Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter


  • Details

  • Cultural Icons

  • Compatible Plants

  • Customer Reviews

  • Send to Friend

  • Additional Information

  • Attracting Hummingbirds

  • Deer Tips

Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter

Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter


Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information

Description

(Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter) Except for the rose red flowers and spectacularly speckled, pineapple-like foliage of Eucomis 'Freckles', this specially priced planter kit is a blissfully true blue mix of Guanjuato Giant Gentian Sage (Salvia patens 'Guanajuato') and Blue Vine Sage (Salvia cacaliifolia).

Container gardening is ideal for balconies, decks, patios, entryways, and small yards. We make the project easier by offering kits that combine plants with similar needs and coordinate harmonious colors and shapes. Each planter collection has a dramatic focus (thriller) and a lovely complement (filler), which may also be combined with a gracefully climbing or trailing species (spiller), such as the Blue Vine Sage in this combo.

Here's more information about FBTS Container Kits.

Container Kit Details
Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter
Feature Attribute
Pot Size Medium
Exposure Shade
Duration Annual
Zone USDA Zone 8-11
Thriller Salvia patens 'Guanajuato'
Spiller Salvia cacaliifolia
Filler Eucomis 'Freckles'
Hummingbirds
Butterflies

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
2 item(s) available

Common name  
Pineapple Lily True Blue Shade Planter
USDA Zones  
8 - 11
Exposure  
Partial shade
Soil type  
Rich and well drained
Water needs  
Average
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
Regular Price: 
31.50
Discounted Package Price: 
27.50




This collection includes the following plants

Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit







Water Needs

Average water
Average water

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Eucomis 'Freckles'

    (Speckled Dwarf Pineapple Lily) The ‘freckles’ on this petite South African plant are the reddish-purple speckles on its long, lance-shaped, olive-green leaves. It flowers from summer to fall. Shaped somewhat like a pineapple with a top-knot of green leaves, the spikes of short, rose-red flowers rise from the center of the plant's fleshy foliage.

    Speckled Dwarf Pineapple Lily is about 10 inches tall to 14 inches wide. It’s heat tolerant, easy to grow in USDA Zones 7 to 10 and a fascinating selection for a border or pathway edging. In cooler zones, you can grow it as a seasonal bedding plant.

    Eucomis are fragrant, water-loving succulent bulbs. They do well in full sun or partial shade. Give them average to ample water and rich soil that drains well. Their leaves may wilt a bit during hot midday temperatures, but they plump up again by the following morning.

    10.50
  • Salvia cacaliifolia

    (Blue Vine Sage) Blooming from mid-summer through late autumn, this semi-hardy herbaceous perennial is adorned with a profusion of true-blue flowers that arch up 12 to 24 inches above its deltoid, grass-green leaves.

    In our mild coastal climate Blue Vine Sage blooms for 8 to 10 months and has become a patch of dazzling blue -- nearly 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide -- in our Salvia garden. It is a fine choice for edging pathways or including in perennial borders. Although it doesn't need lots of water, it tolerates moist ground. For best performance, this plant needs weekly watering, removal of spent flowers and high shade in hot areas. After the threat of frost passes in spring, cut the stems almost down to the ground to keep your patch shapely.
    10.50
  • Salvia patens 'Guanajuato'

    (Guanajuato Giant Gentian Sage) At 3 inches long, the flowers of this Gentian Sage are the largest of any we grow. Guanjuato Giant is also unique for its tall, upright growth and heavily textured foliage.

    Spikes of deep, true blue flowers that rise up to 48 inches tall make this perennial sage a standout in the garden from summer into fall. This Gentian Sage is reliably perennial in USDA Zones 8 to 11. Its spectacular flowers also make it a fine choice as a summer bedding plant in areas with colder winters.

    Guanjuato Giant likes regular watering and rich, well-drained soil. It does fine in full sun or partial shade and can handle moist corners of the yard. Use it as a path edging, border, groundcover or container plant.

    German botanist Karl Hartweg discovered the Salvia patens species in 1838. British horticulturist Graham Stuart Thomas later called it "the best plant in cultivation."

    Although, true blue is not a part of the color spectrum that hummingbirds favor, they are attracted to Gentian Sages especially when mixed with red-flowered sages.

    10.50
There have been no reviews


: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture:
Verify Humanity

*
The code is case-sensitive and must be entered exactly as above.
Container Gardening Basics: Selecting and Arranging Pots

Container Gardening Basics: Selecting and Arranging Pots


Category: Container Gardening
Posted: Jul 16, 2015 07:39 PM
Synopsis: Assembling a new planter with fresh potting soil and young plants is a feel-good activity similar to moving into a new home. Each pot and property is full of promise. Placing a single plant or a grouping in the right size of pot is like selecting a starter home for it that will encourage healthy growth. The type of material a pot is made from also affects development. Flowers by the Sea Online Salvia Nursery explains how to choose correct pot sizes as well as pot styles, sizes, colors and arrangements. Don't miss The Flowerpot Men music video!
Container Gardening Basics: Selecting a Good Potting Mix

Container Gardening Basics: Selecting a Good Potting Mix


Category: Container Gardening
Posted: Jul 11, 2015 04:38 PM
Synopsis: Why is regular garden soil a poor choice for container gardening, and why is sterilized, soilless potting mix better. The term "sterilized" indicates that a potting medium is free of pathogens, weed seed and toxins. "Soilless" means that although it contains organic and inorganic matter, it isn't a garden soil. One of the main reasons to use a soilless mix is that it allows water to drain better in a confined space. Flowers by the Sea explains the basics of potting mixes and why no one recipe fits all needs.
Creating Oases in Dry Yards With FBTS Container Gardens​

Creating Oases in Dry Yards With FBTS Container Gardens​


Category: Container Gardening
Posted: Jul 6, 2015 09:47 AM
Synopsis: Container gardening likely began in ancient Egypt with Pharaoh Ramesses III who created garden cities lined with potted trees and papyrus plants. Ramesses didn't have a mail-order plant nursery like Flowers by the Sea to help him determine what to grow and how to do it. He also didn't have three-day mail delivery. But you don't have minions to help you plan and plant your landscape. So FBTS has designed discounted container kits for a variety of growing conditions, including drought.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.