Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter


  • Details

  • Cultural Icons

  • Compatible Plants

  • Customer Reviews

  • Attracting Hummingbirds

  • Attracting Butterflies

  • Deer Tips

Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter

Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter


Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information

Description

(Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter) Cundinamarca Sage (Salvia gachantivana ), Cedar Sage (S. roemeriana ) and Ember's Wish Sage (S. x 'Ember's Wish') form a hot cha cha combination of red and orange in this specially priced planter kit.

Container gardening is ideal for balconies, decks, patios, entryways, and small yards. We make the project easier by offering kits that combine plants with similar needs and coordinate harmonious colors and shapes. Each planter collection has a dramatic focus (thriller) and a lovely complement (filler), which may also be combined with a gracefully spreading and trailing species (spiller), such as the Cedar Sage in this combo.

Here's more information about FBTS Container Kits.

Container Kit Details
Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter
Feature Attribute
Pot Size Large
Exposure Sun
Duration Annual
Zone USDA Zone 9-11
Thriller Salvia gachantivana
Spiller Salvia roemeriana
Filler Salvia x 'Ember's Wish'
Hummingbirds

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name  
Gachantivana Wish Sun Planter
USDA Zones  
9 - 11
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
Regular Price: 
30.50
Discounted Package Price: 
28.00




This collection includes the following plants

Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Fragrant
Fragrant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11




Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Butterflies
Butterflies
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Salvia gachantivana

    (Cundinamarca Sage) This Colombian Salvia is difficult to obtain outside of its home country. As far as we know, Flowers by the Sea is the first nursery to offer it in the United States.

    In 1974, botanist José Luis Fernández Alonso of Spain's Royal Botanical Garden named this sage for the place near which it was found high in the Colombian Andes -- the village of Gachantiva in the province of Boyaca.

    However, one common name for this tall, water-loving sage reflects the central province of Cundinamarca, which is home to the nation's capital of Bogota and is south of Boyaca.

    Salvia gachantivana is related to S. orthostachys, but isn't as rigidly upright. It tolerates heat, blooms for a long time and features fuzzy, scarlet flowers amid heart-shaped leaves.

    Full sun and rich, well-drained soil are best for this sage. It is a fine container plant and a pretty screen that is perennial in areas with warm winters.

    Salvia gachantivana is a good addition to a wildlife garden, because hummingbirds love this long-blooming sage. Quantities are limited, but if we have run out, you can always ask us to email you when this plant is back in stock.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia roemeriana

    (Cedar Sage) Scarlet flowers abound from spring through summer on this small, mounding, woodland sage that is native to Texas, Arizona and Northern Mexico. Grow it as a small scale groundcover or mix it with other shade-loving sages in a perennial border or along a path.

    Native to Cedar, Juniper and Oak forests, this sage prefers partial shade and well-drained, acidic soil rich in organic matter. It does particularly well when mulched with the type of leaves found in its native forests. Although it likes regular watering based on local conditions, Cedar Sage does well in dry gardens.

    This is a petite plant that only spreads about 12 inches wide. Yet if you plant a number of Salvia roemeriana in the right conditions, the plants will self seed and form colonies. We have never found it to be invasive.

    9.50
  • Salvia x 'Ember's Wish'

    (Ember's Wish Sage) Bright coral-colored, tubular blossoms contrast handsomely with the deep maroon stems, rusty rose calyxes and mid-green foliage of Ember's Wish Sage.

    Plant Growers Australia (PGA) discovered and developed this naturally occurring sport of Wendy's Wish Sage (Salvia x 'Wendy's Wish'), which is an accidental hybrid from the Victoria, Australia, garden of Salvia enthusiast Wendy Smith. Similar to its parent plant, Ember's Wish is popular with hummingbirds but not deer.

    Smith found Wendy's Wish beneath S. mexicana 'Lolly'. However, its parentage is unknown. Some nearby sages it may be related to are Buchanan's Sage (S. buchananii), Scarlet Sage (S. splendens), Chiapas Sage (Salvia chiapensis) and Purple Majesty Sage (S. guaranitica 'Purple Majesty').

    PGA decided that, as with Wendy's Wish, licensing of Ember's Wish would require that a portion of each sale benefit Australia's Make-a-Wish Foundation. A third member of the Wish Collection, Love and Wishes Sage, also aids the foundation in fulfilling the requests of Australia's seriously ill children.

    The parents of two teenage siblings who died from a genetic disorder, Emma and Brett Shegog, won the right to name PGA's plant. They combined their children's first names to create "Ember."

    In coastal areas with moderate temperatures, Ember's Wish grows well in full sun. However, it appreciates a bit of shade in hotter climates. Growing about waist-high, Ember's Wish is a floriferous plant that requires little to no deadheading of blossoms. Its combination of woody and soft herbaceous growth mark it as a subshrub.

    Although this long-blooming sage does well with average irrigation based on local conditions, it appreciates plentiful watering with excellent soil drainage.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

There have been no reviews


I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.

Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.