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Everything Salvias Blog

Everything Salvias Blog

We began publishing our Everything Salvias blog in 2010 for your enjoyment and to help you "get it right" when growing sages that are often unavailable at local garden centers.

It seems like there is an endless bounty of stories to be told. But that's to be expected when covering a genus containing an estimated 900 species -- the largest group within the mint family (Lamiaceae). In addition to Salvias, we write about other species that are either mint family members or low-water companions for our many drought-tolerant Salvias. We welcome comments as well as suggestions for future blog posts.

To access articles rapidly based on your interests, please click on the categories below, which include do-it-yourself videos (Views from the Garden). If you subscribe to our RSS feed by clicking on the small orange button feed button  , you'll receive announcements when new blog articles appear. But please note: This is a dangerous place for a sage lover.

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Everything Salvias Blog Entries


Salvias Down South: Tough Texans that Look Hot

Salvias Down South: Tough Texans that Look Hot


Category: Salvias Down South
Posted: Feb 4, 2016 06:13 PM
Synopsis: A little bit of a hot color warms the garden landscape; a lot sizzles. Salvias that are red, orange, salmon and intensely pink make eyes snap to attention when grown en masse or as highlights complementing cool-colored perennials. Texas is home to a number of tough, drought-resistant species that can make a garden look hot. In this article, Flowers by the Sea focuses on nine to light up southern landscapes.
Quick Digs: Inventorying Salvias and Tools for Spring Gardening

Quick Digs: Inventorying Salvias and Tools for Spring Gardening


Category: Quick Digs
Posted: Jan 30, 2016 05:48 PM
Synopsis: This is the first article in our new Quick Digs series about preparing for spring in Salvia gardens. As spring approaches and daylight grows longer, first steps for preparing Salvia gardening include recording sages already planted before planning new purchases, repotting cuttings and seedlings, inventorying garden tools and turning the compost heap. When the first new growth arrives, you'll be prepared to remove weeds before they choke sages and other perennials that are re-emerging.
Sacred Sage: Menorah-Shaped Salvia hierosolymitana Bridges Cultures

Sacred Sage: Menorah-Shaped Salvia hierosolymitana Bridges Cultures


Category: Sacred Sages
Posted: Dec 18, 2015 09:57 AM
Synopsis: Heading into the season of long, dark nights and candlelit holiday dinners, it is pleasant to think of the candelabra-shaped Jerusalem Sage (Salvia hierosolymitana) lit up with raspberry and pale pink flowers in spring. It's structure was likely an inspiration during Biblical times for design of the Jewish menorah. Jerusalem Sage grows well in moderate climates and has tasty leaves used in cooking. Historically and in culinary use, it bridges the Arab and Israeli cultures.
Salvias Down South 15 Sages to Pink Up Landscapes

Salvias Down South 15 Sages to Pink Up Landscapes


Category: Salvias Down South
Posted: Dec 14, 2015 11:36 AM
Synopsis: Winter is a good time for warm thoughts about rosy colors pinking up the landscape. Not only is pink pleasant, but it is soothing. As psychologists discovered in the late 20th century, it's also the color of calm. Researchers have identified at least one shade of pink -- a vivid color now known as drunk tank pink -- as lessening aggressive moods of people who are incarcerated. Pink is also a color used in serenity gardens. Flowers by the Sea details 15 pink sages here, some of which bloom in winter.
New at FBTS: Take a Peek at 'Quick Look'

New at FBTS: Take a Peek at 'Quick Look'


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: Dec 7, 2015 04:11 PM
Synopsis: Quick Look is a new shortcut on the Flowers by the Sea Online Nursery homepage that takes you quickly to galleries of Salvia groups in our online catalog. FBTS wants to make your shopping and gardening life easier.
Quick Digs: Overwintering Salvias in Containers Outdoors

Quick Digs: Overwintering Salvias in Containers Outdoors


Category: Quick Digs
Posted: Dec 3, 2015 01:39 PM
Synopsis: In chilly climates, such as USDA Cold Hardiness Zones with winter temperatures lower than those of Zone 8, it is difficult for potted plants to survive outdoors when the mercury dips. Soil in containers freezes harder and thaws more rapidly than the ground. So plants in containers are subjected to bigger changes in conditions on a winter patio or entryway. This is the third article in our current Quick Digs series on preparation for winter in the Salvia garden. This article discusses bottom-line rules for improving chances of survival when overwintering sages in containers and suggests a variety of ideas for overwintering outdoors.
Salvia Small Talk: Winter Watering

Salvia Small Talk: Winter Watering


Category: Salvia Small Talk
Posted: Nov 23, 2015 11:11 AM
Synopsis: Giving perennials, bushes and trees one or two heavy waterings during winter, on warmer days, prevents root damage
Photographer Bud Hensley Attracts Hummingbirds Galore

Photographer Bud Hensley Attracts Hummingbirds Galore


Category: Portraits in Gardening
Posted: Nov 19, 2015 04:27 PM
Synopsis: If you plant plenty of hummingbird favorites, including Salvias, great photo opportunities will come. That's the advice of Ohioan Bud Hensley for nature shutterbugs.
Drought Praise: Around the World with Sunny Groundcovers

Drought Praise: Around the World with Sunny Groundcovers


Category: Xeric Choices
Posted: Sep 8, 2015 06:56 PM
Synopsis: Bring on the sun. Bring on the heat. Bring on the drought-resistant Salvia groundcovers.Flowers by the Sea offers a short list of top groundcovers from around the world for fighting drought. They come from Asia, California, Mexico and Morocco in lavender, purple and pink to do battle against the boring brown caused by water shortage. Similar to gravel, bark chip or pine needle mulch, these groundcovers discourage weeds, cool soil, conserve moisture and add color to gardens. They are living mulch.
New at FBTS: Butterflies Love Perennial Echeandia Texensis

New at FBTS: Butterflies Love Perennial Echeandia Texensis


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: Sep 7, 2015 08:55 AM
Synopsis: It isn't surprising that the golden flowers of the drought-resistant, perennial Texas Craglily (Echeandia texensis) are tops for attracting butterflies. The plant was first discovered on Green Island in Laguna Madre, which is at the southernmost tip of Texas. The area is part of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, which is home to 300 butterfly species. Texas Craglily is an adaptable plant that grows well both in dry and somewhat damp conditions and from California to the Southeast. But it is a rare species that may be threatened by land development and the U.S./Mexico border fence.

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Reviews


I bought this plant from another Nursery. We moved it to the front bed last year after finding out that it sends flower spikes out by the heat (not the sun). it blooms well with our intense heat & sun here in Texas & the Hummingbirds just love thi...
Bonnie Bell
Feb 5, 2016