707 877-1717        Contact Us        Sign in        Everything Salvias Blog
Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Pink Flowered

Pink Flowered

Pink, in all its many shades, is important in garden color schemes; it buffer transitions between stronger colors like dark blues and reds. From hot to pale, pink abounds among Salvias and comes in a broad range of blossom sizes and shapes. Here are some we love.

Products


  • Lepechinia fragrans

    (Island Pitcher Sage) Native to shady canyons on the coast of Southern California's Channel Islands, this threatened species is highly desirable for its ruggedness, its aromatic furry leaves and its spectacular Winter and Spring flowers.
    $7.00
     

  • Lepechinia hastata

    (Pink Hawaiian Pitchersage) Some botanists argue that this shrubby perennial, growing "wild" in many parts of the Hawaiian Islands, may indeed be a human introduction. No matter where it is from originally, it is a surprisingly hardy tropical looking Salvia relative that features large, felted gray arrow shaped (hastate) leaves and intense lavender rose tubular flowers.
    $7.00
     

  • Salvia 'Dancing Dolls'

    (Dancing Dolls Sage) Sages can be such tough plants. Many, such as Salvia 'Dancing Dolls', withstand heat and drought yet have delicate looking blossoms. Dancing Dolls features cream and rose bicolor flowers.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia 'Fancy Dancer'

    (Fancy Dancer Sage) Sages can be such tough plants withstanding heat and drought. Yet so many, including Salvia 'Fancy Dancer' have delicate looking blossoms. This one has bicolor flowers combining light and hot pink tones.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia caespitosa

    (Anatolian Cushion Sage) Rising up only 6 to 8 inches, this is a pixie-sized sage that loves gritty soils. It is perfect for dry gardens with gritty soils in USDA Zones 5 to 9. In fact, it seems to love the colder zones best. We think it is particularly fond of frozen ground in winter, because that helps keep its roots from getting too damp.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia canariensis

    (Canary Island Sage) In areas with mild winters, this spectacular, aromatic Salvia may reach 6 feet tall and 5 feet wide. Its numerous, cloud-like spikes of purple-violet flowers contrast nicely with large, furry leaves.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia carnea

    (Temascaltepec Sage) In full bloom, which is all year in mild climates, this mid-sized Salvia has far more flowers than foliage. Each 1/2-inch-long, bright pink bloom has two dark pink/purple spots and a pair of white stripes. The small, slightly furry leaves add to its soft, pleasing look.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia chiapensis

    (Chiapas Sage) This partial-shade Salvia produces magenta flowers year round for us on the Mendocino Coast. It's compact, free flowering and not bothered by pests whether large or small. It is native to Mexico's coastal mountains at an elevation of 7,000 to 9,500 feet.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia coccinea 'Coral Nymph'

    (Coral Nymph Tropical Sage) What a cutie! This award-winning cultivar of Tropical Sage is short and compact yet has a multitude of pastel salmon flowers larger than those of its bigger cousins. It is perfect for annual flower beds or patio containers.

    $4.50
     

  • Salvia curviflora

    (Pink Tehuacan Sage) Large clusters of big, fuzzy, hot magenta-pink flowers top the elegant foliage of this Mexican sage. It is long blooming beginning in late spring and does well in full sun or partial shade. We want to help spread this rare sage that deserves to be widely planted.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia disermas

    (Transvaal Sage) Growing in partially shaded stream beds and rocky grasslands, this herbaceous perennial from South Africa is showy yet tough as a ground cover or perennial border plant. Its spikes of large, pinkish white flowers bloom from spring through fall.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia dolomitica

    (Pilgrim’s Rest Pink Sage) Spring into summer, this heat-tolerant sage from South Africa produces lilac and white blossoms with profuse, fragrant, gray foliage. It’s the burgundy calyxes, which turn a rusty pink after the flowers blossom, that give this sage part of its common name.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia dorisiana

    (Fruit Scented Sage)  This plant has it all -- big, light-green leaves that are fuzzy soft and large magenta-pink flowers that smell intoxicating and bloom from winter into spring. Fruit Scented Sage is one of the strongest and most deliciously scented plants we have encountered.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia fruticosa

    (Greek Sage) Most of the dried culinary sage sold in the United States is Greek Sage. Frescoes on the island of Crete dated to 1400 BC depict this plant, which was used by the Phoenicians and Greeks for cooking and medicine. It is an ancient and beloved friend of mankind.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Momobana'

    (Pink Makino) The gracefully shaped, two-tone flowers of Pink Makino look like ballerinas in tutus. This shade-loving sage comes from moist, mountain woodlands on the Japanese island of Honshu. In Northern California, it blooms for us in late fall.
    $11.50
     

  • Salvia gravida

    (Gravid Sage) This tender perennial from Michoacán, Mexico, has large, rich magenta flowers that hang from the arching branches in clusters up to 12 inches long. Growing up to 5 feet tall, this sage offers an unforgettable display when in bloom.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Cold Hardy Pink'

    (Cold Hardy Pink Autumn Sage) Medium creamy-hot pink flowers and contrasting, red bracts make this Autumn Sage stand out. This drought tolerant Autumn Sage from Northern Texas is also compact, rugged, heat tolerant and capable of handling Zone 5 chill. Yes - Zone 5!
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Dark Dancer'

    (Dark Dancer Autumn Sage) The clear, light raspberry flowers of this largish Autumn Sage bloom from spring into summer. It makes a colorful, tall groundcover and looks lovely on slopes. This variety was discovered as a sport in the Aptos, California nursery of Nevin Smith.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Pink Preference'

    (Pink Preference Autumn Sage) Two-tone, hot pink flowers and contrasting, nearly black bracts make this Autumn Sage stand out. This drought tolerant Autumn Sage from Central Texas is also compact, rugged, heat tolerant and capable of handling Zone 6 chill.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Playa Rosa'

    (Pink Beach Autumn Sage) When it blooms from spring into fall, this heat- and chill-tolerant sage is covered with large, two-tone pink flowers that attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. This compact, drought-tolerant beauty also features small, shiny, bright green leaves.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Plum Wine'

    (Plum Wine Autumn Sage) Frilly, lavender-tinged, pink flowers with a pretty white dot at the throat make this another outstanding contribution from North Carolina nurseryman Richard Dufresne.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Señorita Leah'

    (Delicate Lady Autumn Sage)The hot pink skirt and reddish throat of this sage's flowers draw the eye. Although Señorita Leah does well in full sun, the color of its flowers intensifies with a bit of shade. Compact and floriferous, it blooms from spring to fall.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Stormy Pink'

    (Stormy Pink Autumn Sage) The dramatic name of this floriferous Autumn Sage is due to the calyxes cupping its smoky apricot-pink blossoms. Some gardeners report gray calyxes and others say dark plum. But for whatever reason, the Stormy Pink that we grow on our Northern California coastal farm has green calyxes with dark stripes.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Teresa'

    (Teresa's Autumn Sage) Powder pink and white bicolor flowers make this sage look like an over-large bridal bouquet with densely leafed, dark green, mounding foliage. This sage appreciates some shade, but can withstand heat and moderate drought.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Wild Thing'

    (Wild Thing Autumn Sage) Native to West Texas where it was collected in the wild, this cold-tolerant sage has perky, upright flowers that are coral pink with a darker throat. Overall, it is a vigorous, upright plant with dense, deep green foliage. Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds love it.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii x karwinskii 'Brent's'

    (Brent's Fall Hybrid Sage) Although hybrids involving Salvia gregii (Autumn Sage) are common, but this one is exceptionally tall, attractive and long blooming. Its other parent is the tall, tubular-flowered Roseleaf Sage.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia greggii x lemmonii 'Raspberry Royale'

    (Raspberry Royale Sage) Honeybees and hummingbirds love this sage, which stands out for its compact habit and large raspberry-pink flowers. Richard Dufresne developed this hardy hybrid that does well in full sun or partial shade and blooms spring through fall.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia hierosolymitana

    (Jerusalem Sage) This lovely herbaceous perennial is native to Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and the West Bank. Its clear pink flowers change at times to a pink highlighted with violet lines and dots. Prominent glandular hairs on the buds, bracts and floral stems exude a fragrance that is delightful on a warm day.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia indica

    (Two-lip Spotted Sage) Shaped like an open parrot's beak, the upper lip of this petite yet dramatic sage is lilac while the lower lip is dark violet and white with spots. The whorled flower spikes rise up from clumps of large, oval, grassy green leaves with scalloped edges.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia involucrata 'Bethellii'

    (Roseleaf Sage)  A late but glorious bloomer, Roseleaf Sage starts producing hot pink blossoms in winter and continues into spring -- growing more spectacular every day -- unless cut down to the ground by hard frost.


    $8.50
     

  • Salvia involucrata 'Hadspen'

    (Hadspen Roseleaf Sage)  If you plant this sage in a mild-climate area where hummingbirds overwinter, you'll likely find hummers zinging back and forth among its magenta pink blossoms from fall through spring.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia involucrata var puberula 'Hidalgo'

    (Hidalgo Roseleaf Sage) The earliest flowering, hardiest and strongest growing cultivar of its species, Hidalgo Roseleaf Sage starts blooming in June on the Northern California coast. It continues, and becomes more spectacular every day, until cut down by hard frost. In our mild climate, it never stops blooming some years.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia iodantha

    (Scandent Mexican Sage) Here's another winter-blooming hummingbird magnet for gardens in mild climates. This one is scandent, which means it is a climber and needs support. Its abundant, purple-to-magenta flowers are velvety and 6 inches long.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia iodantha 'Louis Saso'

    (Big Leaf Scandent Mexican Sage) Bigger leaves, larger, looser flowers and pink petioles -- the tiny stemlets connecting leaves to stems -- differentiate this this clone from its parent plant Salvia iodantha. A winter-blooming perennial, it's covered with velvety, 8-inch-long, magenta blossoms from fall into winter.
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia karwinskii x involucrata v. puberula

    (Gray Roseleaf Sage) The University of California at Berkeley developed this hybrid from Karwinskii's Sage (Salvia karwinskii) and a variety of Roseleaf Sage (Salvia involucrata v. puberula) collected in Mexico by North Carolina nurseryman Richard Dufresne.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia lanceolata

    (Rusty Sage)  Named for its leaves shaped like the tips of lances, this nearly care-free, evergreen sage from South Africa has enchanting rusty rose flowers that bloom from fall (spring in its native land) into winter.
    $8.50
     



Have questions?
Contact us
Contact us

Product Filtering Filter your selection by:

Coldest Zone
  • 3 (1)
  • 5 (5)
  • 6 (7)
  • 7 (35)
  • 8 (21)
+ More
Mature height
Mature spread
Soil type
+ More
Water needs

Reviews


My Plectranthus ciliatus 'Troy's Gold' arrived in beautiful condition. It's multi-colored foliage is far more complex than any photos I have seen. I love it.
Mrs. Alicia Rudnicki
Jul 30, 2014