Search: Advanced Search

Security Seals

Printable version

Arisaema fargesii


  • Details

  • Cultural Icons

  • Compatible Plants

  • Customer Reviews

  • Deer Tips

Arisaema fargesii




Shipping Information
Looking for a larger quantity?

Description

(Farges's Cobra Lily) Arisaema fargessii lends a fairytale look to a damp woodland garden. Its large white and dark purple striped bract -- called a spathe -- curves over the plant's infloresence, a finger-like structure called a spadix.

The wide spathe may stay upright for awhile, but eventually drapes downward gracefully and narrows to a point.

Farges's Cobra Lily grows from a bulb. When mature, its large, tripartite leaves are heavily lobed. Although a water lover, it does fine with an average amount of supplemental watering based on local rainfall. It tolerates heat and survives sharp winter cold to bloom again.

Give this petite plant rich, well-drained soil and a location with partial shade to full sun. It does well when planted in the ground or in containers.

Although Farges's Cobra Lily may look tender and yummy to the human eye, deer don't like it. Fortunately, Father Paul Guillaume Farges (1844-1912) -- a naturalist and French missionary to China -- did like the plant and collected it in Asia for further study. That's why its scientific and common names bear his surname.

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
Out of stock

Common name  
Farges's Cobra Lily
USDA Zones  
5 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)  
18"/18"/18"
Exposure  
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type  
Rich and well drained
Water needs  
Ample
Pot size  
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
15.00

Options



Email me when back in stock  
Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

5 - 11
5 - 11
18 inches tall
18 inches tall
18 inches wide
18 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Spring blooming
Spring blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant
  • Arisaema consanguineum 'Poseidon'

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) As its name implies, Poseidon is a tall, commanding Arisaema. We offer you a well-established clump that will reward you by blooming the first year that you plant it.

    Poseidon's spathe is deep green and purple. It is a leaf-like blossom that wraps around and hangs over the finger-like spadix with its tip coming to a long, thin point. It looks a bit like a cobra hissing. Its blue-green, radial leaves spread out like spokes at the top of the plant's stalk -- called a psuedostem -- and have silver stripes down the center of each blade. Give this majestic plant full sun to partial shade and rich, well-drained soil.

    Most Arisaemas are from Asia where they are known as Cobra Lilies. Arisaema consanguineum is native to lowlands as well as alpine areas in China, India, Taiwan, Thailand and Tibet. North American species are commonly called Jack in the Pulpit.

    Plantswoman Ellen Hornig, who is particularly renowned for the Arisaemas she grew at the former Seneca Hill Perennials nursery in Ithaca, New York, bred this excellent cultivar. It grows well in full sun and survives chilly winters.

    Arisaemas are used medically in herbal formulas, but should be carefully processed for safe consumption.

    17.00
  • Arisaema consanguineum 'Siren's Song'

    (Himalayan Cobra Lily) Siren's Song is tall, but a bit shorter than the Poseidon cultivar of this woodland species. We offer you well-established clumps that will reward you by blooming the first year that you plant them.

    The spathe of Siren's Song is a leaf-like blossom that wraps around and hangs over the plant's finger-like spadix with its tip coming to a long, thin point. It looks a bit like a cobra hissing. Its blue-green, radial leaves, are wide and wavy. They spread out like spokes at the top of the plant's stalk and have wide silver stripes down the center of each blade. Give this plant full sun to partial shade and rich, well-drained soil.

    Most Arisaemas are from Asia where they are known as Cobra Lilies. Arisaema consanguineum is native to lowlands as well as alpine areas in China, India, Taiwan, Thailand and Tibet. North American species are commonly called Jack in the Pulpit.

    Plantswoman Ellen Hornig, who is particularly renowned for the Arisaemas she grew at the former Seneca Hill Perennials nursery in Ithaca, New York, bred this excellent cultivar. It grows well in full sun to partial shade and survives chilly winters.

    Arisaemas are used medically in herbal formulas, but should be carefully processed for safe consumption.

    17.00
    New!
  • Salvia japonica

    (Japanese Woodland Sage or Shu Wei Cao) This short, lavender-flowered, ornamental sage has purple-to-green foliage. In Asia, this woodland plant has long been an important medicinal herb, used in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes.

    Aside from being pretty, the foliage of Salvia japonica has been eaten during times of famine. In addition to Japan, it is found in Korea, China and Taiwan.

    Although its 24-inch spikes of airy flowers are pretty, it is the richly purpled new growth of this mounding sage that particularly attracts attention as a groundcover or border edging. Give it moist, rich soil and partial shade.

    11.50
  • Salvia bowleyana

    (Nan dan shen) Lavender and pearly white blossoms shaped like parrot beaks are supported by burgundy and green calyxes on this cold-tolerant plant from Southern China. In summer, the flowers grow in whorl-like clusters on spikes reaching up to 5 feet tall above large, fuzzy, pinnate, olive-green leaves.

    This rare plant is closely related to China’s famed medicinal dan shen sage, which is known botanically as Salvia miltiorrhiza. Nan dan shen means Southern dan shen.

    Dan shen-type herbal medicines are derived from the fleshy red taproots of these Salvias and are the subject of ongoing medical research. They are used to treat a variety of health problems, including strokes, chest pain, menstrual difficulties and liver disease.

    Nan dan shen is found south of the Yangtze River in south central and southeastern Chinese provinces. It grows at elevations of about 1,000 to 3,000 feet in damp woodlands and beside water. Consequently, although this sage can get by on average watering, it is a water lover that is a good choice for damp problem spots in your yard or for woodland-style gardens. Use it as a perennial border or container plant in partial shade.

    This deer-resistant sage grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9 in rich, well-drained soil where it can spread up to 3 feet wide. British botanist Stephen Troyte Dunn (1868-1938), a China specialist, gave nan dan shen its scientific name in 1908. Don't confuse this sage with Salvia bulleyana, which also has bicolor flowers.

    16.00
  • Salvia nubicola

    (Himalayan Cloud Sage) Nepal's Muktinath Valley -- a sacred site for Hindus and Buddhists -- is the place to go to see this majestically tall shade perennial in the wild. It grows at altitudes up to 14,000 feet and often emerges while the ground is still snowy.

    The creamy yellow flowers have thin purple markings and bloom throughout summer. They grow about 1 to 1 1/2 inches long on flower spikes that rise up 4 feet or taller by late summer. 

    In America, this fragrant, cold-hardy sage is adaptable from USDA Zone 5 to 10. In cooler climates, it grows well in full sun whereas a bit of shade is best In warmer zones. We find that it thrives in rich, well-drained garden soil with ample water. However, it is resilient and survives in less than ideal conditions.

    Use this sage in mixed perennial borders and moist woodland gardens. It is also eye-catching as an accent plant and sensual due to its fragrance. You might want to try it in locations where you are likely to brush against it, such as an entryway. 

    We love and highly recommend this one. Demand often exceeds supply; deer resist it, but customers can't.
     

    10.50
  • Salvia trijuga

    So what do all those Pinyin words mean in this sage’s common name? We’ll give you an answer to the best of our ability in a minute. Meanwhile, we need to note that this medicinal Asian sage has handsome foliage and deep violet flowers.

    The flower spikes bloom from summer to fall, attracting butterflies. This sage loves shade and water. Cold and heat tolerant, it grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9.

    Give it rich, well-drained soil similar to the kind where it is found in the wild. San ye shu wei cao grows along the margins of high-altitude forests that border grassy hillsides in Southwestern China. Its dark green, basal leaves are oval-to-heart shaped with pretty, scalloped margins. The foliage mound rises up 24 to 32 inches and spreads about the same distance.

    Good uses include plantings in moist areas such as woodland gardens. This perennial sage also shows well in borders, along pathways where you can see it up close and as a groundcover.

    Current medical research indicates that chemicals in this plant’s bright red taproots may be effective in battling liver cancer. Similar to many Asian sages, it has a long history of use in herbal remedies. The substances in its roots are used for a variety of medical purposes, including strengthening the immune system, stimulating circulation, soothing the mind, relieving restlessness and improving blood flow to the brain.

    We don’t speak Chinese, but after a bit of searching, we discovered that the phrase ‘shu wei cao’ refers to sage. ‘San’ means ‘three’ and ‘ye’ means leaf. So it’s a three-leafed sage, which means that there are three leaves on each petiole.

    12.50
    New!
There have been no reviews


Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.