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Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix


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Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix

Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix


Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information

Description

(Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix) Q: Do popsicles melt in hell strip gardens? A: Not if they are Popsicle Kniphofia, better known as dwarf Hot Poker plants. Mix in some cool blue-flowered Yugoslavian Cut Leaf Sage (Salvia jurisicii ) and you have a Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix handling chilly winters in Zone 6.

Although it is accustomed to moderate temperatures in its South African homeland, the Kniphofia genus is adaptable to varying climates. Popsicle Series hybrids were developed in often-chilly Oregon whereas our S. jurisicii is native to high-altitude Baltic steppe lands in countries such as Bulgaria.

This combo of heat-tolerant, drought-resistant perennials requires little worry or water to remain beautiful. By purchasing the plants as a group, you receive a discount. The mix contains:

• 2 Mango Popsicle Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle')

• 2 Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Poco Orange')

• 2 Redhot Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle')

• 2 Yugoslavian Cut Leaf Sage (Salvia jurisicii)

Garden writer Lauren Springer Ogden coined the term hell strip. It refers to sorry excuses for landscaping, such as dry, weedy patches of grass between sidewalk and roadway. Hell strips are parts of the landscape that often are difficult to reach with a garden hose.

We've adopted the term for combos featuring some of our prettiest yet toughest waterwise plants for dry, full-sun conditions. All FBTS hell strip gardens contain plants about 30 inches tall or less in order to meet municipal rules about good sightlines to the street.

Our Hot-But-Cool Mix covers an area roughly 4 feet wide by 8 feet long. It leaves sufficient space between plants for healthy aeration when mature and allows the addition of equally drought-resistant succulents, such as sedums, and other low growing, low water plants.

Honeybees and hummingbirds love the long blooming flowers of this sizzling yet soothing plant collection.

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name  
Hot-But-Cool Hell Strip Mix
USDA Zones  
6 - 9
Exposure  
Full sun
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
Regular Price: 
92.00
Discounted Package Price: 
75.00




This collection includes the following plants

Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant

Growing Habit

6 - 9
6 - 9




Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. This is absolutely our favorite. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its bright, neutral color that goes with anything. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its intensel color that really stands out in a crowd. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have.

    11.50
  • Salvia brandegeei x munzii 'Pacific Blue'

    (Pacific Blue Sage) Whorls of deep lavender-blue flowers contrast brightly against the dark maroon stems of this likely hybrid of Salvia brandegeei and Salvia munzii.

    The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden discovered Pacific Blue as a surprise cross near one of its S. brandegeei, a native of Santa Rosa Island in Santa Barbara's Channel Islands as well as Baja, Mexico.

    Pacific Blue is a well-branched, vigorous shrub. It tolerates heat and handles drought due to the moisture-conserving, fuzzy white undersides of its fragrant, dark green leaves.

    Honeybees and hummingbirds love this long-blooming sage. Pacific Blue even grows in clay soil as long as there is good drainage, such as on a slope. Give it full sun and average watering based on local conditions.

    10.50
  • Salvia jurisicii

    (Yugoslavian Cut Leaf Sage) This is a rare Baltic steppe plant that grows beautifully in sunny locations with little water and excellent drainage. It is endemic to a the Orlova Brdo region of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

    Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Kosovo and Serbia border the FYRM, which adopted its lengthy name to avoid confusion with the Macedonian states of Greece.

    The fuzzy, pale blue-to-violet flowers of Yugoslavian Cut Leaf Sage hang upside down. In the right light, their fuzziness gives them a halo-like look. They are cupped by rosy green calyxes and accented by two kinds of mid-green foliage.

    The basal leaves of Salvia jurisicii are ovate and scalloped. Whorls of deeply lobed, needle-shaped leaves punctuate the flower stems, giving the plant a feathery look from a distance.

    This clump-forming, petite perennial tolerates heat, cold and drought while also discouraging hungry deer. It thrives in rock gardens as well as containers with gravelly soil.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia mellifera 'Jade Carpet'

    (Jade Carpet Black Sage) Black Sage Salvia mellifera is one of the most common and fragrant native shrubs in the California Coast Ranges and is ideal for dry gardens. At 24 inches tall by 6 feet wide, this variety is an excellent groundcover. It is slightly taller and has more grey in the leaf color than the closely related variety 'Terra Seca'.

    Admirably adaptable, Jade Carpet tolerates soils ranging from the most marginal to loamy with excellent drainage. It does well on slopes and loves full sun and heat.

    The long, elegant, grey-green leaves are attractively wrinkled and powerfully aromatic. Flower spikes covered with whorls of small white-to-lavender blossoms show off from spring into summer.

    As its common and scientific names imply, this sage is ideal for dry gardens where it provides vital food and cover for small wildlife. Black Sages are vital sources of nectar and pollen for honeybees and hummingbirds during bloom time. Later, songbirds enjoy their seeds.
    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia mellifera 'Terra Seca'

    (Dry Earth Black Sage) Black Sage Salvia mellifera is one of the most common and fragrant native shrubs in the California Coast Ranges and is ideal for dry gardens. At 12 inches tall by 5 feet wide, this variety is an excellent groundcover.

    Admirably adaptable, Terra Seca tolerates soils ranging from the most marginal to loamy with excellent drainage. It does well on slopes and loves full sun and heat.

    The long, elegant, bright green leaves are attractively wrinkled and powerfully aromatic. Flower spikes covered with whorls of small white-to-lavender blossoms show off from spring into summer.

    As its common and scientific names imply, this sage is ideal for dry gardens where it provides vital food and cover for small wildlife. Black Sages are vital sources of nectar and pollen for honeybees and hummingbirds during bloom time. Later, songbirds enjoy their seeds.

    10.50
  • Salvia pachyphylla 'Blue Flame'

    (Giant Purple Desert Sage) It’s best to plant this flamboyant native of the Southwest in spring or summer. However, once established, it tolerates winters from USDA Zones 5 to 9. Purple tubular flowers and burgundy bracts flare up its 10-inch flower spikes like flames on this softly rounded shrub.

    Fragrant, drought resistant and heat tolerant, this is a sage that isn’t particular about soils as long as they drain well. Give this shrub lots of sunshine and little water for best performance.  We have learned by experience that this species grows best where there are definite seasons, and where the winters are not particularly wet.  They thrive in Denver, and languish in Los Angeles.

    Blue Flame’s improbably lush flowers are offset by mid-green foliage. It does well in dry, gravelly gardens as a groundcover, border or pathway edging and is just right for a native garden focusing on the Southwest or a wide variety of American native species.

    Expect Blue Flame to grow up to 36 inches tall and 24 inches wide and to flower from summer to fall. Expect to fall in love with it; certainly butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds do. Luckily, deer avoid it.

    Thanks for the beautiful photo go to high-altitude plant expert Panayoti Kelaidis, senior curator and director of outreach at Denver Botanic Gardens.

    10.50
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New at FBTS: Easy-to-Grow Plant Collection

New at FBTS: Easy-to-Grow Plant Collection


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: Jun 24, 2015 01:25 PM
Synopsis: Flowers by the Sea doesn't believe in paint-by-numbers anything, but pre-packaged plant mixes save gardeners effort and money when creating garden masterpieces. At FBTS, we believe in the power of flowers to raise spirits. Although life isn't a bed of Salvias, cares fade temporarily when you step into a garden filled with color and fragrance. But it can be difficult to find time to coordinate a single flowerbed. Lots of decisions go into planning, such as selecting plants with similar cultural needs and putting together pleasing combinations. If you are a garden designer, you may especially appreciate the financial break that plant packages offer when massing vivid, vigorous arrays of color. FBTS details nine new plant collections and explores The Talking Heads' classic Nothing But Flowers along the way.
Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens

Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: May 30, 2015 08:59 AM
Synopsis: On a hot day, when struggling to break up compacted, weedy soil along a curb or another hellishly difficult strip of land, you may feel like you are descending into a horticultural inferno with a garden fork. But take heart and drink lots of ice water, because the results of your work may prove divine in a year or two. Some gardeners call these drought-resistant projects “hell strip” gardens, a name coined by garden writer and designer Lauren Springer Ogden. Flowers by the Sea offers ideas for four different hell strips based on USDA Plant Hardiness Zones.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.