707 877-1717        Contact Us        Sign in        Everything Salvias Blog
Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Salvia ionocalyx


  • Details

  • Cultural Icons

  • Compatible Plants

  • Customer Reviews

  • Send to Friend

  • Additional Information

  • Attracting Hummingbirds

  • Attracting Butterflies

  • Deer Tips

Salvia ionocalyx

  • Great foliege

Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Limited Availability Plant
Limited Availability

Available March to June only.

Learn more

Description

(Violet Calyx Sage) Here's another abundantly blooming sage from the cloud forest slopes of Chiapas, Mexico. Violet beelines mark the lower lip of the crimson blossoms, which are so numerous that it can be difficult to see the foliage at times.

Bloom time is autumn into winter in Zones 9 to 11. The 2-inch-long, netted leaves have purple undersides, making this plant attractive even when not in bloom. Well branched and compact, it has an attractive fountain shape that makes it work well as an accent plant. Violet Calyx Sage also looks good in a large patio container. Give this water-loving species rich, well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade.

One last bit of buzz: Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds -- especially ones hanging out for the winter in warm climates -- love this plant. Fortunately, deer don't.

Details

Product rating
 
(1 reviews)  

In stock
Limited Availability

Common name
Violet Caylx Sage
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
48"/60"/60"
Exposure
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type
Well drained & rich
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$8.50

Options


Email me when back in stock  
Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11
48 inches tall
48 inches tall
60 inches wide
60 inches wide
Shrub
Shrub

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Winter blooming
Winter blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Butterflies
Butterflies
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Incarvillea arguta

    (Himalayan Gloxinia) Delicate, pink, trumpet blossoms with flared corollas top mid-green foliage on reddish-green stems. This tough, long-blooming plant is native to the Himalayas. Plant hunter Chris Chadwell collected our seeds in Nepal.

    Arguta refers to the sharply notched edges of this gloxinia's glossy leaves. The genus name Incarvillea honors the Jesuit missionary, Pierre Nicolas Le Chéron d'Incarville (1706-1757), whose plant exploration in China initiated the worldwide popularity of many Chinese plants, including gloxinias.

    The Beijing Center for Chinese Studies notes that d'Incarville was part of a group of advisors invited to China by Emperor Qianlong in 1739 to help cultivate European plants in his "Garden of Perfect Brightness." D'Incarville wasn't a formally trained botanist, but studied at the Paris Jardin du Roi for six months before leaving France for China, the country where he would eventually die.

    Although Himalayan Gloxinia can tolerate weak fertility, it grows best in rich garden soil with full sun to partial shade. A location with morning sun and afternoon shade is best in areas with hot summers. Incarvillea arguta thrives with average watering based on local rainfall and loves supplemental watering as long as its soil doesn't become soggy.

    Sometimes called Chinese Trumpet Flower, Himalayan Gloxinia is a reliable understory plant that also thrives in containers.

    $8.50
  • Salvia biserrata

    Vivid deep violet flowers bloom from summer into fall and contrast prettily with the bright green, rumply foliage of this tall sage from southeastern Mexico. Belgian botanist and orchid lover Jean Jules Linden was the first to record its discovery in 1838, according to records on file at Britain’s Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Linden shares credit for this sage with two peers who also were researching the botanical treasures of Mexico -- botanists Henri Guillaume Galeotti of France and Martin Martens of Belgium. The website MexConnect notes that Linden and Galeotti were part of a scientific entourage that climbed Mexico’s highest peak -- the volcano El Pico de Orizaba, which rises 18,853 feet above sea level – near Veracruz in 1838. Perhaps that is where they encountered this heat-tolerant, yet water-loving sage.

    By six years later, the plant was published as Salvia biserrataM. Martens & Galeotti. Who knows why Martens’ name is attached to the species and not Linden’s? It is a tantalizing mystery about a tough, attractive plant for which little information is available.

    However, we do know that this herbaceous perennial grows rapidly up to 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide. It does well in either sun or partial shade and loves water and rich, well-drained soil. We also know that hummingbirds love it, but deer do not. We think you would enjoy it in borders, background plantings, moist areas of the yard, patio containers and seasonal flowerbeds.

    Note: The name of this plant could be suspect, as not all botanists agree. Whatever the name, this is a great summer Salvia.
    $8.50
  • Salvia concolor

    (Blue Black Mexican Sage) This spectacular and hardy native of Central Mexico is exciting to watch as new growth shoots upward rapidly from its root stock in spring. Its large, vibrant, purple-blue flowers bloom for about 10 months and are profuse from late autumn through winter on flower spikes up to 20 inches long.

    Calyxes similar in color to the flowers they cup give this sage its scientific name, which means “of the same color.” Easy to grow in a partial shade location, this woodland plant is sometimes mistaken for Salvia guaranitica. However, it is a different species.

    Blue Black Mexican Sage works well up against a fence or building that offers morning sun and afternoon shade as well as protection from wind. Plant it as a shrubby border, screen or container plant. It's ideal for moist areas.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia dombeyi

    (Giant Bolivian Sage) Hailing from Peru and Bolivia, this tender specimen is found at altitudes of 9,000 feet in the wild. This multi-stemmed, woody-based, climbing Salvia needs support. Hummingbirds love its 5-inch-long, crimson flowers, which are the longest grown by any Salvia and flower from late summer through autumn.

    In frost-free zones and with support, such as a trellis or not-too-hot wall, Giant Bolivian Sage can reach nearly 20 feet in height. In most gardens, it will grow 6 to 8 feet in a season. It prefers filtered sun or a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade. Fast-draining, loamy soil is another requirement.

    This rare selection always sells out quickly and wins our commendation as our best climbing, flowering sage.

    Red was a sacred color in Ancient Incan culture. The red blossoms of various flowers were prized, including Giant Bolivian Sage, Salvia oppositiflora and Salvia tubiflora. They were used as part of religious ceremonies intended to appease various gods, including mountain dieties who the Incans believed were the cause of volcanic eruptions.

    This is the confirmed species.  We guarantee its identity.
    $9.00
  • Salvia dorisiana

    (Fruit Scented Sage)  This native of Honduras has it all -- big, light-green leaves that are fuzzy soft and large magenta-pink flowers that smell intoxicating and bloom from winter into spring. Fruit Scented Sage is one of the strongest and most deliciously scented plants we have encountered. As with so many Salvias, it has a fascinating history.

    This tender perennial is not named after the daughter of a mythological Greek titan. Instead, it is named for Doris Zemurray Stone (1909-1994), an American archeologist and ethnographer who focused on Central America. She was the daughter of a different kind of titan, Russian immigrant Samuel Zemurray, who founded the United Fruit Company as well as a school for agricultural research in Honduras called Escuela Agricola Panamericana. Botanist Paul C. Standley, who named Salvia dorisiana, worked at the school. He introduced the plant to cultivation in the late 1940s.

    At our oceanside nursery, Salvia dorisiana over-winters with minimal cold damage and springs back with new growth from its lower stem in the years when we get a prolonged frost. It prefers full sun and rich, well-drained soil.

    Hummingbirds are drawn to Fruit Scented Sage, but deer don't favor it. Great in containers, this is a good container plant for patios if you live in an area colder than Zones 9 to 11.
    $8.50
  • Salvia gravida

    ((Gravid Sage) This tender perennial from Michoacán, Mexico, has large, rich magenta flowers that hang from the arching branches in clusters up to 12 inches long. Growing up to 5 feet tall, this sage offers an unforgettable display when in bloom.

    "Gravid" means "with child," and a plant loaded with it's full inflorescence does bring a pregnant woman to mind. Grow this dazzling sage against a wall or trellis. Give it full sun or partial shade as well as rich, well-drained soil and ample water.


    Consider Gravid Sage for border, background and container plantings.

    $8.50
  • Salvia iodantha 'Louis Saso'

    (Big Leaf Scandent Mexican Sage) Bigger leaves, larger, looser flowers and pink petioles -- the tiny stemlets connecting leaves to stems -- differentiate this clone, which may possibly be a hybrid, from the species Salvia iodantha. Also a winter-blooming perennial, it's covered with velvety, 8-inch-long, magenta blossoms from fall into winter.

    The peak bloom period for Louis Saso is during mild, sunny weather in either December or January. Although it can survive a temperature of 20 degrees F, blooming is inhibited when temperatures fall below 25 degrees F for days at a time. At our coastal, Northern California farm, it blooms through the worst winter storms.

    Give it at least 6 hours of sun daily, deep watering weekly, shelter from strong winds and well-drained, loamy soil. Growing up to 6 feet tall and wide, Louis Saso is a good screen or back of border plant. However, it needs support or pruning in late summer to keep it tidy.

    Whirring Wings Warning: Similar to Salvia iodantha, this is a hummingbird magnet!
    $9.00
  • Salvia littae

    (Litta's Purple Sage) From the cloud forests of Oaxaca, Mexico, comes this lovely shade-loving sage. Large, fuzzy, purplish-pink flowers clusters bloom from late fall into early spring. We have received reports that this sub-shrub is hardy in Zone 8 if mulched.

    Litta's Purple Sage spreads by underground runners and forms a pretty clump of soft green leaves. It is undemanding, but needs needs full sun and rich, well-drained soil.

    Sub-shrubs have some woody growth as well as softer, herbaceous perennial foliage. In Zone 8, this well-branched sage may completely die back to the ground like an herbaceous perennial. Mulching keeps the roots from dying in cold weather. When the weather warms up, you remove the mulch.

    We grow Litta's Purple Sage in containers that overwinter in our greenhouses where its flowers brighten the duller colors of winter. Outdoors during the rest of the year, it looks pretty in borders and -- because it can get large -- as a background planting in a woodland garden. Hummingbirds enjoy it.

    Highly recommended.


    $8.50
  • Salvia purpurea

    (Autumn Purple Sage) Small but numerous, the flowers of this sage are a variable shade of light purple that is unlike any other we grow. Native to Southern Mexico and Guatemala, this shrub regularly grows up to 5 feet tall (or taller) and 4 feet wide.

    The light yellow-green leaves of Salvia purpurea brighten a shaded garden. Similar to Scandent Mexican Sage (Salvia iodantha), the flowers of Autumn Purple Sage have a translucent quality. The two species form a pretty, blended clump when grown together. However, Autumn Purple tolerates shade better than Scandent Mexican Sage .

    This fragrant, heat-tolerant shrub grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11. It blooms from summer into fall, attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.

    Give this sage rich, well drained soil. It thrives with average watering based on local conditions, but is a water lover. Try it in damp parts of the yard or moist woodland gardens. It works well as a screen, background planting or part of a shrub border and looks lovely in flower arrangements.

    This rare, colorful Salvia should be in wider use.
    $8.50
  • Salvia univerticillata

    (Blood Red Mexican Sage) From summer into fall, the fuzzy, deep red flowers of Salvia univerticillata attract hummingbirds. This sage from Chiapas, Mexico, blooms well in partial shade or full sun.

    The flower spikes are unusual, because the blossoms are arranged in single whorls. The heavily veined and textured leaves are almost round and have a pungent odor when brushed.

    This 5-foot-tall sub-shrub has soft, herbaceous perennial growth as well as woody stems. It is a heat-tolerant, cloud-forest native that appreciates rich soil and ample water for maximum growth. Plant it in a large container from which it will spill over the edges and form a lovely mound. Or grow it to full size in a shrubby border, especially in a damp woodland garden.

    This species once was confused with Salvia pulchella. However, this is the true Salvia univerticillata as displayed in the San Francisco Botanical Gardens. It grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11.
    $8.50
Average customer rating:
 
(1 reviews)  



1 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Mrs. Helena Hartje
May 23, 2014
Lucky to find rare salvias at FBTS. Love the color of the blooms and can't wait for it to bloom for me.
Loading...Was the above review useful to you? Yes (0) / No (0)

: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture:
Verify Humanity

*
Ask Mr. Sage: What Hummingbird and Butterfly Salvias Tolerate Lots of Moisture

Ask Mr. Sage: What Hummingbird and Butterfly Salvias Tolerate Lots of Moisture


Category: Ask Mr. Sage
Posted: Jun 2, 2014 01:00 AM
Synopsis: Ask Mr. Sage answers questions based on calls and emails that Flowers by the Sea receives. This one explains how to cruise the Flowers by the Sea online catalog to find butterfly and hummingbird Salvias that can handle lots of moisture.
Quick Digs: Planning a Salvia Garden Calendar

Quick Digs: Planning a Salvia Garden Calendar


Category: Quick Digs
Posted: Jan 30, 2014 06:34 PM
Synopsis:

This is our second article in a Quick Digs series about preparing for spring in Salvia (sage) gardens. It's easier to succeed at almost anything if you make plans and set goals before beginning a project. This is certainly true in Salvia gardening. Creating a gardening calendar ensures greater success in planning.

Blazing Red Sages for Sun and Partial Shade

Blazing Red Sages for Sun and Partial Shade


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Jun 16, 2013 12:44 PM
Synopsis: Warm colors tend to take center stage in a landscape as well as brightening the shade. Yet warm colors generally aren't associated with shady sage (Salvia) gardens, because there are far more shade-tolerant sages in the blue to purple range. So we decided to poke around our catalog and pull together some hot choices that thrive in partial shade.
To make landscaping even easier, you may want to limit your choice of plants to one color. Massing is dramatic.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.

Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.