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Hummingbird Plants

Hummingbird Plants

We love hummingbirds, and they love us back with lots of visits. That's because our gardens are abundant in the tubular-shaped, nectar-rich flowers of sages and companion plants. Almost any sage (Salvia spp.) will attract hummingbirds. However, this list is based on the plants that hummingbirds regularly swarm in our garden and sneak into our greenhouses to sip.

You'll find a wide range of Salvia species and varieties here, especially ones from the Western Hemisphere. Over the years, we have noticed that hummingbirds seem to prefer mint-family plants (Lamiaceae) from the West. This makes sense considering that these flying jewels aren't found in the Eastern Hemisphere; native animals prefer native flora.

Plants and pollinators in a region coevolve to meet each other's needs. For example, the tube-shaped flowers of North and Central American Lamiaceae particularly fit the beaks of hummingbirds living in those areas whereas some South American sages with longer blossoms require the longer beaks of South American hummers for pollination.

North or South, the super-rich nectar of Salvias and other mint-type plants keep tiny wings whirring. Also, insects attracted to their nectar give the birds an added dietary boost of protein.

We have discovered some happy contradictions to the Hemisphere rule. So we include some Eastern Hemisphere plants here that hummingbirds crave, especially ones from South Africa. These include Salvia companions that are also Lamiaceae. Birds in South Africa, with similarly long beaks, go crazy for the nectar in their trumpet-shaped blossoms.

In addition to basing our selections for this list on years of observation, we also listen to what you have to say. Based on customer feedback, all these plants seem to be hummingbird favorites wherever they are grown. But keep in mind that just because a sage is not listed here does not mean it won't attract and nourish hummers.

Products


  • Agastache rugosa 'Heronswood Mist'

    (Anise Hyssop) Although most varieties of Agastache (Anise Hyssop) come from the American Southwest and Northern Mexico, this is an Asian variety that is native to Korea, Japan and China. It is a magnet for butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.
    $7.00
     

  • Agastache x 'Ava'

    (Ava Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Raspberry calyxes support Ava's rosy-pink flowers, which whorl on tall spikes similar to many Salvias. When the blossoms are spent, the calyxes remain colorful. This long-blooming hummingbird magnet is tolerant of cold, heat and drought.

    $8.00
     

  • Agastache x 'Kudos Coral'

    (Kudos Coral Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of deep coral flowers are accented by mid-green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Coral is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    $8.50
     

  • Agastache x 'Kudos Gold'

    (Kudos Gold Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Compact spikes of burnished gold, tubular flowers attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds to the latest Kudos Agastache from Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries. The dense flower plumes are accented by mid-green, veined, spear-shaped leaves.

    $8.50
     

  • Agastache x 'Kudos Mandarin'

    (Kudos Mandarin Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of creamy orange flowers are accented by deep green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Mandarin is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    $8.50
     

  • Agastache x 'Summer Glow'

    (Summer Glow Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Sunny yellow flowers form a striking contrast with plum-colored, leaf-like calyxes in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Summer Glow is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.
    $8.50
     

  • Agastache x 'Violet Vision'

    (Violet Vision Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Wands of deep violet blossoms rise up from heart-shaped, mid-green leaves in this compact, upright Agastache developed by Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries. Flowers and foliage alike have a sweet honey-licorice fragrance.
    $8.50
     

  • Anisacanthus wrightii

    (Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its bright orange trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    $8.00
     

  • Anisacanthus wrightii 'Pumpkin Orange'

    (Orange Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its clear, pumpkin-orange trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    $8.50
     

  • Anisacanthus wrightii 'Select Red'

    (Red Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its bright red trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    $8.50
     

  • Cantua buxifoloa

    (Sacred flower of the Incas) Long reddish blossoms with flared, trumpet-like corollas and bright blue pollen contrast with mid-green foliage in the long-blooming, South American species Cantua buxifolia.

    $8.50
     

  • Cantua buxifoloa 'Golden Inca'

    (Golden Sacred flower of the Incas) Long, golden yellow flowers with a rosy blush to their flared, trumpet-like corollas contrast with mid-green foliage in this long-blooming variety of the South American species Cantua buxifolia.

    $8.50
     

  • Cuphea 'Minnie Mouse'

    (Minnie Mouse Ears) Floriferous and heat tolerant, Cuphea 'Minnie Mouse' is also a long-blooming addition to wildlife gardens. Similar to Salvias, Cupheas are rich sources of nectar that fuel hummingbird migration. Bees, butterflies and hoverflies are among the other pollinators that love this genus.

    $7.50
     

  • Cuphea 'Strybing Sunset'

    Floriferous and heat tolerant, Cuphea 'Strybing Sunset' is a long-blooming addition to wildlife gardens. Similar to Salvias, Cupheas are rich sources of nectar that fuel hummingbird migration. Bees, butterflies and hoverflies are among the other pollinators that love this genus.

    $8.00
     

  • Cuphea aff. aequipetala

    (Mexican Loosestrife) The tempting, purple-to-magenta flowers of Cuphea aff. aequipetala attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds as well as gardeners who love color. Abundant blossoms flare into six-petal corollas at the end of long, cylindrical flowers.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea llavea 'Elk Red'

    (Elk Red Bat Faced Cuphea) A tiny purple "snout" emerges from multiple scarlet petals at the end of this Cuphea's tubular flower, giving it a bat-like appearance. This is a Flowers by the Sea cultivar. We're proud of Elk Red's vibrant color and the way it attracts butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea micropetala

    (Candy Corn Plant) Due to their bright colors and rich nectar, Cupheas are magnets for pollinators, including butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. That's certainly true for the orange and yellow, candy-corn colored flowers of Cuphea micropetala.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea nelsonii

    (Nelson's Bat-Faced Cuphea) A tiny snout-like face emerges at the end of this Cuphea's tubular flower and beneath two red-orange petals shaped like bat ears. "Too cute!" is a typical response to these whimsical flowers that attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    $7.50
     

  • Cuphea oreophila

    (Orange Bat-Faced Cuphea) A corolla of irregularly sized petals -- two tall and four short -- give the opening of this Cuphea's bright red-orange flowers a bat-like look. Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds love the abundant, nectar-rich, cylindrical blossoms that flower nearly year round in areas with mild climates.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea schumannii

    Floriferous and heat tolerant, Cuphea schumannii is also a long-blooming addition to wildlife gardens. Similar to Salvias, Cupheas are rich sources of nectar that fuel hummingbird migration. Bees, butterflies and hoverflies are among the other pollinators that love this genus.

    $8.00
     

  • Cuphea x 'David Verity'

    (David Verity Cigar Plant) Cuphea flowers are hummingbird magnets, especially the orange-red blooms of the David Verity hybrid. The blossoms have been likened to cigars due to their tubular shape and hot coloring that ends with a slightly flared and fringed yellow opening instead of petals.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea x 'Kristen's Delight'

    (Kristen's Delightful Cigar Plant) Hummingbirds and butterflies love Cupheas. Kristen's Delightful Cigar Plant is a spectacularly colorful hybrid that is also a magnet for gardeners who love the pastels and abundance of its bicolor flowers.

    $7.00
     

  • Cuphea x purpurea

    (Bat-Faced Cuphea) A tiny snout-like face emerges at the end of this Cuphea's tubular flower and beneath two red and purple petals shaped like bat ears. "Too cute!" is a typical response to these whimsical flowers that attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    $7.00
     

  • Iochroma cyaneum 'Royal Purple'

    (Royal Purple Arbol de Brujo) Clusters of slender trumpet flowers in shades of lavender to purple hang from this large, shrubby, South American plant. Its large, velvety, silver-green leaves have smooth edges.

    $8.50
     

  • Iochroma fuchsiodes

    (Red Arbol de Brujo) From the high, moist forests of the Andes comes this elegant and dramatic plant. Glossy leaves and dark bark on this six foot plus shrub are a fine background for the ultra-numerous three inch long creamy red flowers that flare at the ends to revel the coppery-orange interiors. Blooming thorough the warm season, it is an unbelievable draw for the hummingbirds!

    $9.50
     

  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    $8.50
     

  • Kniphofia 'Orange Vanilla Popsicle'

    (Orange Vanilla Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    $10.00
     

  • Kniphofia 'Papaya Popsicle'

    (Papaya Popsicle Hot Poker) Terra Nova Nursery's Popsicle Series of dwarf Hot Poker perennials are reminiscent of the kind of frozen treats designed to look like rocket ships and fireworks. The blossoms of Papaya Popsicle are a bright orange-red and gold.

    $8.50
     

  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    $8.50
     

  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy. And redhot, by the way.

    $8.50
     

  • Leonotis leonurus

    (Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) "Leon" is Greek for "lion," whereas "otis" translates as "ear." The appellation "leonurus" equals "lion colored." Actually, we think the tawny orange blossoms of this mint family (Lamiaceae) species look more like a lion's mane.

    $7.50
     

  • Leonotis menthifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) Mint Lion's Ear is a drought-tolerant perennial in areas with mild climates and works well as an annual in regions with cold winter temperatures. It is a fine Salvia companion, particularly as a middle-of-border planting that looks magnificent when massed.

    $7.50
     

  • Leonotis nepetifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Klipp Dagga) Here's another plant for Dr. Seuss gardens. Mint Lion's Ear produces intermittent, shaggy whorls of fuzzy, rosy orange tubular flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love. The blossoms burst from prickly, round clusters on stems as tall and slender as auto antennas.

    $7.50
     

  • Lobelia 'Grape Knee-Hi'

    (Purple Cardinal Flower) Hummingbirds and butterflies enjoy the nectar of this juicy looking lobelia, which features purple flowers with white throats against mid-green foliage. It is an excellent addition to the wildlife garden.

    $8.50
     

  • Lobelia 'Monet Moment'

    (Pink Cardinal Flower) What a great perennial. Fast, easy and rewarding. The columns of bright pink flowers last longer than most Lobelia, and are fragrant as well!

    $8.50
     

  • Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia

    (Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the long, scarlet and orange trumpet blossoms of this Lobelia native to the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico.

    $8.50
     



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Reviews


the plants that came were lovely well packed great root system with crisp fres leaves and large I an waiting to see how they survive my zone 5 winter !!
Ms. Yasmeen Moody
Nov 5, 2014