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Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia


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Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia



Time to think about Fall Planting
This plant is
Ideal for Fall Planting
Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

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Description

(Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the long, scarlet and orange trumpet blossoms of this Lobelia native to the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico.

Mexican Cardinalflower is another common name for Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower. In its scientific name, the term laxiflora refers to the looseness of this long-blooming, clump-spreading plant's flower stems. Angustifolia concerns the narrowness of its shiny leaves.

The Lobelia genus is named for French botanist and herbalist Matthias de l'Obel (1538-1616) who served as physician and botanist to Britain's King James I.

Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower triples in height when in bloom. It grows well in full sun to partial shade and tolerates heat. Although it thrives with average watering based on local conditions, this beauty also tolerates drought. It is perennial in a broad range of zones and, due to rapid growth, is a good bedding plant in areas with frigid winters. Plant it in rich soil.

Details

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In stock
2 item(s) available

Common name  
Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower
USDA Zones  
7 - 10
Size (h/w/fh)  
12"/24"/36"
Exposure  
Full sun
Soil type  
Rich
Water needs  
Average
Pot size  
3 1/2" deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
10.50

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Quantity (2 available)




Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

7 - 10
7 - 10
12 inches tall
12 inches tall
24 inches wide
24 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Butterflies
Butterflies
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Agastache x 'Kudos Mandarin'

    (Kudos Mandarin Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of creamy orange flowers are accented by deep green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Mandarin is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    Agastaches are ideal companion plants for Salvias and beneficial choices for attracting butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Similar to so many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae) -- such as sages -- they thrive in low-fertility soils, but need excellent drainage.

    Kudos Mandarin is a fragrant, long-blooming Agastache developed by Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries.

    Most Agastaches are native to the Southwest and Northern Mexico. These are the most heat- and drought-tolerant members of the genus. In contrast, some species -- such as the Asian Agastache rugosa -- can handle more moisture and colder winters.

    By crossing Southwestern species with varieties of Agastache rugosa, you gain the best of both types as in the Kudos Series. This one grows well in USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 5. Kudos Agastaches are more tidy and upright, floriferous, long flowering and weather-resistant than most Agastaches. Their non-browning calyces create long-lasting color that endures even when blossoms are gone.

    10.50
  • Anisacanthus wrightii 'Pumpkin Orange'

    (Orange Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its clear, pumpkin-orange trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    Orange Texas Firecracker is a subshrub, which means that it combines soft, herbaceous perennial foliage with some woodiness. It has slender, lance-shaped, dark green leaves. Trim it back in late winter for better form and fuller spring growth.

    Although related to the Bears Breeches genus (Acanthus), Orange Texas Firecracker lacks the thorny sepals of those plants. Anisacanthus is Greek for "without thorns" and quadrifidus refers to the four petals of its flower. The phrase var. Wrightii means that this is a variation of the native Texas species named for American botanist Charles Wright (1811-1885). Beginning in 1837, Wright spent 15 years collecting extensively in Texas.

    This is a mid-height, heat-tolerant species that loves full sun. Orange Texas Firecracker resists drought, but thrives with average watering based on local conditions. For pyrotechnical color in the garden, mix it with the deep orange flowers of Texas Firecracker (Anisacanthus wrightii) and the crimson blossoms of Red Texas Firecracker ( Anisacanthus wrightii 'Select Red').

    Don't worry about deer; this plant isn't to their taste.

    10.50
  • Asclepias curassavica 'Orange Form'

    (Orange Bloodflower) Vivid orange and gold clusters of tiny, star-shaped flowers contrast handsomely with the dark green, lance-shaped leaves of Orange Bloodflower. Other common names include Tropical Milkweed and Mexican Butterfly Weed.

    The last name tells you what a magnet this is for Lepidoptera . The endangered Monarch butterfly is particularly drawn to the milkweed family ( Asclepiadaceae), which includes Orange Bloodflower.

    Monarchs lay their eggs on milkweeds, because those are the only plants their caterpillars will eat. The roughness of fuzzy milkweed foliage makes it easier for eggs and chrysalises to cling to the plants. Monarch caterpillars consume powerful chemicals in the leaves protecting them as babies and adults against predators for whom the chemicals are toxic. Perhaps it is these chemicals that make deer avoid the plant.

    This particular milkweed is native to South America and is perennial in USDA zones where winter temperatures are warmer. In zones with colder winters, it works well as a bedding plant. When grown as an annual, Orange Bloodroot can be cut back in late autumn and moved indoors to overwinter. But don't forget to reduce watering and place it in a cool, but sunny location.

    Although it is a water lover, Orange Bloodflower grows well with average watering based on local conditions. It is a good solution for sunny, damp areas of the yard.

    Unlike Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), this species doesn't have a taproot. This means that it is easier to control the plant's spread.

    In the past few years, much has been written about the problems as well as the benefits that Tropical Milkweeds present for Monarch butterflies. Butterflies adore these lush bloomers, which offer plentiful nectar and provide what is becoming scarce -- lodging for Monarch larvae.

    However, where these plants persist outdoors during winter, Monarchs may not complete their migration to Mexico. This creates a number of difficulties, including illness for the butterflies. The best way to avoid this problem in warm regions is to cut all types of Tropical Milkweed to the ground during autumn.

    Please note: this is a seed grown strain and there is some variation in flower color from plant to plant.

    9.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. This is absolutely our favorite. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Papaya Popsicle'

    (Papaya Popsicle Hot Poker) Terra Nova Nursery's Popsicle Series of dwarf Hot Poker perennials are reminiscent of the kind of frozen treats designed to look like rocket ships and fireworks. The blossoms of Papaya Popsicle are a bright orange-red and gold.

    Tidy clumps of grassy, green foliage surround Papaya Popsicle's flower spikes. It is a full-sun perennial that appreciates regular watering but is drought resistant. We grow a number of Popsicle Kniphofias and can attest to their super-long bloom time, which keeps butterflies and hummingbirds busy in our gardens.

    Aside from being wildlife friendly, this easy-to-grow Hot Poker is cold tolerant and works well in Salvia gardens due to low demand for both water and fertilizer. Sometimes Kniphofias are referred to as Torch Lilies due to their shape as well as their fiery look, which helps light up the landscape -- especially when mixed with hot-colored Salvias.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its bright, neutral color that goes with anything. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50
  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its intensel color that really stands out in a crowd. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have.

    11.50
  • Lobelia 'Monet Moment'

    (Monet Moment Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Lobelia 'Monet Moment' are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    The unusually shaped tubular flowers of Monet Moment Cardinal Flower are slit nearly to their base to form two lips. The bottom lip has three lobes; the top has two. The flower spikes are tipped with tiny, mid-green leaves and rise up vertically out of a a clumping, basal rosette of foliage.

    This rewarding American native grows quickly, is easy to cultivate and tolerates both heat and cold. Although it does fine with average watering, it loves moisture and thrives in damp spots including locations near ponds and bogs. 

    Although it enjoys full sun, Monet Moment still blooms like crazy when planted in partial shade. Try it in patio containers, borders and seasonal flowerbeds. It's especially ideal for woodland and native plant gardens.

    The genus name Lobelia honors Flemish botanist Matthias de L'Obel (1538-1616) whose work focused on medicinal plants. Historically, some Lobelias have been used to treat asthma, baldness, depression, syphilis and withdrawal from smoking. Research continues about medical use of the genus. Please remember that no herbal substance should be consumed before consulting a physician.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

    New!
  • Salvia elegans 'Golden Delicious'

    (Golden Pineapple Sage) The bright crimson flowers of this extremely fragrant, shrubby sage are attractive to both humans and pollinators. However, it is the glowing golden foliage that most distinguishes it from other varieties of its species.

    In cooler parts of its climate range, such as in Zone 9, Golden Pineapple Sage grows well in full sun. In warmer locations, it is a candidate for the partially shaded garden. A location with morning sun and afternoon shade is good.

    In areas with colder winters than that of Zone 9, this plant deserves a place in the annual garden where it gives many months of service for a small investment of time and money. Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds love it; deer generally avoid it.

    Give this flavorful culinary sage well-drained soil rich in humus. Compact and thrifty, it is an outstanding accent plant in borders, cut-flower gardens and containers.

    Native to Mexico, Pineapple Sage grows at high elevations in Pine and Oak forests. The species is used medicinally -- such as in herb tea -- to relieve anxiety and treat hypertension. Just smelling the leaves makes us happier.
    10.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Playa Rosa'

    (Pink Beach Autumn Sage) When it blooms from spring into fall, this heat- and chill-tolerant sage is covered with large, two-tone pink flowers that attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. This compact, drought-tolerant beauty also features small, shiny, bright green leaves.


    Pink Beach was selected and developed by Paul Bonine and Greg Shepherd of Xera Plants in Portland. This sun-loving sage tolerates partial shade and greatly appreciates settings with morning sun and afternoon shade. It is an excellent groundcover, border or container plant.

    The first person to bring Autumn Sage to the notice of the horticultural world was Josiah Gregg, after whom the species is named. A pioneer and plant explorer, Gregg discovered the species in Northern Mexico in the mid-19th century.

    Pink Beach is our best small-growing, pink Autumn Sage. Big thanks go to Paul and Greg of Xera as well as Josiah, because we appreciate plant explorers and developers.

    10.50
  • Salvia x jamensis 'California Sunset'

    (California Sunset Hybrid Jame Sage) Entranced is the only word to describe how we felt when we first saw the peachy sunset pastels of this Jame Sage. After growing it for multiple seasons, we are just as impressed by its compact, well-branched form.

    Jame Sages (S. x jamensis spp.) are hybrid members of the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) group, but are often pastel. Native to Mexico and the American Southwest, they occur in areas where Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains.

    Hardy to at least 10 degrees F, California Sunset is also heat tolerant, drought resistant and long blooming. It would look lovely in a mixed planter or perennial border with other sages featuring red, pink and yellow blossoms. Or mass it for a spectacular groundcover. This tough plant loves full sun, but tolerates a bit of shade.

    Highly recommended by butterflies, hummingbirds and gardeners!
    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x jamensis 'Tangerine Ballet'

    (Tangerine Ballet Hybrid Jame Sage) Soft pinkish-orange flowers with contrasting yellow eyes make this Jame Sage look as tasty as sorbet. Hardy to at least 10 degrees F, Tangerine Ballet is also heat tolerant, drought resistant and long blooming-- all marks of Salvias in the closely related Autumn and Mountain Sage group.

    Jame Sage is a cross of Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii), Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) and, possibly, other Salvia species. Determining a Jame Sage's precise parentage can be complicated, because one or both of its Autumn/Mountain sage parents may also be hybrids. This hybrid-of-a-hybrid phenomenon may be the case for Tangerine Ballet, which is one of our taller Jame Sage varieties.

    Native to Mexico and the American Southwest, Jame Sage occurs in areas where the closely related species of Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains.

    Upright in form with leaves that closely resemble the tiny, smooth foliage of its Autumn Sage parent, Tangerine Ballet is perfect massed as a groundcover or in spots calling for small shrubbery, such as path edges. Jame Sage loves full sun, but tolerates a bit of shade.

    Highly recommended by butterflies, honeybees, hummingbirds and gardeners!

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

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Sage Words About Wildlife: Hummingbirds Love Lobelias

Sage Words About Wildlife: Hummingbirds Love Lobelias


Category: Sage Words About Wildlife
Posted: Aug 4, 2014 03:30 AM
Synopsis: Top-10 lists of hummingbird favorites almost always contain Salvia and Lobelia, because each genus is nectar rich and offers many species in bright reds, oranges and pinks. Hummingbirds have a weak sense of smell, but bright colors, such as those of Lobelias, lure them to flowerbeds. They are particularly devoted to the four types grown at Flowers by the Sea.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.

Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.