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Salvia x jamensis 'California Sunset'


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Salvia x jamensis 'California Sunset'

  • A great color and a fine garden plant

Time to think about Fall Planting
This plant is
Ideal for Fall Planting
Best of Class
Best of Class
We believe this to be the best pastel sunset shades Autumn Sage.

Description

(California Sunset Hybrid Jame Sage) Entranced is the only word to describe how we felt when we first saw the peachy sunset pastels of this Jame Sage. After growing it for multiple seasons, we are just as impressed by its compact, well-branched form.

Jame Sages (S. x jamensis spp.) are hybrid members of the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) group, but are often pastel. Native to Mexico and the American Southwest, they occur in areas where Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains.

Hardy to at least 10 degrees F, California Sunset is also heat tolerant, drought resistant and long blooming. It would look lovely in a mixed planter or perennial border with other sages featuring red, pink and yellow blossoms. Or mass it for a spectacular groundcover. This tough plant loves full sun, but tolerates a bit of shade.

Highly recommended by butterflies, hummingbirds and gardeners!

Details

Product rating
 
(1 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name
California Sunset Hybrid Jame Sage
USDA Zones
7 - 9
Size (h/w/fh)
36"/36"/36"
Exposure
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type
Well drained
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$8.50

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

7 - 9
7 - 9
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
36 inches wide
36 inches wide
Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Butterflies
Butterflies
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Lobelia laxiflora var angustifolia

    (Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the long, scarlet and orange trumpet blossoms of this Lobelia native to the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico.

    Mexican Cardinalflower is another common name for Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower. In its scientific name, the term laxiflora refers to the looseness of this long-blooming, clump-spreading plant's flower stems. Angustifolia concerns the narrowness of its shiny leaves.

    The Lobelia genus is named for French botanist and herbalist Matthias de l'Obel (1538-1616) who served as physician and botanist to Britain's King James I.

    Sierra Madre Cardinal Flower triples in height when in bloom. It grows well in full sun to partial shade and tolerates heat. Although it thrives with average watering based on local conditions, this beauty also tolerates drought. It is perennial in a broad range of zones and, due to rapid growth, is a good bedding plant in areas with frigid winters. Plant it in rich soil.

    $8.50
  • Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

    (Giant Red Cardinal Flower) Similar to the plumage of a Northern Cardinal, the long-blooming flowers of this Lobelia hybrid are startlingly red. The tubular blossoms have lips that flare at their openings into petals shaped like poinsettia bracts.

    When in bloom, Giant Red Cardinal Flower doubles in height. It's spectacular cardinal red flower spikes make dramatic additions to cut flower arrangements.

    The clumping foliage, which forms a mound, has lance-shaped, mid-green leaves with serrated edges. Remember that young children and pets should not chew on the leaves due to their alkaloids.

    Although the origin of Lobelia hybrids can be difficult to nail down, a number of sources identify Giant Red as a cross between L. cardinalis, L. siphilitica and L. fulgens. The first two plants are native to the U.S. while L. fulgens comes from Mexico.

    Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds all are drawn to Giant Red. The great news for gardeners who enjoy developing small wildlife habitat is that this plant is easy to cultivate and grows rapidly. Although it does fine with average watering based on local conditions, it loves wet feet. So it does well in and near ponds and boggy areas in full sun.

    Plant Giant Red in containers, borders, native plant gardens and seasonal flower beds. It's especially ideal for woodland gardens.

    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Origanum x 'Norton Gold'

    Although used in cooking, this mild tasting oregano is particularly ornamental. Its gold-green leaves turn bright gold in autumn adding a glow to herb gardens, borders and container plantings. In summer, it shoots up 20-inch-tall spikes of pink flowers.

    Norton’s Gold is a hybrid, but the species is native to Greece and Turkey. This short variety rises up 3 to 6 inches and spreads 24 inches or more. So it works well as a fragrant, drought-resistant groundcover. It's also cold tolerant and grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9.

    Give this perennial partial to full shade or a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade. Any soil will do as long as it is well drained. Regular watering is fine, but as with so many herbs, Norton’s Gold Oregano thrives in dry conditions.

    Historically, oreganos have been used as in herbal remedies for problems including respiratory difficulties, heartburn and urinary tract afflictions. Oregano oil also is used in insect repellant; in the garden, oregano plants deter many garden pests while attracting honeybees and butterflies. You might say they are golden.

    $7.00
  • Salvia greggii 'Cherry Chief'

    (Cherry Chief Autumn Sage) With hundreds of varieties of Autumn Sage on the market, there is much confusion as to which ones to plant.  This red-flowered cultivar, developed by Richard Dufresne of North Carolina, is a top choice.

    Cherry Chief has flowers of an almost translucent red, a color that is difficult to capture in photographs but eye catching in the garden.  It is one of the larger Salvia greggii types we grow, but can easily be kept smaller by pruning. Undemanding, it grows well in full sun or partial shade and with little water.

    Autumn Sage was discovered in Northern Mexico by pioneer and plant explorer Josiah Gregg during the 19th century Mexican American War. Now it is one of the most popular Salvias grown in the world due to its many colors, tidy foliage, adaptability to heat and cold, drought resistance and long bloom times.

    Hummingbirds and humans alike enjoy Cherry Chief's flowers from spring into fall. We highly recommend it.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia greggii 'Furman's Red'

    (Furman's Red Autumn Sage) Selected by noted Texas plantsman W.A. Furman in the 1970s, this hardy Texas native is beautiful and tough withstanding heat, drought and freezing winters. Its flowers, which bloom spring through fall, are a rich, saturated red bordering on magenta.

    Averaging growth up to 3 feet tall, but never wider than 2 feet, it adds zing to borders in spaces between lower growing plants such as Salvia x jamensis. It harmonizes well with pastel types of S. x jamensis.

    Heat tolerant and drought resistant, Furman's Red is a good background planting or tall groundcover in a dry garden. It readily attracts honeybees and butterflies, but not deer. This is one of the best choices for extreme conditions, seeming to thrive on hot, dry days and cold nights. Plant it in full sun or partial shade in any well-drained soil.
    $8.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Lowrey's Peach'

    (Lowrey's Peach Autumn Sage) No other Salvia has a color like this: a warm, rosy orange with a pastel peach skirt and bright yellow throat. Wow! This is our best pastel orange Autumn Sage not only due to its blossoms but also it's compact branching habit and glossy foliage.

    Hardy to at least 10 degrees F, Lowrey's Peach is also heat tolerant and can be expected to bloom from spring into fall. It would look lovely in a mixed planter or perennial border with Autumn Sages featuring red, pink and yellow blossoms. Or mass it for a spectacular groundcover. It loves full sun, but tolerates a bit of shade.

    $8.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Orange Yucca Do'

    (Big Orange Autumn Sage) Standout color is the big draw for this large growing Autumn Sage. Collected in the mountains of Northern Mexico, it grows well in a wide range of climates, including the hot dry Southwest and the cool moist Pacific Northwest. A difficult color to capture in a photo, it is well described as a warm orange with a scarlet overlay.

    The unusual color and large size of this cultivar make it a great accent plant, surrounded by deep blues or whites. Most people who see this one in person find it both attractive and unusual. And it is unusually long blooming as well!

    Highly recommended.

    $8.50
  • Salvia greggii 'Texas Wedding'

    (Texas Wedding White Autumn Sage) This is our best white-flowered Autumn Sage. It is compact, hardy and blooms abundantly. We love it as a contrast to the generally bright colors of its group. Texas Wedding seems to always be blooming, with massive displays in spring and fall.

    The flowers are small but so profuse that they seem to outnumber the leaves.

    This variety of Salvia greggii makes a great, small-scale groundcover when each plant is spaced two feet apart. Although it tolerates some shade -- especially in hot climates -- it needs full sun. Good drainage is another necessity, but it doesn't require much watering.

    Texas Wedding is reliably hardy to 10 degrees F, but can tolerate colder temperatures with mulching. Here's some other good news: Deer don't much care for it.

    $8.50
  • Salvia lineata

    (Oaxaca Orange Wooly Sage) Tall, eye-catching spikes of dusky red-orange flowers that bloom from summer into fall make this one of our most impressive Salvias. Plus it's cold hardy into Zone 7.

    Even in a fully blooming border, this native of Southern Mexico's cloud forests is the plant that draws the eye.The flowers harmonize with deep blues, such as the gentian of Salvia patens 'Patio Blue,' and bright yellows, including Salvia nubicola.

    It is Oaxaca Orange's hairy foliage that gains it the description of being 'wooly' and helps it survive drought and heat. This sage works well in herbaceous perennial borders and container plantings or as a small-scale groundcover in the broad range of climates from Zones 7 to 11. We highly recommend it.

    Limited availability.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia microphylla 'Flower Child'

    (Flower Child Mountain Sage) At 18 to 24 inches tall, this is the smallest Salvia microphylla that we grow. Its common name is based on the plant's lavender-to-pink flowers, which are so abundant that they sometimes seem to outnumber the leaves.

    Mountain Sages are native to the American Southwest and Mexico and usually grow much larger than Flower Child. Many reach up to 4 feet tall.

    This cultivar is part of the Turbulent Sixties Series from California's Monterey Bay Nursery where it was found as a single-branch sport on the famous 'Bezerkeley' clone. The brightness of the flowers is offset by dark bluish-black bracts. Bloom time is from spring to fall in USDA Zones 7 to 9, with production infrequent in summer.

    Although it is drought resistant and does well in dry gardens, Flower Child prefers regular watering. It adapts to most soils as long as drainage is good. Grow it in full sun to partial shade as a container plant or part of a perennial border. Due to its height and tendency to grow suckers at its base, Flower Child forms dense clumps and makes an exceptional groundcover with heavily veined, aromatic leaves.

    Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds all love the nectar of this long-blooming sage.
    $8.50
  • Salvia microphylla 'Heatwave Scorcher'

    (Scorching Pink Mountain Sage) Compact and small, this Mountain Sage is another fine groundcover for Southern California, the Southwest and Texas. Similar to Salvia microphylla 'Heatwave Glimmer', it not only survives but thrives in extreme heat.

    Hot pink flowers contrast prettily with the sage's well-branched, dense green foliage. The leaves are heavily veined and aromatic.

    At 2 feet tall and wide, this sage is also just the right for a container or edging a pathway. It looks lovely in a short shrub border and is ideal for dry native gardens. The Mountain Sage species is native to the semi-arid lands of the American Southwest and Mexico.

    Although heat tolerant and drought resistant, this sage appreciates regular watering and can handle partial shade. It is adaptable and grows well in many kinds of soil as long as it gets good drainage. Butterflies and hummingbirds are drawn to it at bloom time, which is spring to fall with lightest production in summer. Deer, however, leave it alone.

    For the record, Scorching Pink Mountain Sage also grows well in cooler regions and coastal climates.

    $8.50
  • Salvia microphylla 'Orange Door'

    (Big Orange Mountain Sage) When temperatures are cooler in spring and fall, the persimmon-orange flowers of this large Mountain Sage darken. Gray-green foliage, deep red calyxes and reddish-green stems add to the plant's fascinating look, which mixes well with yellows and blues.

    This Salvia microphylla comes from the mountains of Northern Mexico. We call it "Big Orange," because it matures to 4 feet tall and wide. Its flowers are also large and bloom spring to fall in USDA Zones 7 to 9.

    Similar to many Salvias, Big Orange is adaptable to differing conditions, including either full sun or partial shade. It grows well in a wide range of climates, including the hot, dry Southwest and the cool, moist Pacific Northwest. Although this heat- and drought-tolerant sage fits well in a dry, native garden, it also appreciates regular watering and an average garden soil, such as sandy loam.

    Plant it as a tall groundcover that can help control weeds. Or mass it for a shrubby border. It also looks pretty in a container where its height will be shorter.
    $8.50
  • Salvia microphylla 'Robin Middleton'

    (Robin Middleton Mountain Sage) Blush pink and white flowers combine with dark green foliage in this tough sage named for British Salvia Guru Robin Middleton of the ever helpful website Robin's Salvias.

    This is a medium-sized Salvia microphylla averaging 36 inches tall and wide. It does well in full sun but appreciates a bit of shade in hot areas. We find that exposure to some shade intensifies the delicate colors of its flowers, which bloom most heavily in spring and fall.

    This shrubby sage isn't picky about its soil, but needs good drainage. Although it does well in dry gardens, it also responds well to regular watering based on local conditions. We like to plant Robin Middleton Mountain Sage as a groundcover, in borders, along pathways and in containers.

    This sage is difficult to find, and supply is limited. If by chance you need large quantities for a groundcover planting, please contact us by clicking on the "larger-quantity" button beneath the "add to cart" button at the bottom of this page.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia microphylla 'Royal Bumble'

    (Royal Bumble Mountain Sage) Almost black, the stems and calyxes of this UK hybrid form a pleasing contrast with its scarlet flowers and aromatic, glossy green leaves. Bloom time is spring to fall. This Mountain Sage suckers freely and forms a dense clump.

    The flowers are velvety and long blooming. This fast-growing hybrid survives drought, but appreciates regular watering. It does particularly well in partial shade. Except for needing good drainage, it isn't fussy about soil type.


    Royal Bumble looks pretty in borders and does well in dry gardens. It is a colorful choice for native gardens. Grow it as a screen or background plant and in native plant gardens.

    We love and highly recommend this sage. So do butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival'

    (St. Charles Day Mountain Sage) Especially in spring and fall, masses of red-violet flowers bloom amid the silvery green foliage of Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival'. Put this one into the "must have" column.

    The densely branched foliage features oval leaves that are fragrant, textured and slightly ruffled. This Mountain Sage is an herbaceous perennial in cooler areas and a shrub in warmer zones.

    Native to the eastern Mexican state of Tamaulipas, it was collected near the village of San Carlos in 1992 by plant explorers from Yucca Do, a nursery in Southeastern Texas. Five years later, Yucca Do introduced the plant to commercial horticulture. It has been one of our favorites ever since.

    Mountain Sages are drought resistant, but respond well to regular watering. This mid-height variety grows up to 36 inches tall and wide in a location offering full sun to partial shade. It is adaptable to many soil types, but needs good drainage. Although well adapted to dry gardens, it appreciates regular watering.

    Even though this hummingbird favorite has been popular for years, it can be difficult to find in commercial production. We highly recommend it for borders, short screens and background planting.

    $8.50
  • Salvia microphylla 'Two Tone'

    (Two Tone Red Mountain Sage) The subtle two-tone combination of magenta and red flowers make you look twice at this long-blooming Mountain Sage. The blossoms, which fade to soft rose, are numerous from spring to fall. Large and dark green, the leaves have fuzzy undersides.

    Mountain Sages normally slow down bloom production in summer, but not this variety. It is also one of the best Salvia microphylla for less-than-perfect growing conditions; it thrives where smaller and more delicate varieties languish. It grows rapidly and is strong enough to be used as a large-scale groundcover for slopes and other problem areas.

    At 48 inches tall and wide, Two Tone Red Mountain Sage is ideal for use as a screen or background planting. It also looks pretty in borders. Depending on local growing conditions, it may be an herbaceous perennial in one area and a shrub in another.

    Give it full sun to partial shade and any kind of well-drained soil. Although it does well with regular watering, Two Tone Red is ideal for dry gardens. it is a hummingbird magnet!
    $8.50
  • Salvia texana

    (Texas Blue Sage) This is a cutie and a tough customer once established. It even grows well in caliche soils. Although Salvia texana typically blooms only during spring in Texas, it has a longer season stretching into fall up north.

    Flower colors are in the blue range and include purple and violet. Our strain could be described as having the violet of Scarlet O’Hara eyes as well as pronounced white beelines. Its deep green, oblong leaves and bracts are covered with silky hairs so long that they look like eyelashes.

    Although short at 12 to 24 inches tall, Texas Blue Sage is so charming that we like to crouch down to get a closer look. In Northern California, it thrives in full sun, but in Texas, it appreciates a bit of shade on the hottest days. This drought resistant Texas perennial does well in a dry garden, but also accepts regular watering in well drained soils.

    It can be temperamental outside its native range, so please take special care with this species.  Not a good plant for moist or humid parts of he country.

    Grow it as a groundcover or in borders, native plant gardens and prairie-type landscapes. We agree with the butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees that visit this beauty: What’s not to love about it.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x jamensis 'Pat Vlasto'

    (Pat Vlasto Hybrid Jame Sage) Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds all love this creamy red-orange Jame Sage with mid-green foliage. Thanks go to British botanist Dr. James Compton who found this excellent natural hybrid in Northern Mexico while on a plant expedition with the famous Yucca-Do Nursery of Texas in 1991.

    Pat Vlasto is larger than most varieties of Jame Sage (Salvia x jamensis), which is a hybrid member of the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) group.

    Native to the American Southwest as well as Mexico, Jame Sage occurs in areas where the closely related species of Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains.

    Jame Sage generally is more petite than S. x jamensis 'Pat Vlasto'. We give this plant a "best of class" designation for being our top large-size, pastel variety. This plant never seems to stop blooming for us and is easy to grow. It is heat and cold tolerant as well as drought resistant.

    Give Pat Vlasto Jame Sage plenty of sun. However, if you live in an area with extremely hot summers, choose a location offering some afternoon shade.
    $8.50
  • Salvia darcyi 'Pscarl'

    (Vermillion Bluffs® Mexican Sage) The brilliant red flowers of Vermillion Bluffs bloom abundantly from August to October. This variety of the Mexican native Salvia darcyi is cold hardy to Zone 5b at altitudes up to 5,500 feet.

    Salvia darcyi comes from Mexico's eastern Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range where it grows at altitudes up to 9,000 feet. Denver Botanic Gardens developed Vermillion Bluffs to withstand the colder winter weather of the Rocky Mountain region. It is a welcome substitute for Salvia microphylla or Salvia x jamensis , which struggle in cold weather.

    This sun-loving sage likes loamy soil. Plant it in shrubby borders, dry flower gardens and containers. Its underground runners form a tough mat that blocks weeds.

    The wrinkly, soft green foliage forms a graceful mound that glows against the bright flowers, which attract butterflies and hummingbirds. After frost, the foliage dies to the ground like an herbaceous perennial. Then it returns in spring.

    We can't help but highly recommend this easy-care plant. 

    Vermillion Bluffs is a registered trademark of Plant Select.

    $8.50
  • Salvia dichlamys

    (Scarlet Rooster Sage) From the Mountains of Mexico we have this stunning Sage, which seems never to be out of bloom. A superior hummingbird plant, the warm orange flowers that cover this shrubby perennial make it a standout in the garden.

    Easy to grow, you can use this one as a background to lighter flowered plants, as a Summer hedge, or as a stunning container plant.  We are amazed how popular these blooms are to our hummingbirds.

    Highly recommended.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia greggii 'Señorita Leah'

    (Delicate Lady Autumn Sage)The hot pink skirt and reddish throat of this sage's flowers draw the eye. Although Señorita Leah does well in full sun, the color of its flowers intensifies with a bit of shade. Compact and floriferous, it blooms from spring to fall.

    Perennial in Zones 7 to 9, it is an attractive annual in areas with cooler winters. This smallish shrub looks lovely as a groundcover or border plant and in patio containers.

    Overall, Salvia greggii species are colorful, long blooming, dependable, drought resistant and adaptable to a wide range of regions.

    $8.50
  • Salvia x 'John Whittlesey'

    (John Whittlesey Sage) Hardy, vigorous and long blooming, John Whittlesey Sage is a hybrid of D'Arcy's Sage (Salvia darcyi) -- a native of Mexico -- and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla), which is native to the American Southwest and Mexico.

    The long flowering season of this sage makes John Whittlesey Sage a garden favorite; it begins bursting with salmon-red blooms early in the growing season. You can grow it as a bedding plant in areas with winters cooler than those of USDA Zone 7. In warmer zones, this tidy sage is an herbaceous perennial.

    In coastal areas, John Whittlesey Sage is a great stand-in for the plethora of little-leaf species -- Mountain Sage, Autumn Sage (S. greggii )and Jame Sage (S. x jamensis) -- that often struggle with humidity. 

    Hummingbirds love the bright red flowers of this full-sun, heat-tolerant plant that makes a tall but effective groundcover. However, it is generally used in mixed borders. 

    Horticulturist Mike Thiede of Chico, California, developed this sage and named it for John Whittlesey of Canyon Creek Nursery in Oroville, California.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x 'Scarlet Spires'

    (Scarlet Spires Sage) This is a brilliant cross between the sturdy D'Arcy's Sage (Salvia darcyi) and the beautifully colored 'Raspberry Delight' Littleleaf Sage (Salvia microphylla 'Raspberry Delight').

    Sometimes children exceed the success of their parents, and that is the case with Scarlet Spires. This is one of our top hummingbird plants as well as one of our best Salvias for cut-flower gardens. It is a long-blooming choice with foot-tall spikes of large, scarlet flowers and attractive gray-green foliage.

    Drought tolerant and dramatic, it is ideal for massing, mixed borders or patio containers. Give it full sun and well-drained soil.

    Highly recommended!

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x jamensis 'Golden Elk'

    (Golden Elk Hybrid Jame Sage) Golden Elk is a pale cream-and-rose flowered hybrid developed by Flowers by the Sea. It is more compact than Salvia x jamensis 'Sierra San Antonio', which it resembles. We think it also has better foliage and larger flowers.

    We love the way Golden Elk's glossy, dark green foliage and the way its flowers blush rosy red as they age, adding to the plant's charm. Golden Elk looks pretty in settings allowing close viewing, such as in patio containers or edging a pathway.

    At our farm on the cool and humid Northern California coast, Golden Elk grows better than many Jame Sages, which are hybrid members of the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (Salvia microphylla) group. Jame Sage is often pastel unlike most Autumn and Mountain sages.

    Native to Mexico and the American Southwest, Jame Sage occurs in areas where the closely related species of Autumn Sage and Mountain Sage meet, such as near the Village of Jame in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains or on our farm.

    Similar to most Jame Sages, Golden Elk is long-blooming, heat tolerant and drought resistant. However, it is also exceptionally cold hardy. Give it plenty of sun, but if you live in an area with extremely hot summers, choose a location offering some afternoon shade.

    Honeybees and butterflies highly recommend it as do humans, but deer resist its charms.

    Highly recommended.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

Average customer rating:
 
(1 reviews)  



1 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Al Robinson
Feb 27, 2014
After purchasing hundreds of plants online for close to 20 years, I have to say that I was very, very impressed with the material from Flowers By The Sea.
The salvias were all packed very protectively but even more impressively was the quality and size of the plants sent. They were very healthy and veryLARGE for being in a 3.5" pot!
Lastly... I am truly looking forward to seeing the beautiful coral color of "California Sunset" salvia in my garden. Very rare color!
Thank you Flowers By The Sea!
Thank you Kermit!
I will be back!
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Pantone Pageant Cheerful Lemon Zest and Nectarine Designer Salvias

Pantone Pageant Cheerful Lemon Zest and Nectarine Designer Salvias


Category: Cultivating Color
Posted: Jun 7, 2013 10:51 AM
Synopsis: Let there be light; let there be brightness. Yellows and oranges are cheerful colors to combine in a grouping of perennials. Pantone's spring 2013 designer colors -- golden yellow Lemon Zest 13-0756 and its hot orange Nectarine 16-1360 -- are fun colors to match to sages (Salvia spp.) that can turn up the light in a garden whether sunny or shady. Two groupings for sunny or shady gardens are offered
New at FBTS: Salvia x jamensis 'California Sunset'

New at FBTS: Salvia x jamensis 'California Sunset'


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: Apr 12, 2013 08:15 PM
Synopsis: Viewing the creamy peach-pink and yellow of California Sunset Autumn Sage (Salvia x jamenis 'California Sunset') may remind you of a Georgia O'Keefe painting. Anyone who has viewed sunset dipping into the mountains of New Mexico knows that soft pastels are common to Southwestern sunsets. Similarly, subtle bicolored combinations of pastels are common characteristics of many S. x jamensis species, which are crosses between various Autumn Sages (Salvia greggii spp.) and Mountain Sages (Salvia microphylla spp.).
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.

Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.