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Everything Else

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Everything Else

There are always odds and ends in any home, life or business. So this list offers some miscellaneous plants we grow and love that don't fit into the other menu categories in our catalog. Visit here to find a little of this and a bit of that. All are excellent and fun to grow. Come on in and rummage around!

Seaside Plants
Seaside Plants
56 products

Best of Class
Best of Class
104 products

Salvia Companions
Salvia Companions
64 products

Cloud Forest Plants
Cloud Forest Plants
67 products

Medicinal Herbs
Medicinal Herbs
39 products

Cool Growing Orchids
Cool Growing Orchids
6 products 5 categories

Blue Tag Xeric Plants
Blue Tag Xeric Plants
81 products

Plants


  • Agastache cana 'Sinning'

    (Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop) An abundance of lavender-rose flowers mark Agastache cana 'Sinning' as being unique from the typical purple-flowered plants of its species. Colorado plantsman Duane Sinning discovered this lovely hybrid.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Ava'

    (Ava Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Raspberry calyxes support Ava's rosy-pink flowers, which whorl on tall spikes similar to many Salvias. When the blossoms are spent, the calyxes remain colorful. This long-blooming hummingbird magnet is tolerant of cold, heat and drought.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Coral'

    (Kudos Coral Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of deep coral flowers are accented by mid-green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Coral is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Mandarin'

    (Kudos Mandarin Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of creamy orange flowers are accented by deep green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Mandarin is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'

    (Kudos Yellow Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Flowers by the Sea is one of the first nurseries nationwide to grow Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'. This is one of the best deep yellow Agastaches we've found, due to its large, dense flower spikes and bushy, upright form.

    10.50
     


  • Arisaema ciliatum

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) Although significantly shorter than Arisaema consanguineum, this woodland species also has radial leaves like the spokes in an umbrella. We offer you well-established clumps that will reward you by blooming the first year you plant them.

    17.00
     


    New!
  • Arisaema consanguineum 'Poseidon'

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) As its name implies, Poseidon is a tall, commanding Arisaema. We offer you a well-established clump that will reward you by blooming the first year that you plant it.

    17.00
     


  • Arisaema consanguineum 'Siren's Song'

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) Siren's Song is tall, but a bit shorter than the Poseidon cultivar of this woodland species. Its blue-green, radial leaves, are wide and wavy. They spread out like spokes at the top of the plant's stalk and have wide silver stripes down the center of each blade.

    Please note:  The flower of this variety is identical to the Poseidon clone.  The difference is the prominent silver varigation on the top surface of the leaf.

    17.00
     


  • Arisaema fargesii

    (Farges's Cobra Lily) Arisaema fargessii lends a fairytale look to a damp woodland garden. Its large white and dark purple striped bract -- called a spathe -- curves over the plant's infloresence, a finger-like structure called a spadix.

    15.00
     


  • Asclepias cancellata

    (Wild Cotton) From the winter rainfall area of southern Africa, this shrubby and unusual Milkweed is especially common in the Western Cape region.  An especially tough plant, we have noted that the Monarch larvae that migrate through our area seem to prefer this over all other species.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias curassavica 'Orange Form'

    (Orange Bloodflower) Vivid orange and gold clusters of tiny, star-shaped flowers contrast handsomely with the dark green, lance-shaped leaves of Orange Bloodflower. Other common names include Tropical Milkweed and Mexican Butterfly Weed.

    9.50
     


  • Asclepias curassavica 'Silky Gold'

    (Golden Bloodflower) Easy to cultivate, whether as an annual or tender perennial, Golden Bloodflower is a South American native that Monarchs and other butterflies love. Unlike Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), this species doesn't have a taproot. This means that it is easier to control the plant's spread.

    9.50
     


  • Asclepias eriocarpa

    (Indian Milkweed) It's the hairy, minty green foliage of Asclepias eriocarpa -- not its star-like, pink and cream flowers filled with nectar -- that is most valuable to Monarch butterflies.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'

    (Swamp Milkweed) The light green of this Milkweed's slender, lance-shaped leaves compliment its rose-pink umbels of tiny, star-shaped flowers that smell like vanilla. As its common name implies, this plant is a great solution for saturated soils, such as in rain gardens and the edge of ponds. Yet it can get by on average watering based on local conditions.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias physocarpa

    (Swan Plant) Elegant white flowers with purple inner markings change into lime green-to-gold balloon-shaped seedpods in this South African milkweed that Monarch butterflies love. The seedpods are 2 to 2 1/2 inches in diameter.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias speciosa

    (Showy Milkweed) Milkweeds (Asclepias spp. ) are must-have, nectar-rich plants in the butterfly garden. They're the only genus on which the endangered Monarch butterfly lays eggs. It is urgent that we offer this pretty, fragrant wildflower.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias tuberosa

    (Butterfly Weed) Butterfly Weed produces flat-topped umbels of tiny, star-shaped flowers atop narrow, lance-shaped leaves. Bright orange and nectar-rich, they bloom from summer into fall.

    10.50
     


  • Centaurea gymnocarpa

    (Velvet Centaurea) Lacy, velvety foliage gives this tough shrub its common name. The globular, thistle-like flowers are lavender to fuchsia pink and contrast elegantly with the silvery green of the leaves.

    10.50
     


  • Centradenia floribunda

    (Spanish Shawl) This is one of these plants that stops most people in their tracks. The deep purple/pink, standout flowers are show stoppers in and of themselves - but the furry leaves, which start green and mature to a bronze red are unique and unforgettable.

    10.50
     


  • Cestrum 'Orange Peel'

    (Orange Peel Jessamine) Mainly fragrant at night, the orange and yellow flowers of Cestrum 'Orange Peel' are the result of a cross between Night-Blooming Cestrum (C. nocturnum) and Day-Blooming Cestrum (C. diurnum).

    10.50
     


  • Deppea splendens

    (Chiapas Golden Fuchsia) Cool, moist and partially shady -- those are the conditions that this tall, rare shrub loves. Once native to the mountain cloud forests of Mexico's southernmost state, Chiapas, Golden Fuchsia in 1986 became extinct in the wild and now is primarily grown by botanical gardens.

    15.00
     


  • Dicliptera suberecta

    (Uruguayan Firecracker Plant) Mint-green foliage felted with a covering of fine hairs provides a cooling backdrop to the hot orange tubular flowers of this long-blooming member of the acanthus family (Acanthaceae).

    9.00
     


  • Echeandia texensis

    (Texas Craglily) Echeandia texensis shines in many ways. First, the delicate looking yet tough flowers are a rich shade of gold. Other stellar traits include its ability to tolerate clay soils, heat, a moderate amount of winter cold and drought.

    10.50
     


  • Leonotis leonurus

    (Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) "Leon" is Greek for "lion," whereas "otis" translates as "ear." The appellation "leonurus" equals "lion colored." Actually, we think the tawny orange blossoms of this mint family (Lamiaceae) species look more like a lion's mane.

    10.50
     


  • Leonotis menthifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) Mint Lion's Ear is a drought-tolerant perennial in areas with mild climates and works well as an annual in regions with cold winter temperatures. It is a fine Salvia companion, particularly as a middle-of-border planting that looks magnificent when massed.

    10.50
     


    Special Order Plant
    Special Order Plant   This plant is available by Special Order. Click for more information.
  • Leonotis nepetifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Klipp Dagga) Here's another plant for Dr. Seuss gardens. Mint Lion's Ear produces intermittent, shaggy whorls of fuzzy, rosy orange tubular flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love. The blossoms burst from prickly, round clusters on stems as tall and slender as auto antennas.

    10.50
     


  • Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer'

    (Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia) Slender, hot pink trumpet blossoms of Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia dangle from red flower spikes. They hang over variegated foliage that looks like someone sprayed it with lime, forest green and cream accents.

    10.50
     


  • Seemannia sylvatica 'Bolivian Sunset'

    (Bolivian Sunset Hardy Gloxinia) These flowers have a glow that lights up a shady spot. Furry and rich in color - and two inches long - they are numerous to the point of almost hiding the attractive dark green leaves during their peak. This spectacular Gesneriad comes form high elevations in the Bolivian Andes, and is Zone 8 hardy with proper mulching.

    10.50
     


  • Tillandsia usneoides

    Tillandsia usneoides is more commonly known as Spanish Moss. In the deep South, it grows in streamers from trees, most commonly Live Oaks and Bald Cypress in shaded, high humidity environs. It is a true epiphyte, a plant that lives upon other plants; from Greek "epi"=upon "phyte"=plant.

    8.50
     


  • Tweedia caerulea

    (Blue Milkweed) It's not unusual to see the sky-blue, star-shaped flowers of Tweedia caerulea tucked into bridal bouquets. Yet they are members of the humble milkweed family Asclepiadaceae.

    10.50
     




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Reviews


Plant is doing well but not yet the showy plant described. Providing great late summer color and survived a week of 100+ temps without any attention.
Ms. linda allen
Sep 7, 2017