and drought. Yet so many, including Salvia 'Orchid Glow' have delicate looking blossoms. This one has large, bright magenta flowers with white beelines.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia arborescens

    (Tree Sage)Whether you call it a shrub or a tree, Salvia arborscens rises up to an impressive 12 feet tall and 5 feet wide. Commonly known as Sage Tree, this Salvia grows well in full sun, but prefers partial shade.

    11.50
     


  • Salvia arizonica

    (Arizona Blue Sage) We are so impressed with this top-performing, drought-resistant ground cover that we have rated it best of class. Arizona Blue Sage is adaptable to a variety of shady conditions and blossoms so abundantly that it seems to have as many rich blue flowers as it has leaves. It is native to dry, shaded areas in mountain canyons in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia arizonica 'Deep Blue'

    (Arizona Deep Blue Sage) In contrast to the lavender-blue flowers of Arizona Blue Sage (Salvia arizonica), the blossoms of Arizona Deep Blue are nearly purple. They are the kind of deep lavender that you might see in a southwestern sunset.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia BODACIOUS 'Rhythm and Blues'

    (Rhythm and Blues Anise-Scented Sage)  New for 2017, this variety is a superior version of the older standby 'Black and Blue'.  Easy to grow and rewarding, this hummingbird favorite is our very best Anise Scented Sage.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Salvia buchananii

    (Buchanan's Sage) No longer found in the wild in its native Mexico, this spectacular Salvia is widely grown in courtyards and by entryways throughout the country. Also known as Fuschia Sage, it has long, pendulous, magenta flowers that are fuzzy and framed by purplish, glossy leaves.
    10.50
     


    This plant can now be ordered
    Preorder yours today, and your plants will be reserved for your selected shipping date.

    Due in stock and ready to ship on May 13, 2017


  • Salvia canescens var. daghestanica

    (Caucasus Sage) This hardy ground cover sage grows 4 to 12 inches tall and 12 inches wide. The velvety white fur of its foliage aids moisture retention. Its soft, royal purple flowers make it stand out. We think this Salvia deserves to spread far and wide.

    11.50
     


  • Salvia cardiophylla

    (Heart Leaf Sage) From the rich plains of Northern Argentina comes this delicate looking sage with heart-shaped leaves and pale blue flowers so perfect they seem to be molded in wax. Although a slow grower that requires good garden culture, this Salvia is exquisite.

    15.00
     


  • Salvia carnea

    (Temascaltepec Sage) In full bloom, which is all year in mild climates, this mid-sized Salvia has far more flowers than foliage. Each 1/2-inch-long, bright pink bloom has two dark pink/purple spots and a pair of white stripes. The small, slightly furry leaves add to its soft, pleasing look.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia cinnabarina

    (Cinnabar Sage) Think of this plant as Pineapple Sage on steroids. It grows 5 feet tall and can be twice as wide and bursts with large, intensely red, furry flowers all winter. Our overwintering hummingbirds adore it. This cinnabar-red sage is hard to forget once you see it in full bloom.

    11.50
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'

    (Forest Fire Tropical Sage) Butterflies love the abundant, fire engine red flowers of this mostly annual sage. It's a popular cultivar of one of the first Salvias used for ornamental purposes -- Tropical Sage. The flowers are dramatically framed by reddish black bracts.

    7.00
     




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Reviews


This is a healthy beautiful plant. I have already seen this one in bloom and that is why I ordered it. It is incredibly cute in bloom. I can't wait.
Mrs. Carol Moreno
Mar 30, 2017