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Everything Salvias Blog

Everything Salvias Blog

We began publishing our Everything Salvias blog in 2010 for your enjoyment and to help you "get it right" when growing sages that are often unavailable at local garden centers.

It seems like there is an endless bounty of stories to be told. But that's to be expected when covering a genus containing an estimated 900 species -- the largest group within the mint family (Lamiaceae). In addition to Salvias, we write about other species that are either mint family members or low-water companions for our many drought-tolerant Salvias. We welcome comments as well as suggestions for future blog posts.

To access articles rapidly based on your interests, please click on the categories below, which include do-it-yourself videos (Views from the Garden). If you subscribe to our RSS feed by clicking on the small orange button feed buttonĀ  , you'll receive announcements when new blog articles appear. But please note: This is a dangerous place for a sage lover.

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Everything Salvias Blog Entries


September in the Salvia Garden

September in the Salvia Garden


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Aug 29, 2017 02:01 PM
Synopsis:

Depending on where you live, September may be a time to keep busy planting perennial Salvias or to hunker-down and plan garden recovery following storm damage. Each month, FBTS publishes a list of tips suggesting ways to maintain and beautify your Salvia garden. New plantings and transplanting of sages in autumn works well; dividing or pruning them doesn't.

Ask Mr. Sage: How to Select Plants for Garden Triumph

Ask Mr. Sage: How to Select Plants for Garden Triumph


Category: Ask Mr. Sage
Posted: Aug 19, 2017 04:03 PM
Synopsis: Planning for Salvia garden success requires following the rule of selecting the right plant for the right place. Desert sages aren't appropriate for the damp Southeast. Moisture-loving ones aren't right for desert climates where they need lots of watering to survive. Flowers by the Sea Farm and Online Nursery offers tips for selecting plants based on local climate. Ask Mr. Sage is a regular feature of the FBTS Everything Salvias Blog.
Add Pale Dreamy Sages to Your List of Moon Garden Plants

Add Pale Dreamy Sages to Your List of Moon Garden Plants


Category: Cultivating Color
Posted: Aug 4, 2017 06:15 PM
Synopsis: Moon gardens contain plants with pale flowers -- especially whites -- and silvery or variegated foliage that shine in moonlight. Some gardeners plant them to glow from afar when peering into the dark through a window. Others design these gardens for nighttime rambles. A number of white-flowered sages would be excellent additions to the dreamy design of a moon garden.
August in the Salvia Garden

August in the Salvia Garden


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Jul 29, 2017 04:47 PM
Synopsis:

August is a time when many sages grow rapidly and feed a frenzy of pollinators in need of rich nectar and pollen. It's hot, so you have to be careful not to let plants or yourself wilt.

Here are some tips for tasks from watering to planning when tending your garden this month.

July in the Salvia Garden

July in the Salvia Garden


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Jun 25, 2017 10:35 AM
Synopsis:

July is a time of lush plant growth and pollinator activity in Salvia gardens. Aside from weeding and taking breaks to watch bees, hummingbirds and other small wildlife, there are many tasks to attend to in the sage garden during July. Flowers by the Sea Farm and Online Nursery offers a list of midsummer tasks to keep your garden buzzing and blooming.

We've Made Shipping Changes to Simplify Your Life & Ours

We've Made Shipping Changes to Simplify Your Life & Ours


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: May 13, 2017 04:27 PM
Synopsis: To improve our ordering process, Flowers by the Sea Online Nursery no longer accepts split orders. Dividing an order for delivery on more than one date created confusion and errors.
Ask Mr. Sage: How Should I Prune my Salvias?

Ask Mr. Sage: How Should I Prune my Salvias?


Category: Ask Mr. Sage
Posted: Apr 10, 2017 06:46 PM
Synopsis: Flowers by the Sea Online Nursery specializes in Salvias and often receives questions about how to prune them. Although getting good at pruning takes practice, Salvias rebound quickly if you make mistakes. A key to successful pruning is understanding the varying needs of four main categories of sages. Ask Mr. Sage is a regular feature of the FBTS Everything Salvias Blog.
Ask Mr. Sage: Do You Offer Free Shipping?

Ask Mr. Sage: Do You Offer Free Shipping?


Category: Ask Mr. Sage
Posted: Mar 4, 2017 10:09 AM
Synopsis: Like free lunches, free shipping is a myth. Flowers by the Sea doesn't offer free shipping, because it would require increasing plant prices to cover the cost of shipping. Read more to learn how FBTS sets fair shipping prices. Ask Mr. Sage is a regular feature of the Everything Salvias Blog and is based on calls and notes from customers.
Bedding Plant Royalty: Splendid Salvia Splendens

Bedding Plant Royalty: Splendid Salvia Splendens


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Feb 27, 2017 09:07 AM
Synopsis: If the world were to coronate a Salvia as its favorite annual, there's little doubt that a deep red variety of Scarlet Sage (Salvia splendens) would bear the sceptre. It's a long blooming, global favorite sometimes called Bedding Sage or Red Sage. When it was first introduced to horticulture in 1822, it was known as Lee's Scarlet Sage. Flowers by the Sea Online Nursery explains the growth habits and history of Scarlet Sage and suggests numerous favorite cultivars to add grandeur to your garden.
Sacred Sage: Salvia coccinea -- An American Subtropical Treasure

Sacred Sage: Salvia coccinea -- An American Subtropical Treasure


Category: Sacred Sages
Posted: Feb 27, 2017 08:53 AM
Synopsis: Although it probably originated somewhere in Mexico, Tropical Sage (Salvia coccinea) existed in the American Southeast prior to European exploration of the New World, so it is considered an American native. It's also native to Central and South America and has naturalized in parts of Europe and Africa. Medical researchers think its phytochemicals may fight illnesses caused by inflammation and oxidative stress from free radicals.