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Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix


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Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix

Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix


Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information

Description

(Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix) By growing a combo of these bright Hot Poker Plants, you provide excellent nutrition for hummingbirds and butterflies. The FBTS Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix, combines three plants each of four dwarf varieties at a discounted group price.

Kniphofias are commonly known as red hot pokers (as in the fireplace tool) and torch lilies due to their fiery colors. The adaptable Kniphofia genus is native to South Africa where it grows in a moderate climate. However, the plants we've mixed here are cold hardy as well as heat tolerant.

Experienced gardeners often mass plants of the same color and species in uneven numbers for a more natural look. This full sun combo, which is reliably perennial in USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 6 to 9, contains:

• 3 Mango Popsicle Hot Poker Plants (Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle')

• 3 Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle')

• 3 Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Poco Red') and

• 3 Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker (Kniphofia 'Poco Orange').

Oregon's innovative Terra Nova Nurseries developed the Popsicle and Poco series, which are longer blooming and have tidier grass-like foliage than their parent plants. Beginning in 2011, we grew dozens of the new Kniphofias to find that Terra Nova's hybrids led the pack.

These plants are easy to grow and maintain, demanding little fertilizer and only average supplemental watering based on local conditions. They grow in many kinds of soil and are unpalatable to deer. What's not to love about them?

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name  
Fiery Kniphofia Wildlife Sun Mix
USDA Zones  
6 - 9
Exposure  
Full sun
Soil type  
Any well drained
Water needs  
Average
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
Regular Price: 
138.00
Discounted Package Price: 
121.00




This collection includes the following plants

Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant

Growing Habit

6 - 9
6 - 9




Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. This is absolutely our favorite. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Orange Vanilla Popsicle'

    (Orange Vanilla Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its unusual, two-tone color that goes with anything. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    13.50

    OUT OF STOCK

    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Papaya Popsicle'

    (Papaya Popsicle Hot Poker) Terra Nova Nursery's Popsicle Series of dwarf Hot Poker perennials are reminiscent of the kind of frozen treats designed to look like rocket ships and fireworks. The blossoms of Papaya Popsicle are a bright orange-red and gold.

    Tidy clumps of grassy, green foliage surround Papaya Popsicle's flower spikes. It is a full-sun perennial that appreciates regular watering but is drought resistant. We grow a number of Popsicle Kniphofias and can attest to their super-long bloom time, which keeps butterflies and hummingbirds busy in our gardens.

    Aside from being wildlife friendly, this easy-to-grow Hot Poker is cold tolerant and works well in Salvia gardens due to low demand for both water and fertilizer. Sometimes Kniphofias are referred to as Torch Lilies due to their shape as well as their fiery look, which helps light up the landscape -- especially when mixed with hot-colored Salvias.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its bright, neutral color that goes with anything. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have plant.

    11.50
  • Kniphofia 'Poco Orange'

    (Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Orange' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle' when in bloom.

    Hot Poker is native to southern Africa. Oregon's innovative Terra Nova Nurseries developed both of these hybrids.

    Similar to Terra Nova's Popsicle series of Hot Poker plants, the new Poco series features tidy clumping of grassy, green foliage from which bright, long blooming flower spikes arise. This one is especially attractive to hummingbirds and doesn't appeal to deer.

    We grow a number of Terra Nova Kniphofias and can attest to their super-long bloom times. All are full-sun perennials that appreciate regular watering yet are drought resistant.

    Aside from being wildlife friendly, this easy-to-grow perennial tolerates cold and heat. Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker works well in Salvia gardens due to its low demand for both water and fertilizer.

    Sometimes Kniphofias are referred to as Torch Lilies due to their shape as well as their fiery look, which helps light up the landscape -- especially when mixed with hot-colored Salvias.

    FBTS is growing an increasing number of Salvia companions. Poco Orange, which forms eye-catching groundcover, is one of our favorites.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Kniphofia 'Poco Red'

    (Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Red' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is about two inches shorter than the already petite Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'.

    Hot Poker is native to southern Africa. Oregon's innovative Terra Nova Nurseries developed both of these hybrids.

    Similar to Terra Nova's Popsicle series of Hot Poker plants, the new Poco series features tidy clumping of grassy, green foliage from which bright, long blooming flower spikes arise. This one is especially attractive to butterflies whereas Redhot Popsicle also attracts hummingbirds. Neither one appeals to deer.

    Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker is a full-sun perennial that appreciates regular watering yet is drought resistant. We grow a number of Terra Nova Kniphofias and can attest to their super-long bloom times.

    Aside from being wildlife friendly, this easy-to-grow perennial tolerates cold and heat. It works well in Salvia gardens due to its low demand for both water and fertilizer.

    Sometimes Kniphofias are referred to as Torch Lilies due to their shape as well as their fiery look, which helps light up the landscape -- especially when mixed with hot-colored Salvias.

    FBTS is growing an increasing number of Salvia companions. Poco Red, which forms eye-catching groundcover, is one of our favorites.

    11.50
  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    In 2011 and 2012 we grew dozens of the new Kniphofia varieties, and only a few stood out from the pack. We love this one for its intensel color that really stands out in a crowd. One of our nursery friends in Portland, Oregon said that it continued to bloom through January, even though the foliage was covered with a foot of snow.

    We don't grow many non-Salvias, and when we do it has to be special. This is one of those very, very good new plants. A must have.

    11.50
  • Salvia microphylla 'Honey Rose'

    (Honey Rose Mountain Sage) So dark that they almost seem black, the stems of this Mountain Sage add drama to flowers the color of creamy tomato soup. The lush, mid-green foliage has distinctive ribbing and is stiffly upright; it makes a strong statement when grouped with soft, rounded Salvias.

    Honey Rose has long been grown in Southern California due to its heat and drought resistance. Mountain Sages are habituated to dry conditions in their native lands of the Southwest and Mexico.

    Honey Rose isn’t picky about the fertility or loaminess of its soil, but needs good drainage. Grow it in full sun to partial shade. It does well in a dry garden but is equally comfortable with regular watering.

    At 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide, this bushy sage is a good addition to the landscape as a border, edging for a pathway, a screen or background planting. Honey Rose also does well in containers. Honeybees and hummingbirds enjoy it. However, as with most sages, deer just say no.
    10.50
  • Salvia regla 'Royal'

    (Orange Mountain Sage) Coahuila, Mexico, is home to many fine Salvias, including the smallest variety of Salvia regla that we grow. This one averages about 3 feet tall and wide.

    This fragrant, compact Salvia regla has tidy foliage and large, orange flowers that bloom from summer into fall in USDA Zones 7 to 10. The absolutely unique characteristic of this variety is its bright orange bracts that even turn the heads of longtime Salvia enthusiasts.


    A native of the Chisos Mountains in Southwestern Texas and of Mexico from Coahuila to Oaxaca, Salvia regla is powerfully heat tolerant and fragrant. Although it appreciates average watering based on local conditions, the species does well in waterwise gardens. Give it full sun and well-drained soil. Grow it as a screen, shrub border or background plant. This is a favorite in native gardens and dry gardens.

    Hummingbirds love this species, which has become an important nectar source for their southbound, autumn migration to the tropics. Butterflies also visit. So it's almost impossible to keep this plant in stock when in bloom.

    NOTE: Theses are slow to propagate, and generally take at least 8 weeks for an appropriate plant to be grown.

    10.50
  • Salvia spathacea 'Elk Rose'

    (Elk Rose Hummingbird Sage) Dusky pastel, rose-toned flowers with burgundy stamens are surrounded by silvery, velvety bracts in this unusual variety of the native California species Salvia spathacea. It is an FBTS cultivar developed through several generations of breeding.

    A setting with morning sun and afternoon shade is optimal for Hummingbird Sages, including Elk Rose, which is our most sun-tolerant variety and can handle conditions ranging from full light to partial shade.

    Native California Salvias mostly don't bloom during summer. However, Elk Rose flowers from winter through summer. It is one of our best plants for growing with other non-native, xeric species that are summer bloomers.

    Although ideal for dry gardens, Elk Rose tolerates regular garden watering. It also offers rapid growth, heat resistance and sticky, richly scented basal foliage. As with its species overall, it is a hummingbird magnet and a fine groundcover. Elk Rose reaches up to three feet tall and spreads at least four feet across. Its clumping growth spreads by underground runners but isn't invasive.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia spathacea 'Powerline Pink'

    (Giant Hummingbird Sage or Pitcher Sage) Powerline Pink is the largest variety of Salvia spathacea that we grow. Its large, dark pink flowers are surrounded by bracts so furry that they look silvery.

    The Hummingbird Sage species is endemic to California, which means that it originates nowhere else in the wild. According to garden writer Betsy Clebsch, who wrote The New Book of Salvias, the species became a garden plant in the 1970s.

    All varieties of Hummingbird Sage form clumps due to underground runners. This variety spreads slowly. Each clump grows up to 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide producing, sticky, richly scented foliage and thick flower spikes with large clusters of jewel-tone blossoms.

    This shade-loving variety is our best Salvia spathacea for accent planting. It is also an efficient groundcover and useful for edging and borders in woodland, native plant and dry gardens.

    Heat tolerant and drought resistant, this sage is also invaluable for attracting and feeding hummingbirds. During bloom time, which is winter to spring, all our Salvia spathacea sell out in a heartbeat.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia spathacea 'Yellow"

    (Yellow Hummingbird Sage or Yellow Pitcher Sage) A rare yellow Salvia spathacea discovered in an oak woodland by Santa Barbara Botanic Garden volunteer Avis Keedy produces the seedlings for these vigorous sages.

    To produce Salvia spathacea 'Yellow' plants we select only Salvia spathacea 'Avis Keedy' seedlings that develop into plants without red pigment. Most of the plants grown from this breeding stock bear flowers in the yellow range. But these are unbloomed seedlings, and are not guaranteed to have yellow flowers.

    Most types of Hummingbird Sage (also called Pitcher Sage) yield flowers in varying shades of pink to magenta. Depending on the cultivar, bracts range from reddish-green to reddish-gray. In contrast, Yellow Hummingbird Sage has bright green bracts and leaves. Its foliage is also less lobed than that of red-pigmented cultivars.

    Hummingbird Sage is native to California and originates nowhere else in the wild. It didn't begin appearing in gardens until the 1970s. All varieties create excellent, long blooming groundcover, because their underground runners form clumps. They're also known for fuzzy, sticky, richly scented foliage and thick, sturdy flower spikes.

    Heat tolerant and drought resistant, Hummingbird Sage works well in dry gardens as well as ones that receive average watering. Plant it in rich, well-drained soil and a location with full sun to partial shade. Morning sun and afternoon shade is a good combination.

    Similar to other types of Hummingbird Sage, Salvia spathacea 'Yellow' is a rich source of nectar for hummingbirds.

    11.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x 'Alegria Light Pink'

    (Light Pink Joy Sage) Salvia x ‘Alegría Light Pink’ is one of the most vigorous new plants at Flowers by the Sea. Its light pink flowers are supported by handsome burgundy and olive green calyxes.

    A hybrid of Salvia dichlamys and S. microphylla, it has remarkable vigor and more flowers than either parent. The tall spikes and large, showy flowers are a hummingbird's dream.

    This full-sun sage is adaptable to many kinds of well-drained soil and grows well where winters are slightly chilly to mild. Give it an average amount of supplemental watering if local rainfall is insufficient.  Suitable as an annual in colder Zones, as it grows to a large size very rapidly.

    This new introduction is in its first season at our farm. However, we are so impressed with its strength, superior growth characteristics and good looks that we've decided to share it with you now.

    Joy Sage is an introduction from plant explorer Roland Uria, an agronomy professor at Argentina's University of Buenos Aires. Thanks, Professor Uria.

    10.50
    New!
  • Salvia x 'Christine Yeo'

    (Christine Yeo Sage) A chance hybrid of two Mexican sages --Salvia microphylla and S. chamaedryoides -- Christine Yeo Sage is long blooming and features deep purple flowers with white eyes.

    Heat tolerant, cold hardy and drought resistant, this well-branched subshrub blooms like crazy and has deep green, rose-like leaves. It originated in horticulture writer Christine Yeo's garden in England. 

    This is an ideal Salvia for borders, edging, groundcover or entryway containers. Honeybees love Christine Yeo Sage, but deer avoid it.

    Highly recommended!

    10.50
  • Salvia x 'Phyllis' Fancy'

    (Phyllis' Fancy Sage) The parentage of this lavender-flowered hybrid sage is unknown. However, it may be a cross between Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha) and Chiapas Sage (S. chiapensis).

    Phyllis' Fancy comes from the Arboretum at the University of California, Santa Cruz. It is similar to other S. leucantha hybrids we grow at Flowers by the Sea, but is the largest plant in this group.

    The foot long flower spikes are cupped by bicolor, green and purple calyxes. This is a late bloomer, but keeps on giving until harsh frost sets in, which hummingbirds appreciate. A full-sun perennial, Phyllis' Fancy is a good choice for large borders or as an accent plant.

    10.50
  • Salvia x 'Big Swing'

    (Big Swing Sage) With its large, cobalt blue flowers displayed on strong, wiry, branched stems, this eye-catching sage wins the FBTS "best of class" designation for being our top Big Leaf Sage (Salvia macrophylla).

    Garden writer Betsy Clebsch developed Big Swing, which is a cross between Big Leaf Sage and Arrowleaf Sage (S. sagitata). Its flower spikes rise well above handsome foliage with large, furry, arrowhead-shaped leaves that look almost tropical.

    Use this heat-tolerant plant to bring a lush look to a damp corner of your garden or in mixed patio containers.  Give it rich, well-drained soil and plenty of water for a long bloom season.

    Big Swing comes highly recommended by butterflies, but deer leave it alone.

    10.50
There have been no reviews


Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens

Divine Salvias & Companions for Hell-Strip Gardens


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: May 30, 2015 08:59 AM
Synopsis: On a hot day, when struggling to break up compacted, weedy soil along a curb or another hellishly difficult strip of land, you may feel like you are descending into a horticultural inferno with a garden fork. But take heart and drink lots of ice water, because the results of your work may prove divine in a year or two. Some gardeners call these drought-resistant projects “hell strip” gardens, a name coined by garden writer and designer Lauren Springer Ogden. Flowers by the Sea offers ideas for four different hell strips based on USDA Plant Hardiness Zones.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.