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Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix


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Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix

Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix


Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information

Description

(Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix) What's burgundy, pink, purple and filled with tough winter survivors for USDA Zone 5? The FBTS Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix. It lets you zen out, because its filled with Salvia and Agastache plants that require little worry or water to look beautiful.

This combo of perennial Southwestern Anise Hyssop and Autumn Sages tolerates cold, heat and drought. By purchasing them as a group, you receive a per-plant discount.

Our Curbside Zen Zone contains:

• 3 Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop ( Agastache cana 'Sinning') developed by Colorado Plant Select

• 3 Cold Hardy Pink Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii 'Cold Hardy Pink') and

• 3 Ultra Violet Hybrid Sage (Salvia lycioides x greggii 'Ultra Violet') developed by Lauren Springer Ogden.

Springer Ogden, the author of numerous garden books, coined the term hell strip. It refers to sorry excuses for landscaping, such as dry, weedy patches of grass between sidewalk and roadway. Hell strips are parts of the landscape that often are difficult to reach with a garden hose.

We've adopted the phrase for combos featuring some of our prettiest yet toughest waterwise plants for dry, full-sun conditions. All FBTS hell strip gardens contain plants averaging 30 inches tall or less in order to meet municipal rules about good sightlines to the street.

Our Curbside Zen Mix covers an area roughly 4 feet wide by 8 feet long. It leaves sufficient space between plants for healthy aeration when fully grown and allows the addition of equally drought-resistant succulents, such as sedums, and other low-growing, low-water plants.

Honeybees and hummingbirds will work this garden's long blooming flowers for rich nectar and pollen. Human admirers likely will also buzz by.

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name  
Curbside Zen Zone Hell Strip Mix
USDA Zones  
5 - 9
Exposure  
Full sun
Soil type  
Any well drained
Water needs  
Average
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
Regular Price: 
94.50
Discounted Package Price: 
88.00




This collection includes the following plants

Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant

Growing Habit

5 - 9
5 - 9




Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Agastache cana 'Sinning'

    (Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop) An abundance of lavender-rose flowers mark Agastache cana 'Sinning' as being unique from the typical purple-flowered plants of its species. Colorado plantsman Duane Sinning discovered this lovely hybrid.

    Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop was developed by Plant Select, a nonprofit organization affiliated with Colorado State University. Plant Select promotes production of and education about xeriscapic, drought-resistant plants.

    Agastache is Greek for "many flower spikes." Cana describes the plant's gray foliage, which has a pleasant anise or licorice-like fragrance. Common names for this species include Mosquito Plant, Texas Hummingbird Mint and Double Bubble Mint.

    The trademarked name refers to the Sonoran Desert and the lovely sunset purples at end of day in the plant's native American Southwest. Aside from resisting drought, Sonoran Sunset® tolerates heat and cold. Put all these characteristics together and you have an intoxicating species that excels in semi-arid climates.

    Sonoran Sunset is a full sun plant that is easy to grow but requires excellent drainage. Get its conditions right and you will be rewarded with the happy buzz of butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    Don't expect deer to bother this mint family (Lamiaceae) plant. Similar to Salvias and other minty relatives, Agastaches contain chemicals that don't appeal to hooved wildlife.

    Photo courtesy of Plant Select®.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Agastache x 'Kudos Coral'

    (Kudos Coral Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of deep coral flowers are accented by mid-green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Coral is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    Agastaches are ideal companion plants for Salvias and beneficial choices for attracting butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Similar to so many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae) -- such as sages -- they thrive in low-fertility soils, but need excellent drainage.

    Kudos Coral is a fragrant, long-blooming Agastache developed by Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries.


    Most Agastaches are native to the Southwest and Northern Mexico. These are the most heat- and drought-tolerant members of the genus. In contrast, some species -- such as the Asian Agastache rugosa -- can handle more moisture and colder winters. This one does well in USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 5.

    By crossing Southwestern species with varieties of Agastache rugosa, you gain the best of both types as in the Kudos Series. Kudos Agastaches are more compact, floriferous, long flowering and weather-resistant than most Agastaches. Their non-browning calyces create long-lasting color that endures even when blossoms are gone.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Agastache x 'Kudos Mandarin'

    (Kudos Mandarin Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of creamy orange flowers are accented by deep green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Mandarin is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    Agastaches are ideal companion plants for Salvias and beneficial choices for attracting butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Similar to so many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae) -- such as sages -- they thrive in low-fertility soils, but need excellent drainage.

    Kudos Mandarin is a fragrant, long-blooming Agastache developed by Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries.

    Most Agastaches are native to the Southwest and Northern Mexico. These are the most heat- and drought-tolerant members of the genus. In contrast, some species -- such as the Asian Agastache rugosa -- can handle more moisture and colder winters.

    By crossing Southwestern species with varieties of Agastache rugosa, you gain the best of both types as in the Kudos Series. This one grows well in USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 5. Kudos Agastaches are more tidy and upright, floriferous, long flowering and weather-resistant than most Agastaches. Their non-browning calyces create long-lasting color that endures even when blossoms are gone.

    10.50
  • Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'

    (Kudos Yellow Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Flowers by the Sea is one of the first nurseries nationwide to grow Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'. This is one of the best deep yellow Agastaches we've found, due to its large, dense flower spikes and bushy, upright form.

    Kudos Yellow Hybrid Anise Hyssop is long blooming. It has lance-shaped, mid-green leaves and green calyxes that don't turn brown when the flowers die. As its common name implies, this sage has a licorice-like fragrance.

    Most Agastaches are Southwestern and Mexican types known for resisting heat and drought. Cross these species with the Asian Agastache rugosa -- as Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries has done in its Kudos series -- and you get vigorous, cold tolerant varieties that can handle more moisture. This one also has good resistance to downy mildew.

    Kudos Yellow is made for full sun. Similar to so many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae) -- such as sages -- it thrives in low-fertility soils, but needs excellent drainage. It is an ideal companion plant for sages and a beneficial choice for attracting butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Deer just walk on by.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia greggii 'Burgundy Seduction'

    (Burgundy Seduction Autumn Sage) A deeply saturated burgundy, the flowers of this Autumn Sage clone are large and profuse. They seem to bloom nonstop and glow in contrast to their dark calyxes. Plus, this Southwestern plant grows rapidly.

    This is a hybrid of the standby 'Raspberry Delight'. We love the hybrid's depth of color. It's an excellent choice to contrast with lighter colored, drought-resistant Autumn or Mountain Sages in shrubby borders, background plantings and patio containers. We highly recommend it as our best upright purple-tone Salvia greggii.

    Burgundy Seduction blooms from spring into fall and attracts butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Deer resist its charms.
    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia greggii 'Cold Hardy Pink'

    (Cold Hardy Pink Autumn Sage) Medium creamy-hot pink flowers and contrasting, red bracts make this Autumn Sage stand out. This drought tolerant Autumn Sage from Northern Texas is also compact, rugged, heat tolerant and capable of handling Zone 5 chill. Yes - Zone 5!

    In short, being pink doesn't mean you aren't tough. This is a plant you can expect to survive rough weather. It is one of the most cold tolerant Autum Sage varieties we know of.

    The first person to bring Autumn Sage to the notice of the horticultural world was Josiah Gregg, after whom the species is named. A pioneer and plant explorer, Gregg discovered the species in Northern Mexico in the mid 19th century.
    10.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Furman's Red'

    (Furman's Red Autumn Sage) Selected by noted Texas plantsman W.A. Furman in the 1970s, this hardy Texas native is beautiful and tough withstanding heat, drought and freezing winters. Its flowers, which bloom spring through fall, are a rich, saturated red bordering on magenta.

    Averaging growth up to 3 feet tall, but never wider than 2 feet, it adds zing to borders in spaces between lower growing plants such as Salvia x jamensis. It harmonizes well with pastel types of S. x jamensis.

    Heat tolerant and drought resistant, Furman's Red is a good background planting or tall groundcover in a dry garden. It readily attracts honeybees and butterflies, but not deer. This is one of the best choices for extreme conditions, seeming to thrive on hot, dry days and cold nights. Plant it in full sun or partial shade in any well-drained soil.

    10.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Navajo Purple'

    (Navajo Autumn Sage) Even a hint of blue is unusual among Autumn Sage flowers. Salvia greggii 'Navajo Purple' is a rarity due to its magenta-purple blossoms, which hint at natural hybridization including a mystery parent in the blue range, such as Salvia lycioides.

    Sages in the Salvia greggii group are native to the American Southwest and Mexico. They hybridize naturally with other Southwestern species, which explains the purples in their group.

    You can expect heat, cold and drought tolerance from Navajo Autumn Sage, as well as fragrant foliage. Visits from honeybees and hummingbirds are also characteristic. But similar to so many mint family (Lamiaceae) members, Autumn Sages contain chemicals that aren't tasty to deer.

    Western pioneer and plant explorer Josiah Gregg introduced Autumn Sage to horticulture in 1846. He collected it in the Southwest while working as a scout and Spanish interpreter for the U.S. Army during the Mexican-American War.

    Although first cultivated in 1885 and a long-time staple in Texas gardens, Salvia greggii didn't show up in plant nurseries until about 100 years later. Now Autumn Sage and its hybrids are among the most popular types of Salvia for home gardens.

    10.50
    New!
  • Salvia lycioides x greggii 'San Isidro'

    (Saint Isidro's Sage) This hardy, lavender-blue-flowered Salvia comes from Southern Texas and has the same breeding as the famous Ultra Violet Autumn Sage. Although it needs warmer winter temperatures and has smaller foliage, it also does well in stressful conditions, including drought.

    Saint Isidro's Sage is a dwarf plant with tall flower spikes. This hybrid of Autumn Sage Salvia greggii and Canyon Sage (Salvia lycioides) will keep your garden buzzing with honeybees, hummingbirds and butterflies from spring until frost. Similar to many sages, it is deer resistant.

    This is a fine perennial border, groundcover, dry garden or container plant. Just give it full sun, good air circulation and well-drained soil.

    10.50
  • Salvia lycioides x greggii 'Ultra Violet'

    (Ultra Violet Hybrid Sage) Hardy is a word bandied about by gardeners and nurserymen. Its use is often exaggerated. But this fine hybrid deserves to be called "the hardiest Autumn Sage." It's Zone-5 hardy, drought resistant and has lovely, soft purple flowers. Ultra Violet is a winner.

    Scott and Lauren Springer Ogden, landscape designers and writers, in 2002 discovered Ultra Violet -- an unexpected dwarf hybrid -- in their high plains garden in Fort Collins, Colorado. Salvia greggii are renowned for accidentally hybridizing.

    Ultra Violet is one of the best Salvias for tough conditions, such as the hot, dry summers and freezing winters of the American West's high-altitude, semi-arid lands.  In fact, it is one of the few Salvia greggii that thrive in these conditions.

    Blooming from spring into fall, Ultra Violet will keep your garden buzzing with honeybees, hummingbirds and butterflies until frost. This deer-resistant sage makes a fine perennial border, groundcover, dry garden or container plant. Just give it full sun, good air circulation and well-drained soil.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

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Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens

Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: May 30, 2015 08:59 AM
Synopsis: On a hot day, when struggling to break up compacted, weedy soil along a curb or another hellishly difficult strip of land, you may feel like you are descending into a horticultural inferno with a garden fork. But take heart and drink lots of ice water, because the results of your work may prove divine in a year or two. Some gardeners call these drought-resistant projects “hell strip” gardens, a name coined by garden writer and designer Lauren Springer Ogden. Flowers by the Sea offers ideas for four different hell strips based on USDA Plant Hardiness Zones.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.