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Butterfly Plants

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Butterfly Plants

Butterflies are welcome visitors and essential pollinators in gardens. Their grace and beauty are almost hypnotic. The nectar, pollen and color of Salvias attract butterflies. At night, moths are drawn to their fragrance.

This list contains some of the best sages and companion plants for attracting and feeding butterflies and moths. We also include some non-Salvias that are important host plants for their baby caterpillars.

Please refer to the Sage Words About Wildlife section of our Everything Salvias Blog for more in-depth information about Lepidoptera in your garden.

At Flowers by the Sea, we continue to expand our offerings of Salvias and companion plants for wildlife habitat. Please check regularly check for new catalog listings and feel free to contact us about any questions you may have.

Plants


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Orange'

    (Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Orange' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Red'

    (Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Red' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is about two inches shorter than the already petite Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow'

    (Poco Yellow Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy. And redhot, by the way.

    11.50
     


  • Leonotis leonurus

    (Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) "Leon" is Greek for "lion," whereas "otis" translates as "ear." The appellation "leonurus" equals "lion colored." Actually, we think the tawny orange blossoms of this mint family (Lamiaceae) species look more like a lion's mane.

    10.50
     


  • Leonotis menthifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) Mint Lion's Ear is a drought-tolerant perennial in areas with mild climates and works well as an annual in regions with cold winter temperatures. It is a fine Salvia companion, particularly as a middle-of-border planting that looks magnificent when massed.

    10.50
     


    Special Order Plant
    Special Order Plant   This plant is available by Special Order. Click for more information.
  • Leonotis nepetifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Klipp Dagga) Here's another plant for Dr. Seuss gardens. Mint Lion's Ear produces intermittent, shaggy whorls of fuzzy, rosy orange tubular flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love. The blossoms burst from prickly, round clusters on stems as tall and slender as auto antennas.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia 'Monet Moment'

    (Monet Moment Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Lobelia 'Monet Moment' are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia 'Starship Deep Rose'

    (Starship Deep Rose Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Starship Deep Rose are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia cardinalis 'Queen Victoria'

    (Queen Victoria Cardinal Flower) Calling all butterfly and hummingbird lovers in areas with chilly winters: This one's for you. Lobelias are well known for attracting pollinators. This one is extremely cold tolerant and even does well in the Rocky Mountain West.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia

    (Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the long, scarlet and orange trumpet blossoms of this Lobelia native to the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

    (Giant Red Cardinal Flower) Similar to the plumage of a Northern Cardinal, the flowers of this Lobelia hybrid are startlingly red. The tubular blossoms have lips that flare at their openings into petals shaped like poinsettia bracts.

    10.50
     


  • Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer'

    (Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia) Slender, hot pink trumpet blossoms of Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia dangle from red flower spikes. They hang over variegated foliage that looks like someone sprayed it with lime, forest green and cream accents.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia 'Blue Chiquita'

    (Blue Chiquita Sage)  This unusual and now rare variety was first discovered by the Yucca Do Nursery during their 1997 expedition in Mexico.  Growing into a small, tight mound with silvery-blue leaves, it explodes in the fall with pale blue flowers on tall spikes.

    11.50
     


  • Salvia 'Dancing Dolls'

    (Dancing Dolls Sage) Sages can be such tough plants. Many, such as Salvia 'Dancing Dolls', withstand heat and drought yet have delicate looking blossoms. Dancing Dolls features cream and rose bicolor flowers.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia 'Fancy Dancer'

    (Fancy Dancer Sage) Sages can be such tough plants withstanding heat and drought. Yet so many, including Salvia 'Fancy Dancer' have delicate looking blossoms. This one has bicolor flowers combining light and hot pink tones.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia 'Orchid Glow'

    (Orchid Glow Sage) Sages can be such tough plants withstanding heat and drought. Yet so many, including Salvia 'Orchid Glow' have delicate looking blossoms. This one has large, bright magenta flowers with white beelines.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia amplexicaulis

    (Stem Clasping Violet Sage)  Like a candelabra lit up with whorls of violet blossoms, the erect, branching flower spikes of Salvia amplexicaulis make this native of Southeastern Europe shine. On the Grecian island of Thassos, it brightens areas near the beach.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia apiana x clevelandii 'Vicki Romo'

    (Vicki Romo White Sage) A hybrid two top Californian natives, Vicki Romo has foliage very much like that of White Sage (Salvia apiana) and darker lavender flowers than those of Cleveland Sage (Salvia clevelandii).

    10.50
     


  • Salvia azurea

    (Prairie Sage) Native to a large part of the central United States, this perennial Salvia is a beloved wildflower, delighting us with large cerulean blue flowers. Hummingbirds and butterflies love it as well.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia ballotaeflora

    (Mejorana) In Spanish, Mejorana means ‘marjoram.” Similar to oregano-type Marjoram – another Mint family member -- this sage is used to flavor meat dishes. Our cultivar, which is native to Texas and Mexico, has lovely bluish-purple flowers that bloom summer to fall amid fragrant, fine, furry green foliage.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia cadmica

    (Wand Sage) Whorls of deep violet blossoms are cupped by dark bracts on the flower spikes of this mid-height herbaceous sage from Turkey. Its foliage is thick, corrugated and fragrant. This plant is lovely and hardy, so it is surprising that it wasn’t introduced to commercial cultivation until 2007.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia carnea

    (Temascaltepec Sage) In full bloom, which is all year in mild climates, this mid-sized Salvia has far more flowers than foliage. Each 1/2-inch-long, bright pink bloom has two dark pink/purple spots and a pair of white stripes. The small, slightly furry leaves add to its soft, pleasing look.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia clevelandii 'Alpine'

    (Alpine Cleveland Sage) Powerfully fragrant and incredibly long blooming, Alpine Cleveland Sage is also the cold-hardyest variety of its species, tolerating temperatures well below freezing.
    10.50
     


  • Salvia clevelandii 'Deer Springs Silver'

    (Silver Cleveland Sage or California Silver-Blue Sage) Unlike other Cleveland Sages, this drought-tolerant, violet-flowered evergreen blooms in summer. This compact, aromatic shrub has distinctive silver-grey foliage. It was discovered in Northern San Diego County.
    10.50
     


  • Salvia clevelandii 'Whirly Blue'

    (Cleveland Sage or California Blue Sage) A California native plant garden is not complete without a Cleveland Sage. This particular cultivar has deeper blue flowers with a purple overlay as well as deep purple calyxes. Due to its height and drought resistance, it is ideal for back of border in a dry garden or for use as a screen.

    10.50
     


  • Salvia clevelandii 'Winnifred Gilman'

    (Cleveland Sage or California Blue Sage) This drought-tolerant, evergreen, California native is a compact, aromatic shrub with electric blue-purple flowers that bloom in summer. Discovered in a Berkeley, California, garden, Winnifred Gilman is a fine variety of the species.
    10.50
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Coral Nymph'

    (Coral Nymph Tropical Sage) What a cutie! This award-winning cultivar of Tropical Sage is short and compact yet has a multitude of pastel salmon flowers larger than those of its bigger cousins. It is perfect for annual flower beds or patio containers.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'

    (Forest Fire Tropical Sage) Butterflies love the abundant, fire engine red flowers of this mostly annual sage. It's a popular cultivar of one of the first Salvias used for ornamental purposes -- Tropical Sage. The flowers are dramatically framed by reddish black bracts.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Lady in Red'

    (Lady in Red Tropical Sage) Lady in Red is a variety of Salvia coccinea Juss. ex Murray, which is often called Texas Sage. It is the best red-flowering Tropical Sage that we grow.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Snow Nymph'

    (Snow Nymph White Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this award winner, which is an outstanding choice for pure white color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Lavender'

    (Summer Jewel Lavender Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this All American 2016 winner, which is an outstanding choice for dusty lavender purple color from June to autumn. The Summer Jewel varieties of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    7.00
     


    New!
  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Pink'

    (Summer Jewel Pink Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner, which is an outstanding choice for bright pink & white color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Red'

    (Summer Jewel Red Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner, which is an outstanding choice for bright red color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    7.00
     


  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel White'

    (Summer Jewel White Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this All American 2016 winner, which is an outstanding choice for pure white color from June to autumn. The Summer Jewel varieties of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    7.00
     


    New!
  • Salvia coccinea 'Vermilion'

    (VermilionTropical Sage) Tall and full of large, orange flowers, Salvia coccinea 'Vermilion' is a strain from the Lousiana gardens of hummingbird guru Nancy Newfield.

    8.00
     




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Reviews


Blooms pretty continuously from late spring through fall, planted in full sun wit 45 minutes of drip every 5 days in summer. Attracts various pollinators.
Mary Smith
Aug 12, 2017