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Amorphophallus konjac


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  • Cultural Icons

  • Customer Reviews

  • Attracting Butterflies

  • Deer Tips

Amorphophallus konjac



Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Shipping Information
Looking for a larger quantity?

Description

(Konjac) Call it what you like -- Corpse Flower, Devil's Tongue, Elephant Yam, Voodoo Lily or just plain Konjac -- but Amorphophallus konjac is a super sized surprise. It's native to subtropical and tropical Asian woodlands where it tolerates both cold and heat.

This member of the family Araceae can rise up shoulder high, but is related to the much shorter aroids Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) and Farge's Cobra Lily (A. fargesii).

The large dark flower is displayed on a tall stalk for up to a month in the early spring. Once flowering ends, a highly ornamental leaf resembling a finely cut umbrella emerges rapidly and grows up to four feet tall and wide. The leaf remains until the end of the growing season.

Konjac corms can remain in ground in Zones 6 - 10. In areas with colder winters, dig them up for storage until the next growing season. We offer two- and three-year-old corms -- growing in deep perennial pots -- which should bloom in one to two years.

Asian cultures -- especially the Japanese -- eat Konjac root as a gummy product called yam cake, which is often made into shirataki noodles. Yam cake has little flavor and is more firm than gelatin. It is also used to make washi, a tough paper that is traditionally used to make clothing and other durable items.

Details

Product rating
 
(1 reviews)  

In stock
1 item(s) available

Common name  
Konjac
USDA Zones  
6 - 10
Size (h/w/fh)  
48"/48"/60"
Exposure  
Partial shade
Soil type  
Rich and well drained
Water needs  
Average to ample
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
15.00

Options

Quantity (1 available)




Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full shade
Full shade
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Culinary herb
Culinary herb
Medicinal herb
Medicinal herb

Growing Habit

6 - 10
6 - 10
48 inches tall
48 inches tall
48 inches wide
48 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Spring blooming
Spring blooming

Wildlife

Butterflies
Butterflies
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Average customer rating:
 
(1 reviews)  



1 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Anachron
Jul 17, 2015
Just received mine yesterday. Pot contained 2 of these little beauties. Very healthy, nice size specimens that already have an umbrella of leaves. No damage from shipping.
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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.

Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.