Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Salvia Companions

Or for fast & easy comprehensive searches visit The Salvia Findertm

Salvia Companions

Similar to many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae), sages (Salvia spp.) aren't demanding. Most are low-fuss plants that are easy to grow if placed in the right location. This list suggests Salvia companion plants, many of which are also low-fuss, mint family members. They add attractive variety to the Salvia garden.

The growing requirements for any plant depend on the temperature range, soil, elevation, sunshine, moisture level and other features of the plant's native land. Great companions have similar cultural needs. So when selecting companion plants, it's necessary to consider whether their needs are compatible with those of the sages you plan to grow.

Gardeners and writers often refer to the Salvia genus as being heat tolerant and drought resistant. Although this is true of many species, there are ones that need regular watering and some that like ample moisture.

Similarly, some sages need partial shade at some point during the day whereas others almost seem to shout 'Bring on the sun; bring on the heat!' The moisture level of shady areas is another consideration. Plants that need ample water are unlikely to grow well in dry shade whereas damp shade won't do for dry garden shade plants.

This list of companions contains plants for dry, regular and damp gardens as well as for full sun and partial shade. Compare the plant descriptions -- from cold hardiness to bloom seasons -- with those for your sages and you will create companionable relationships in the garden.

Plants


  • Deppea splendens

    (Chiapas Golden Fuchsia) Cool, moist and partially shady -- those are the conditions that this tall, rare shrub loves. Once native to the mountain cloud forests of Mexico's southernmost state, Chiapas, Golden Fuchsia in 1986 became extinct in the wild and now is primarily grown by botanical gardens.

    15.00
     


  • Dicliptera suberecta

    (Uruguayan Firecracker Plant) Mint-green foliage felted with a covering of fine hairs provides a cooling backdrop to the hot orange tubular flowers of this long-blooming member of the acanthus family (Acanthaceae).

    9.00
     


  • Echeandia texensis

    (Texas Craglily) Echeandia texensis shines in many ways. First, the delicate looking yet tough flowers are a rich shade of gold. Other stellar traits include its ability to tolerate clay soils, heat, a moderate amount of winter cold and drought.

    10.50
     


  • Echium wildpretii

    (Tower of Jewels) Houston, we are ready for blastoff! Excuse us, but the floriferous Tower of Jewels is so huge that it looks like a model rocket rising up from a columnar launch pad of narrow-leafed, silvery foliage.

    10.50
     


  • Erigeron glaucus 'Olga'

    (California Seaside Daisy) Native to the sea-facing cliffs of California, this sturdy mat-forming plant is a delight for bees and butterflies. A full sun, drought resistant plant in coastal locations, it grows in hot inland locations in partial shade and average watering.

    10.50
     


  • Eucomis 'Freckles'

    (Speckled Dwarf Pineapple Lily) The ‘freckles’ on this petite South African plant are the reddish-purple speckles on its long, lance-shaped, olive-green leaves. From summer to fall, short, rose-red flower spikes rise up from the center of this exotic foliage.

    10.50
     


  • Iris pallida 'Variegata'

    (Dalmation Iris) Bearded Iris are always a welcome sight with their stately height, ruffled flowers and broad blades. This variegated cultivar of Dalmation Iris has spectacular gray-green blades with pale creamy yellow stripes.

    11.00
     


  • Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle'

    (Mango Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Orange Vanilla Popsicle'

    (Orange Vanilla Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds & honeybees, and attract butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    13.50
     


    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Papaya Popsicle'

    (Papaya Popsicle Hot Poker) Terra Nova Nursery's Popsicle Series of dwarf Hot Poker perennials are reminiscent of the kind of frozen treats designed to look like rocket ships and fireworks. The blossoms of Papaya Popsicle are a bright orange-red and gold.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle'

    (Pineapple Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Orange'

    (Poco Orange Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Orange' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Mango Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Red'

    (Poco Red Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Red' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is about two inches shorter than the already petite Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'.

    11.50
     


  • Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow'

    (Poco Yellow Dwarf Hot Poker) Flowers by the Sea is the first U.S. nursery to grow Kniphofia 'Poco Yellow' -- a dwarf Hot Poker that is several inches shorter than the Kniphofia 'Pineapple Popsicle' when in bloom.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Kniphofia 'Redhot Popsicle'

    (Redhot Popsicle Hot Poker) This genus has become very popular in the last few years - for good reason. They feed hummingbirds and butterflies. And this superior variety from Oregon's TerraNova Nurseries is compact, free blooming and amazingly hardy. And redhot, by the way.

    11.50
     


  • Leonotis leonurus

    (Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) "Leon" is Greek for "lion," whereas "otis" translates as "ear." The appellation "leonurus" equals "lion colored." Actually, we think the tawny orange blossoms of this mint family (Lamiaceae) species look more like a lion's mane.

    10.50
     


  • Leonotis menthifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Wild Dagga) Mint Lion's Ear is a drought-tolerant perennial in areas with mild climates and works well as an annual in regions with cold winter temperatures. It is a fine Salvia companion, particularly as a middle-of-border planting that looks magnificent when massed.

    10.50
     


    Special Order Plant
    Special Order Plant   This plant is available by Special Order. Click for more information.
  • Leonotis nepetifolia

    (Mint Lion's Ear or Klipp Dagga) Here's another plant for Dr. Seuss gardens. Mint Lion's Ear produces intermittent, shaggy whorls of fuzzy, rosy orange tubular flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love. The blossoms burst from prickly, round clusters on stems as tall and slender as auto antennas.

    10.50
     


  • Lepechinia bella

    (Blue Pitchersage) True blue trumpet flowers arch up from Blue Pitchersage's purple-to-green calyxes. The pebbly, heavily veined leaves are mid-green on top and nearly white on their undersides.

    15.00
     


    Special Order Plant
    Special Order Plant   This plant is available by Special Order. Click for more information.
  • Lepechinia fragrans

    (Island Pitcher Sage) Native to shady canyons on the coast of Southern California's Channel Islands, this threatened species is highly desirable for its ruggedness, its aromatic furry leaves and its spectacular pink flowers.

    11.50
     


  • Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Gold Angel'

    (Gold Angel Japanese Shrub Mint) Partial shade settings or locations with morning sun and afternoon shade are best for this fragrant mint bush that glows in dappled sunlight. It is a Japanese woodland native well suited to areas with chilly winters.

    11.50
     


  • Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Silver Angel'

    (Silver Angel Japanese Shrub Mint) Partial shade settings or locations with morning sun and afternoon shade are best for Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Silver Angel'. This is a fragrant, variegated mint bush that glows in dappled sunlight. It is an exceptionally cold-tolerant Japanese woodland native.

    12.00
     


  • Lobelia 'Monet Moment'

    (Monet Moment Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Lobelia 'Monet Moment' are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    11.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia 'Starship Deep Rose'

    (Starship Deep Rose Cardinal Flower) What a great, long-blooming perennial! The bright pink flowers of Starship Deep Rose are plentiful and attract lots of buzz from butterflies and hummingbirds.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Lobelia cardinalis 'Queen Victoria'

    (Queen Victoria Cardinal Flower) Calling all butterfly and hummingbird lovers in areas with chilly winters: This one's for you. Lobelias are well known for attracting pollinators. This one is extremely cold tolerant and even does well in the Rocky Mountain West.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia

    (Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the long, scarlet and orange trumpet blossoms of this Lobelia native to the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico.

    10.50
     


  • Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

    (Giant Red Cardinal Flower) Similar to the plumage of a Northern Cardinal, the flowers of this Lobelia hybrid are startlingly red. The tubular blossoms have lips that flare at their openings into petals shaped like poinsettia bracts.

    10.50
     


  • Marrubium supinum

    (Scallop Shell Horehound) The mint family (Lamiaceae) is well known for fragrant, medicinal plants, including Marrubium supinum, which means "bitter" and "prostrate."

    10.50
     


  • Origanum x 'Norton Gold'

    (Norton's Gold Oregano) Although used in cooking, this mild tasting oregano is particularly ornamental. Its gold-green leaves turn bright gold in autumn adding a glow to herb gardens, borders and container plantings. In summer, it shoots up 20-inch-tall spikes of pink flowers.

    10.50
     


  • Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer'

    (Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia) Slender, hot pink trumpet blossoms of Lemon Spritzer Cape Fuchsia dangle from red flower spikes. They hang over variegated foliage that looks like someone sprayed it with lime, forest green and cream accents.

    10.50
     


  • Seemannia sylvatica 'Bolivian Sunset'

    (Bolivian Sunset Hardy Gloxinia) These flowers have a glow that lights up a shady spot. Furry and rich in color - and two inches long - they are numerous to the point of almost hiding the attractive dark green leaves during their peak. This spectacular Gesneriad comes form high elevations in the Bolivian Andes, and is Zone 8 hardy with proper mulching.

    10.50
     


  • Sinningia 'Scarlet O'Hara'

    (Scarlet O'Hara Hardy Gloxinia) This plant's  long, tubular, deep pink flowers dangle from apple green, leaf-like calyxes. Fuzzy red petioles connect the flowers to deep red stems rising above slightly furry, soft green leaves. This older hybrid of South American gloxinias can handle a bit of winter chill.

    10.50
     


  • Sinningia 'Shelby'

    (Shelby Hardy Gloxinia) Shelby's long, tubular, creamy pink flowers dangle from apple green, leaf-like calyxes. Fuzzy red petioles connect the flowers to deep red stems rising above slightly furry, soft green leaves. This Suncrest Nurseries hybrid of South American gloxinias can handle a bit of winter chill.

    10.50
     


  • Sinningia sellovii 'Pink & Yellow'

    (Hardy Pink & Yellow Gloxinia) This color form is rarely seen in Sinningia sellovii, which is a Brazilian species that tolerates heat and lures hummingbirds.

    10.50
     


  • Stachys albotomentosa

    (Hidalgo or 7-UP Plant) I love to ask people what the smell of these leaves remind them of. Almost no one gets it on the first try, but when I say, "7 UP", their eyes light up, heads nod and the resounding answer is, "Yes!"

    10.50
     


  • Stachys coccinea

    (Red Betony) Heralding from the arid Southwest, this attractive and desirable perennial is one of the best hummingbird plants. Small pastel red/orange flowers make a real impact due to their numbers - this plant is often covered in flowers. And the furry leaves have a mild, fruity fragrance, especially in warm weather.

    10.50
     




Take a Quick Look at a group of Salvias
Have questions?
Contact us
Contact us

Current Bestsellers

Reviews


Having recently received Cayman, I haven't yet seen it in bloom but am delighted to give a home to a plant that was on the brink of extinction. Since it may be short-lived, I'll keep it in a pot and try leaf cuttings in the winter. I like this com...
Ms. Robin Hoselton
Jun 3, 2017