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Chinese Natives

Chinese Natives

The mountains of Southern and Central China are rich in plant species, with new ones regularly being introduced to horticulture. Most Chinese Salvias are cold hardy herbaceous perennials; a number are heat tolerant as well. They thrive in partial shade, such as woodland gardens and locations with morning sun and afternoon shade. Some grow well in full shade.

Many of these sages are the subjects of modern medical research, because the Chinese have used them in herbal remedies for millennia. All the ones we grow and list here are reliable and beautiful.

Products


Inventory Levels to Increase

We're currently growing more of all these favorites and will have plenty available for ordering as the season progresses. Need to plant in April or May? We'll be ready for you.

  • Salvia bowleyana

    (Nan dan shen) Lavender and pearly white blossoms shaped like parrot beaks are supported by burgundy and green calyxes on this cold-tolerant plant from Southern China. In summer, the flowers grow in whorl-like clusters on spikes reaching up to 5 feet tall above large, fuzzy, pinnate, olive-green leaves.

    $16.00
     

  • Salvia campanulata

    (Campanula Leaf Sage) Spectacular yellow-flowering Salvias are rare, so this one stands out. Its large, almost round leaves form a basal clump that is attractive and tough. Bright yellow flowers arise from the clump on stems up to 48 inches tall.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia chinensis 'Nanjinga'

    (Chinese Sage) Although this is a perennial species, most people in the U.S. who are familiar with Chinese Sage, probably know the annual variety Salvia chinensis . The perennial form is reliable; we’ve grown it for several years. However, little has been written about it.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia deserta

    (xin jiang shu wei cao) Long, branched spikes of purple flowers with purple-red bracts are one of the ornamental attractions of Salvia deserta, which grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9. However, it is also well known as a medicinal sage in its Asian homelands.
    $9.50
     

  • Salvia dolichantha

    (Purple Szechuan Sage or chang hua shu di cao) Rich violet flowers seem to hover in the air above this hardy, shade-loving, herbaceous perennial from the mountains of Szechuan, China. They bloom from late summer through fall on branched spikes rising up to 5 feet long from clumping foliage.
    $12.50
     

  • Salvia hians

    (Himalayan Sage or Kashmir Sage) The word "hians" in Salvia hians means "gaping" and refers to the hanging lip of this sage's flowers, which are a dusky violet and bloom from late spring through early fall.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia miltiorrhiza

    (Red Sage, Chinese Sage, Dan-shen)  The bright red, finger-like roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza have a long history in traditional Chinese  herbal  medicine.  We offer this important plant on a limited basis.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia nipponica var. Formosana

    (Formosan Woodland Sage or Tai wan qin zhu cao) A native of Taiwan, this Salvia nipponica grows well in hot, humid climates as well as milder locales.
    $12.50
     

  • Salvia nubicola

    (Himalayan Cloud Sage) Nepal's Muktinath Valley -- a sacred site for Hindus and Buddhists -- is the place to go to see this majestically tall shade perennial in the wild. It grows at altitudes up to 14,000 feet and often emerges while the ground is still snowy.
    $9.50
     

  • Salvia nubicola 'CC7500'

    (Giant Himalayan Cloud Sage) Thank you, Chris Chadwell, for collecting seed for this plant at high elevations in Nepal last fall.  We find this wild variety to be larger and more robust than the domestic strain, with deeper floral color and higher flower count.  We are very excited to be able to offer this exceptional variety.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum

    (Dan-shen Gansu) Growing into a large basal rosette of leaves measuring up to 3 feet across, Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum is known for its handsome foliage.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia sp. from Szechuan

    (Bicolor Szechuan Sage) Cold hardy Chinese Salvias are a large and confusing group when it comes to scientific nomenclature. Identification for naming is expensive and difficult. That is why one of our most popular varieties doesn't have a scientific name!
    $12.50
     

  • Salvia sp. from Yunnan

    (Mystery Yunnan Sage) Sometimes we come across a beauty that has no name. This lovely species from China's Yunnan province is an excellent example. Aside from lacking scientific and common names, it arrived here as an imported seed with little information about how the plant was discovered.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia trijuga

    (san ye shu wei cao) So what do all those Pinyin words mean in this sage’s common name? We’ll give you an answer to the best of our ability in a minute. Meanwhile, we need to note that this medicinal Asian sage has handsome foliage and deep violet flowers.
    $12.50
     

  • Salvia yunnanensis

    (Yunnan Sage or yun nan shu wei cao) Yunnan Sage's tall spikes of violet-to-purple flowers bloom from summer into fall. Native to Southwestern China's provinces of Yunnan, Guizhou and Sichuan, it grows on shady, grassy hillsides and along forest margins at elevations up to 9,500 feet.
    $13.50
     



Inventory Levels to Increase

We're currently growing more of all these favorites and will have plenty available for ordering as the season progresses. Need to plant in April or May? We'll be ready for you.


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Reviews


Wow! What a HUGE, healthy plant you sent!!!! I am so impressed with the packing and the plants that I've ordered. I'm looking forward to watching this already large plant grow to maturity! You guys are the BEST!!!!
Ms. Regina Spotti
Apr 22, 2015