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Tinantia erecta


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Tinantia erecta

Description

(Widow's Tears) Sometimes lumped into the genus Tradescantia, this tender perennial grows so fast - and blooms so prolifically - that growing it as an annual is a worthy use for those in colder Zones. Do you have a shady corner to fill up with a lush, tropical looking plant? If so, this one is for you.

Growing rapidly into a dense mound, the small magenta flowers of this plant go on all season until the first hard frost.  Best in rich soil, but adaptable almost everywhere.  Uncommon and unusual, useful and tough.

Details

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Common name
Widow's Tears
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
48"/60"/48"
Exposure
Partial to full shade
Soil type
Any
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$5.00

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  • Salvia glabrescens 'Shi Ho'

    (Makino) We would grow this rare clone of the woodland Japanese native Salvia glabrescens even if it never flowered, because the hairless, arrow-shaped foliage is so lush, toothed and colorful. As they age, the arrow-shaped leaves transform from yellowish green to dark green.

    This is a plant for moist, shady garden spots, but can take a bit of morning sun. It is hardy as long as it receives plenty of shade, water and soil that is rich and well-drained. In autumn, short spikes of small, pink and purple two-tone flowers rise out of compact basal foliage, creating a gracefully proportioned look.

      Makino should be seen up close both for its extraordinary flowers and lush foliage. Plant it in a container, along a shady pathway or as a woodland groundcover. Although slow growing, this tough yet lovely sage is worth the wait. Fortunately, deer don't like it.

    $13.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Yellow & Purple'

    (Makino) The unusual flower color and short, mounding growth of this clone of Salvia glabrascens -- a woodland Japanese native -- make it distinctive. The blossoms are nearly clear yellow with striking purple beelines.

    This is a good choice for moist, shady garden spots, but can take a bit of morning sun. Makino cultivars are hardy as long as they receive plenty of shade, water and soil that is rich and well-drained. In autumn, short flower spikes rise out of compact, basal foliage, creating a gracefully proportioned look.

    This herbaceous sage should be seen up close both for its extraordinary flowers and lush foliage. Plant it in a container, along a shady pathway or as a woodland groundcover. Although slow growing, this tough yet lovely sage is worth the wait. Fortunately, deer don't like it.

    $11.50
  • Salvia japonica

    (Japanese Woodland Sage or Shu Wei Cao) This short, lavender-flowered, ornamental sage has purple-to-green foliage. In Asia, this woodland plant has long been an important medicinal herb, used in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes.

    Aside from being pretty, the foliage of Salvia japonica has been eaten during times of famine. In addition to Japan, it is found in Korea, China and Taiwan.

    Although its 24-inch spikes of airy flowers are pretty, it is the richly purpled new growth of this mounding sage that particularly attracts attention as a groundcover or border edging. Give it moist, rich soil and partial shade.
    $9.00
  • Salvia macrophylla 'Short Form'

    (Creeping Big Leaf Sage) Cobalt blue flowers float in airy clusters on 12-inch spikes above the velvety, green leaves of this South American native from summer into fall. Short and spreading by woody rhizomes, it is an ideal groundcover.


    The foliage of this herbaceous, perennial sage looks similar to sweet potato leaves. It is dramatic in a container or as the border of a raised planter with its giant, heart-shaped leaves cascading over the sides. Some gardeners grow it as a houseplant.

    Fast-growing, it is adaptable to full sun and full shade. However, a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade may be more to its liking. Heat tolerant and water-loving, this sage is an ideal choice for a humid climate such as Florida's. But don't forget to give it rich, well-drained soil.
    $8.50
  • Salvia nipponica var. Formosana

    (Formosan Woodland Sage or Tai wan qin zhu cao) A native of Taiwan, this Salvia nipponica grows well in hot, humid climates as well as milder locales.

    Blooming throughout fall, bright yellow flowers help this sage lighten a shady garden. Similar to other Woodland Sages, it can handle many sunlight conditions, including partial shade, full shade and a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade.

    The sunny flowers contrast handsomely with the plant's arrowhead-shaped leaves that are deep green on top and hairy purple underneath. The foliage alone makes this a great planting choice for damp, shady spots. However, it needs somewhat warmer climes -- USDA Zones 7 to 9 -- than our other woodland sages.

    Spreading gently, Formosana eventually clumps densely to become an effective groundcover. Grow this plant in rich, moist soil and give it plenty of water.

    And if that's not enough, consider that this sage is an important anti-inflammatory herb in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. In the West, ongoing medical research is beginning to support this and show Formosana's role as an antioxidant as well.

    $10.00
  • Salvia urticifolia

    (Nettle Leaf Sage) Native from the Southeastern United States up to Pennyslvania in the Mid-Atlantic, this colorful herbaceous perennial is an endangered species in Florida, Kentucky and Maryland.

    This short sage's common and botanical names refer to its prickly leaves, which resemble those of Stinging Nettle, Urtica diocea. Its rich, numerous, violet flowers have prominent white beelines and are about 1/2 inch long. They grow on foot-long spikes from summer into fall and are cupped by fuzzy, dark gray-green bracts.

    This is a vibrant plant for a shady garden, especially in a damp woodland setting. It does well in morning shade, partial shade and full shade. For best growth, give it well-drained soil and average watering based on local conditions. Although it is a water lover, it can survive drought when established.

    This US native deserves much greater prominence in our gardens. Honeybees and butterflies love it.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia chiapensis

    (Chiapas Sage) This partial-shade Salvia produces magenta flowers year round for us on the Mendocino Coast. It's compact, free flowering and not bothered by pests whether large or small. It is native to Mexico's coastal mountains at an elevation of 7,000 to 9,500 feet.

    Chiapas Sage forms a neat mound of glossy, ribbed leaf-foliage with large flower spikes throughout. We grow it in mixed borders, containers and combination planters where it really stands out.  Winter mulching it is essential in Zone 8 and below where you can treat this drought-resistant plant as a perennial.
    $8.50
  • Salvia guaranitica 'Omaha Gold'

    (Variegated Anise-Scented Sage) Rumpled and lance-shaped, the spectacular leaves of this sage are yellowish-lime with splotches of emerald. Rub them and you smell anise, a licorice-like scent. The bountiful, cobalt blue flowers cover the plant from summer into fall.

    One of the larger varieties of Anise-Scented Sage, Omaha Gold needs some support, especially in windy areas. Planting it at the base of a climbing rose can lead to lovely peek-a-boo surprises. It also does well in borders, woodland gardens and moist parts of the yard. Full sun is okay, but it enjoys morning sun with afternoon shade.

    This is an excellent candidate for a container in a protected area as it tends to be more tender and a little less vigorous than other members of its species. When new growth begins in early spring, cut the old growth down to the ground for a more pleasing shape and profuse bloom.

    The nomenclature of this plant is confusing. Some say it is a hybrid; some call it a sport of Salvia guaranitica 'Costa Rica Blue'. Of course, some say Costa Rica Blue is a hybrid. Go figure. In any case, this is a fine Anise-Scented Sage.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia vitiifolia

    (Grape Leaf Sage) Tall spikes of intensely blue flowers bloom summer to fall and emerge in profusion from handsome, furry foliage. The leaves are grape green on top and purplish on the bottom. This water-loving sage grows rapidly into a spreading mound.

    Grow this one in full sun in cooler areas or in partial shade where summers are hot.  Good drainage is essential along with rich soil for best results. This showy sage from Oaxaca, Mexico, is ideal for patio planters and damp woodland gardens in USDA Zones 8 to 11.

    We highly recommend this sage, which is relatively new to the horticultural trade in the US. There is, however, some confusion about its identity. Some sources say it should be called Salvia serboana.

    $8.00

    OUT OF STOCK

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