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Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer'


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  • Attracting Hummingbirds

Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer'



Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information
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Description

(Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia) Slender, hot pink trumpet blossoms of Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia dangle from red flower spikes. They hang over variegated foliage that looks like someone sprayed it with lime, forest green and cream accents.

The Phygelius genus is commonly known as Cape Fuchsia due to its origin in South Africa and its pendulous flowers. Similar to other Phygelius, Lemon Spritzer is long-blooming, heat tolerant and drought resistant.

Lemon Spritzer looks pretty in patio planters and hanging baskets and as a tall groundcover in areas where it is perennial. It returns annually in a broad range of USDA Cold Hardiness Zones and works well as an annual elsewhere.

We thank Ann Elizabeth Detweiler of Albany, Oregon, for hybridizing this unique Cape Fuchsia. Honeybees and hummingbirds buzz straight to it.

Details

Product rating
 
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In stock
4 item(s) available

Common name  
Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchia
USDA Zones  
7 - 10
Size (h/w/fh)  
36"/36"/40"
Exposure  
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type  
Well drained & rich
Water needs  
Average
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Patent #  
PP 24,294
Our price
10.50

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Quantity (4 available)

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

7 - 10
7 - 10
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
36 inches wide
36 inches wide
Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. This is absolutely our favorite. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x jamensis 'Yellow Pink'

    (Yellow Pink Hybrid Jame Sage) Dusty pink with pale yellow throats, the bicolor pastels of this Salvia x jamensis are especially charming up close. 'Yellow Pink' is a compact sage with tiny, smooth foliage.

    Jame Sage (S. x jamensis spp.) is a hybrid member of the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) group of closely related Salvias. However, unlike its parent species, Jame Sage often is pastel.

    Native to Mexico and the American Southwest, Jame Sage occurs in areas where Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains or at private nurseries and universities involved in botanical research.

    Every year, many new Jame Sages enter commercial horticulture. We grow as many as we can, looking for exceptional varieties, but only a few make the cut. Yellow Pink is a petite favorite that comes from one of our Salvia gurus, professional plant breeder Brent Barnes of Riverside, Californiae.

    Yellow Pink Jame Sage is fragrant, long blooming, vigorous, heat tolerant and drought resistant similar to other members of the Autumn/Mountain Sage group.

    Highly recommended!

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Stachys coccinea

    (Red Betony) Heralding from the arid Southwest, this attractive and desirable perennial is one of the best hummingbird plants. Small pastel red/orange flowers make a real impact due to their numbers - this plant is often covered in flowers. And the furry leaves have a mild, fruity fragrance, especially in warm weather.

    This mounding small perennial is native to shady mountain canyons in Arizona and Texas.  This is a fine hardy perennial for shady spots, and even grows in full sun with adequate water.  It can stand drought when established, but does very well with regular garden water.  This plant blooms for us April - October!

    This is another Salvia-like perennial that deserves much greater prominence in our gardens.

    Highly recommended.  The hummers will thank you!

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia spathacea 'Powerline Pink'

    (Giant Hummingbird Sage or Pitcher Sage) Powerline Pink is the largest variety of Salvia spathacea that we grow. Its large, dark pink flowers are surrounded by bracts so furry that they look silvery.

    The Hummingbird Sage species is endemic to California, which means that it originates nowhere else in the wild. According to garden writer Betsy Clebsch, who wrote The New Book of Salvias, the species became a garden plant in the 1970s.

    All varieties of Hummingbird Sage form clumps due to underground runners. This variety spreads slowly. Each clump grows up to 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide producing, sticky, richly scented foliage and thick flower spikes with large clusters of jewel-tone blossoms.

    This shade-loving variety is our best Salvia spathacea for accent planting. It is also an efficient groundcover and useful for edging and borders in woodland, native plant and dry gardens.

    Heat tolerant and drought resistant, this sage is also invaluable for attracting and feeding hummingbirds. During bloom time, which is winter to spring, all our Salvia spathacea sell out in a heartbeat.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

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Container Gardening: 32 Salvias and Companions for Hanging Baskets

Container Gardening: 32 Salvias and Companions for Hanging Baskets


Category: Container Gardening
Posted: Apr 28, 2015 07:16 AM
Synopsis: As summer nears, it's time to prepare hanging baskets for patios, front entries and other locations that lend themselves to an aerial display of lush greenery and colorful blossoms. This year, don't just settle for what is familiar; make room for cascading Salvias and waterwise companion plants. Flowers by the Sea has selected 32 favorite plants that arch, tumble, form globes of bloom and otherwise perform beautifully aloft.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.