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Salvia rubiginosa


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  • Attracting Hummingbirds

  • Deer Tips

Salvia rubiginosa

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Spring Limited Availability Plant
Spring Limited Availability

This plant is available only in the spring

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Description

(Rosy Bract Sage) Sub-shrub salvias have both woody and soft, herbaceous growth. Rosy Bract Sage is a tidy, small leafed sub-shrub that grows about 2 feet tall and wide. It is smothered with large clusters of 1/2-inch, violet-blue flowers and rosy red bracts that deepen to rusty burgundy as the season proceeds.

This water-loving, mounding sage is hardy to USDA Zones 8 to 11. Give it partial shade, rich soil and ample water, and it will give you a stunning, long-blooming floral display beginning in spring. You can use Salvia rubiginosa as a groundcover, path edging or part of perennial borders and pathway edging. It is a good choice for damp woodland gardens.

This native of southern coastal Mexico and Guatamala is also one of our favorite container plants.  It seems to bloom the entire growing season.

 

Details

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In stock
Spring Limited Availability

Common name  
Rosy Bract Sage
USDA Zones  
8 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)  
24"/24"/24"
Exposure  
Partial shade
Soil type  
Well drained & rich
Water needs  
Water loving
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
11.50

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Fragrant
Fragrant

Growing Habit

8 - 11
8 - 11
24 inches tall
24 inches tall
24 inches wide
24 inches wide
Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds

Colors

Salvias and their companion plants pop with color. Sweep your eyes from top to the bottom here for an impression of this plant's color combinations. The first row displays blossoms from primary to less dominant shades and includes any contrasting throat color. The second tier is the main hue of leaf-like bracts or calyxes supporting the flowers. Foliage (one or two colors) leafs out in the bottom row.
Primary color - Vivid Violet
RHS# 89B



Secondary color - Vivid Blue
RHS# 95B






Throat color - Yellowish white - RHS# 155D




Tertiary color - Yellowish white
RHS# 155D



Bract color - Dark Red
RHS# 187A

Leaf color - Strong Yellowish Green
RHS# 143B



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Ready for some pruning?

Deciduous or semi-evergreen, soft stem Salvias

These are species whose stems never develop a woody character and that either die to the ground or loose leaves and become unsightly at the end of a growing season. This group includes both hardy and tender types. Many of the tender forms are grown as annuals in cold winter areas.

Pruning is both an art and a science. It takes practice, experience and learning from your mistakes to become a proficient pruner. The pruning information about this plant should be considered as a guideline for getting started. Your particular climate, soils, watering and fertility schedules, sun exposure, space requirements and weather are all factors that influence how and when you choose to prune. We’re providing a starting place for you, and over time you will learn the particularities of this plant in your garden. Don’t be afraid to get started – Salvias, in general, are quick to rebound if inappropriately pruned.

Deadheading – the removal of spent flowers, is a practice that will always benefit the plant’s health and appearance. This can be done at any time. Pruning involves removal of entire stems of spent growth. Becoming "spent" means that flowering stems stop blooming and begin going to seed.

Growing Season Pruning

During the spring and summer, you can completely cut to the ground any stems that have finished blooming and are becoming unsightly.

In mild climate areas, growth can be so rapid that the entire plant becomes messy and spent mid-way through the season. In this case, it can be cut back close to the ground – given a short “haircut”. The result usually is fresh, vigorous new growth and another round of flowering.




Dormant Season Pruning

At the end of the growing season or after the first frost the spent stems can be completely removed, cut to the ground. Often these are a tangled mess, and one can get great satisfaction by cutting them all off. This also facilitates good garden sanitation, and will help to control pests over the winter.


Check the Views from the Garden section of our Everything Salvias Blog for videos that apply to this plant.

  • Centradenia floribunda

    (Spanish Shawl) This is one of these plants that stops most people in their tracks. The deep purple/pink, standout flowers are show stoppers in and of themselves - but the furry leaves, which start green and mature to a bronze red are unique and unforgettable.

    Use this native of Colombia in a large container, a hanging basket or as a ground cover in mild climates.  It blooms almost nonstop during the growing season.  Well worth growing as an annual in colder Zones - there is nothing like this plant!

    Here is a link to an article about this plant from the San Francisco Chronicle.

    10.50
  • Salvia adenophora

    (Oaxaca Red Sage) This rare sage has small, furry, bright orange-red flowers in abundance. It grows nicely in containers or, in mild climates, can become a large shrub in the ground. Attractive, bright green foliage and winter-to-summer blooming make it a desirable choice.

    It may not be scientific, but the best way to describe this plant is "cute."  Buds that look like little balloons ready to burst are followed by furry, tubular flowers. This water-loving Salvia does best in partial shade. Even though Oaxaca Red is a tender perennial, it's well worth the effort to grow this gem.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia glechomifolia

    (Ground Ivy Sage) Native to Central Mexico's highlands, this creeping perennial grows at a altitudes of more than 10,000 feet and can handle some chill. Its common name comes from its scalloped yellow-green leaves, which resemble Ground Ivy or Glechoma.

    The wiry stems of this heat-tolerant Salvia sprawl and spread gracefully. Honeybees are attracted by the prominent double beelines on the violet-blue blossoms of its 1-foot-tall flower spikes, which bloom from summer into fall.

    This is an ideal low-growing groundcover that is adaptable to full sun or partial shade. Grow it in full sun in cooler zones and in partial shade elsewhere. We also highly recommend this plant as a groundcover or in mixed containers where it carpets the base of larger plants, conserves soil moisture and spills gently over the pot's edge. Don't be afraid to water and fertilize it regularly. 

    10.50
  • Salvia x 'Raspberry Truffle'

    (Raspberry Truffle Sage) Hybrid sages with Big Mexican Scarlet Sage parentage (Salvia gesnerifolia) tend to have thick clusters of large, deep purple flowers supported by bracts that are almost black.

    Raspberry Truffle Sage is also related to another tallish Salvia, Mexican Sage (S. mexicana). Whereas Mexican Sage is a perennial with soft herbaceous growth, Big Mexican Scarlet Sage is shrubby.

    Bloomtime can vary depending on location. On our Northern California farm, Raspberry Truffle starts flowering in late fall, and continues through March. Our resident hummingbirds greatly appreciate its nectar during a season when flowers can be scarce. At other seasons, this sage is worth growing just for its foliage. Its leaves are thick, hairy and deeply veined -- deep green on top and velvety purple underneath.

    Raspberry Truffle grows as a shrub in mild climates and as an herbaceous perennial at the cold end of its range. It needs full sun, well-drained soil and moderate winter temperatures.

    Highly recommended and always in short supply!
    10.50
  • Salvia amarissima

    (Bitter Mexican Sage) Hummingbirds love this heat-tolerant Salvia, which is one of our best choices for shady, moist areas. The large-lipped, baby-blue flowers with white striations bloom from late summer through fall.

    This compact shrub grows well in the garden or in a container, especially where it will receive morning sun and afternoon shade or partial shade all day. In its native Mexico, it is used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments. We love its grace and beauty in the garden!

    Highly recommended.

    10.50
  • Salvia clinopodioides 'Michoacan Blue'

    (Michoacan Blue Sage) This unusual and distinctive Mexican sage grows from tuberous roots. It is compact and decidedly vertical with strong, square, winged stems that rocket upward and are topped with clusters of rich blue flowers in large rosy bracts come autumn.

    In Zone 7 and above, you can leave the tubers in the ground or dig them up and divide them as you would dahlias to extend their growing range in your yard. Due to this plant's drought tolerance, we have been able to grow it without watering in summer. It needs full sun to partial shade and does well in containers, border plantings, cut-flower gardens and woodland-style gardens.

    The identification and nomenclature of this plant have been confusing at best. However, one thing is certain: If you grow it, you'll love it!

    10.50
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Getting Started: How Much Water Salvias Need

Getting Started: How Much Water Salvias Need


Category: Getting Started with Salvias
Posted: Feb 20, 2015 08:33 AM
Synopsis:

Salvias may need little or lots of water depending on species and local growing conditions. Many are drought resistant, getting by on less than an inch a week. Learn about the many kinds of Salvias, also called sages, at Flowers by the Sea. We're an online, mail-order nursery specializing in sages.

Spring Inventory

Spring Inventory


Category: News
Posted: Mar 19, 2012 08:42 PM
Synopsis: Good news for all "font-style: italic;">Salvia lovers (and everyone else who loves unusual plants). We are now starting to list our Spring inventory, which means larger quantities and wider availability.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.