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Plectranthus amboinicus 'Nicodemus'


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Plectranthus amboinicus 'Nicodemus'
Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Description

(Variegated Cuban Oregano) The thick and very fragrant leaves of this spreading plant are marked in at least three shades of green with an irregular white margin. A short trailer, enjoy this plant on a warm day for the spicy, Oregano-like scent of the leaves.

Growing to less than a foot high and spreading up to two feet, this is a perfect ground cover or spiller-over-the-edge.  The small lavender flowers are beautiful and fragrant.

Use this fine plant in a bright place in your home, or outside in partial shade.  A bit of morning sun will bring out the variegation. It shines as a container plant, and is easy to grow.  Who could ask for more?

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
4 item(s) available

Common name
Variegated Cuban Oregano
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
12"/36"/18"
Exposure
Partial shade
Soil type
Rich
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes!
Our price
$7.00


Options

Quantity (4 available)

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full shade
Full shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Indoor plant
Indoor plant
Fragrant
Fragrant

Growing Habit

9 - 10
9 - 10
12 inches tall
12 inches tall
36 inches wide
36 inches wide
Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
  • Asplenium bulbiferum

    (Mother Fern) Ferns are low-maintenance plants that add a tropical look to the Salvia garden. This one grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11. Mother Fern, which has a graceful, arching look and finely cut fronds, loves partial to full shade and lots of water. This makes it an excellent choice for damp, shady Southeastern gardens.

    Due to its arching nature, Mother Fern only measures 24 inches tall and looks particularly pretty with short Asian woodland sages and Salvias for warmer winter climes, such as the Rosy Bract Sage (Salvia rubiginosa), which has cool, violet-blue flowers. In addition to ample water, Mother Fern needs rich soil.

    The bulbiferum appellation of its scientific name, refers to the fern’s production of plantlets on the tips of its fronds. These babies drop off and grow into new plants, which explains the common name of Mother Fern. Another common name for this fern is Spleenwort. Whereas wort is Old English for “plant,” spleen refers to the fern’s ancient role as a medicinal plant.

    In the wilds of its Australian and New Zealand homelands, this deer-resistant plant grows as an epiphyte on trees and fern trunks as well as a rooted plant along shady rock croppings and waterways. Epiphytes don’t harm their host plants, because they only rely on tree trunks and other structures for support. When epiphytic instead of rooted in the soil, ferns consume nutrients and moisture drifting in the air. Tarra Bulga National Park in Victoria, Australia, is home to many Mother Ferns.

    $8.00
  • Centradenia floribunda

    (Spanish Shawl) This is one of these plants that stops most people in their tracks. The deep purple/pink, standout flowers are show stoppers in and of themselves - but the furry leaves, which start green and mature to a bronze red are unique and unforgettable.

    Use this native of Colombia in a large container, a hanging basket or as a ground cover in mild climates.  It blooms almost nonstop during the growing season.  Well worth growing as an annual in colder Zones - there is nothing like this plant!

    Here is a link to an article about this plant from the San Francisco Chronicle.

    $7.50
  • Plectranthus 'Emerald Mist'

    (Emerald Mist Creeping Charlie) The leaves of this plant have a base color of mottled mid-green, over which lays a silver patterning. The base of the leaves and the petioles are dark purple, as are the furry undersides. This is the smallest Plectranthus we grow, suitable for small pots inside or out.

    Use this one as a small scale ground cover, or in mixed planters.  The finest leaf color comes with good light, but anything but morning sun will damage the leaves.

    This is a rock-solid House Plant, one that survives.

    $7.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Plectranthus amboinicus 'Silver Curl'

    (Silver Curl Cuban Oregano) The thick, furry, silvery and very fragrant leaves of this spreading plant are curled and twisted - a charming variation to the common form of this species. This is a seedling from an interspecific cross that regressed - almost - to one of the parents. A short trailer, enjoy this plant where the spicy, Oregano-like scent the leaves give off on a warm day.

    This species is an important medicinal herb in many parts of the world, and is known by a plethora of common names:

    • Cuban oregano,
    • Spanish thyme,
    • Orégano Brujo (Puerto Rico),
    • Indian Borage,
    • Húng chanh (Vietnam),
    • Big Thyme (Grenada),
    • Mexican thyme,
    • Mexican mint,
    • Queen of herbs,
    • Three-in-one herb,
    • Allherb,
    • Mother of herbs.

    Growing to less than a foot high and spreading (or cascading) up to two feet, this is a perfect ground cover or spiller-over-the-edge.  The small lavender flowers are beautiful and fragrant.

    Use this fine plant in a bright place in your home, or outside in partial shade.  It does well with morning sun, with attention to its water needs.
    $7.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Plectranthus argentatus 'Silver Mist’

    (Silver Mist Spur Flower) When we first discovered this species, we mistook it for a Salvia. Growing in front of the US Post Office in Mendocino, California, it was glorious and in full flower one September morning. Returning months later for seed, it had gone dormant in the fashion of a herbaceous perennial. It was not until the next year, when we grew out the batch of seedlings from which this superior clone was selected that we positively identified the plant.

    The thick, deeply ribbed and white-furry leaves can grow to four inches long, and in the ground the plant can grow to 5 by 5 feet. It is generally smaller in pots, where it grows well inside or out. The individual flowers are small but exquisitely marked and very numerous, starting in late Summer and continuing all Winter long.

    Use this fine plant in a bright place in your home, or outside in partial shade.  It shines as a container plant, and is easy to grow.  Who could ask for more?

    $7.00
  • Plectranthus barbatus var. grandis 'White Rhino'

    (White Rhino Indian Coleus) The largest Plectranthus we grow, both in stature and in leaf size - growing to 3 feet plus tall, with leaves 4 inches long and 3 inches wide. The intricate three-color variegation is enhanced by the golden glow of the new growing leaves. This is a spectacular plant in all ways.

    Give this one plenty or room, and no direct sun.  Not picky about soil richness or water, it does need good drainage. From the mountains of India and Nepal, it was until fairly recently considered to be in the genus Coleus.

    This plant is used in Ayurvedic medicine for a wide variety of maladies.
    $7.00
  • Plectranthus ciliatus 'Troy's Gold'

    (Troy's Gold Spur Flower) An absolutely amazing blend of colors in the leaves of this plant - golden yellow with irregular mid-green blotches on top, velvety purple on the underside. New growth is purplish as are the strong stems, making for a very eye-catching display.

    Growing to about a foot high and spreading up to three feet, this is a perfect ground cover or spiller-over-the-edge.  The small white flowers have lavender spots - a bonus.

    Use this fine plant in a bright place in your home, or outside in partial shade.  It shines as a container plant, and is easy to grow.  Who could ask for more?
    $7.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Plectranthus neochilus

    (Lobster Flower) This stunning flower, which literally covers the plant for an extended period in the Summer and Fall, is found on ONE TOUGH PLANT. It grows in Southern Africa on the edge of the beach, where it occasionally gets covered with salt water. Heat, drought, sun, shade - this one takes it all. Snails avoid it, deer won't eat it, and it has flowers for us nearly all year. No, it does not iron shirts.

    Now, what does it like best?  Partial shade, average soil and weekly water.  Not very much for something so spectacular!

    A perfect plant for a bright window, sun room or a shaded Summer patio, this Salvia relative will cascade from its container with just basic care.  Perfect for a hanging basket.  We rate this as an easy house plant, one that you can depend on.


    $7.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Plectranthus parviflorus 'Sapphire Dream'

    (Sapphire Dream Spur Flower) Bright green furry leaves edged in white make this a real standout in any garden. Easier to grow than any other variegated shrubby Plectranthus cultivar: if you have not had success in the past with this type you will be very pleased with Sapphire Dream. The deep violet flowers on large spikes are richly colored and profuse. We are very excited to be offering this unique plant.

    Growing to two feet high and spreading up to two feet, this is an ideal small shrub or edge plant.  It has a very long blooming season, and is attractive in or out of bloom.

    Use this fine plant in a bright place in your home, or outside in partial shade.  A bit of morning sun will bring out the variegation. It shines as a container plant, and is easy to grow.  Who could ask for more?
    $7.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Plectranthus zuluensis

    (Zulu Spur Flower) Heavily veined, green foliage with burgundy stems forms a sharp contrast with Zulu Spurflower's whorls of pale violet, tubular flowers. The large, oval-shaped leaves of this heat-resistant plant have tooth-like, serrated edges.

    Tall and softly shrubby, this Plectranthus is native to South Africa's eastern coast stretching north to the KwaZulu-Natal provinces. In its native forest setting, it grows on shady hillsides or in deep gorges along stream banks. So, although drought tolerant, Zulu Spur Flower thrives with regular watering based on local conditions.

    In warm zones, where it is a tender perennial that may return annually, it is useful as a groundcover, border or edging where erect form is needed. In USDA Cold Hardiness Zones with frosty winters, it is a fine houseplant or outdoor annual. Give it well-drained soil rich in humus.

    Zulu Spur Flower was introduced to horticulture in 1934 and entered cultivation at South Africa's Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden in 1977. Plant development can be such a slow process as exemplified by the fact that this Plectranthus was first collected by English naturalist and traveler William Tyrer Gerrard (1831-1866). Gerrard's passion for plant exploration eventually caused him to die from a complication of malaria called blackwater fever.

    In Greek, plectron means spur and anthos is flower. So the genus name, Plectranthus, means spur flower and is related to the tiny spur at the base of blossoms in some species. French botanist Charles Louis L'Heritier de Brutelle named the genus in 1788 after observing one species. Despite few Plectranthus having spurs, many species are commonly called Spur Flowers.
    $7.00
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Book Review: The Southern African Plectranthus

Book Review: The Southern African Plectranthus


Category: Book Reviews
Posted: Jun 3, 2014 10:28 PM
Synopsis: Ernst van Jaarsveld is a South African botanist, plant explorer and writer. He is also conservatory curator at Kirstenbosch National Garden, which is located at the base of Cape Town’s magnificent Table Mountain. The conservatory houses plants from South Africa’s various biomes ranging from desert to alpine forest. These include species from the shade-loving Plectranthus genus, which is known for its colorful foliage. Flowers by the Sea grows a number of Plectranthus.
Plant Safari: Growing Colorful Plectranthus Indoors

Plant Safari: Growing Colorful Plectranthus Indoors


Category: Salvia Companions: Plectranthus
Posted: Nov 20, 2013 08:42 PM
Synopsis:

Easy to grow and marked by dramatic foliage, plants in the Plectranthus genus are becoming favorites for indoor gardeners. Many are ideal for hanging baskets or other elegantly cascading displays of foliage. Others are tall and shrubby. Some bloom abundantly in shades of blue, lavender, pink and white. All do well in USDA Cold Hardiness Zones 9 to 11. We'll cover a variety of ideas for interior decorating with Plectranthus in our upcoming Quick Digs series on indoor greenscaping with the genus. Meanwhile, here are 20 species to consider

Annual Salvias and Plectranthus for Shady Window Boxes and Patios

Annual Salvias and Plectranthus for Shady Window Boxes and Patios


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Apr 16, 2013 11:05 AM
Synopsis: Not all window boxes or patio planters are blessed with full sunlight. Yet partial shade -- sometimes referred to as dappled sunlight -- or a combination of morning light and afternoon shade, is just right for some of the most beautiful annual Salvias that bloom in summer. Add in the lushly colored and textured foliage of Plectranthus and you have a pleasing combination to brighten shady decks or windows at locations facing north, east and south. Here are 10 colorful choices.
Pleasing Plectranthus: Exotic Salvia Relatives with Colorful Foliage

Pleasing Plectranthus: Exotic Salvia Relatives with Colorful Foliage


Category: Salvia Companions: Plectranthus
Posted: Jan 17, 2013 11:49 AM
Synopsis: Tropical and subtropical plants with spectacular foliage often find their way indoors in cooler, temperate climates. That's the way it is with the Plectranthus genus. Perhaps you know its most widely grown species, Swedish Ivy (Plectranthus australis), which was the darling of hanging baskets in 1970s' fern bars and is native to South Africa. But are you familiar with the other hundreds of species in the genus, which is mostly native to the southern hemisphere. Plectranthuses can be found in sub-Saharan and Southern Africa -- especially South Africa -- as well as Asia, Australia, Indonesia and Hawaii.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.