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Salvia Companions

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Salvia Companions

Similar to many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae), sages (Salvia spp.) aren't demanding. Most are low-fuss plants that are easy to grow if placed in the right location. This list suggests Salvia companion plants, many of which are also low-fuss, mint family members. They add attractive variety to the Salvia garden.

The growing requirements for any plant depend on the temperature range, soil, elevation, sunshine, moisture level and other features of the plant's native land. Great companions have similar cultural needs. So when selecting companion plants, it's necessary to consider whether their needs are compatible with those of the sages you plan to grow.

Gardeners and writers often refer to the Salvia genus as being heat tolerant and drought resistant. Although this is true of many species, there are ones that need regular watering and some that like ample moisture.

Similarly, some sages need partial shade at some point during the day whereas others almost seem to shout 'Bring on the sun; bring on the heat!' The moisture level of shady areas is another consideration. Plants that need ample water are unlikely to grow well in dry shade whereas damp shade won't do for dry garden shade plants.

This list of companions contains plants for dry, regular and damp gardens as well as for full sun and partial shade. Compare the plant descriptions -- from cold hardiness to bloom seasons -- with those for your sages and you will create companionable relationships in the garden.

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Plants


  • Acanthus mollis 'Tasmanian Angel'

    (Variegated Bear's Breeches) Found in Tasmania, this gem is the first variegated Acanthus! 'Tasmanian Angel' offers striking, bold leaves with white margins and mottling.

    13.50
     


  • Agastache cana 'Sinning'

    (Sonoran Sunset® Anise Hyssop) An abundance of lavender-rose flowers mark Agastache cana 'Sinning' as being unique from the typical purple-flowered plants of its species. Colorado plantsman Duane Sinning discovered this lovely hybrid.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache rugosa 'Heronswood Mist'

    (Anise Hyssop) Although most varieties of Agastache (Anise Hyssop) come from the American Southwest and Northern Mexico, this is an Asian variety that is native to Korea, Japan and China. It is a magnet for butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    9.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Ava'

    (Ava Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Raspberry calyxes support Ava's rosy-pink flowers, which whorl on tall spikes similar to many Salvias. When the blossoms are spent, the calyxes remain colorful. This long-blooming hummingbird magnet is tolerant of cold, heat and drought.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Coral'

    (Kudos Coral Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of deep coral flowers are accented by mid-green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Coral is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Gold'

    (Kudos Gold Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Compact spikes of burnished gold, tubular flowers attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds to the latest Kudos Agastache from Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries. The dense flower plumes are accented by mid-green, veined, spear-shaped leaves.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Mandarin'

    (Kudos Mandarin Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Dense plumes of creamy orange flowers are accented by deep green foliage in this heat- and drought-tolerant favorite of pollinators. Kudos Mandarin is a compact, clumping, semi-dwarf variety.

    10.50
    14.95 save 30%


  • Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'

    (Kudos Yellow Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Flowers by the Sea is one of the first nurseries nationwide to grow Agastache x 'Kudos Yellow'. This is one of the best deep yellow Agastaches we've found, due to its large, dense flower spikes and bushy, upright form.

    10.50
     


  • Agastache x 'Violet Vision'

    (Violet Vision Hybrid Anise Hyssop) Wands of deep violet blossoms rise up from heart-shaped, mid-green leaves in this compact, upright Agastache developed by Oregon's Terra Nova Nurseries. Flowers and foliage alike have a sweet honey-licorice fragrance.

    10.50
     


  • Amorphophallus konjac

    (Konjac) Call it what you like -- Corpse Flower, Devil's Tongue, Elephant Yam, Voodoo Lily or just plain Konjac -- but Amorphophallus konjac is a super sized surprise. It's native to subtropical and tropical Asian woodlands where it tolerates both cold and heat.

    15.00
     


  • Anisacanthus wrightii

    (Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its bright orange trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    10.50
     


  • Anisacanthus wrightii 'Pumpkin Orange'

    (Orange Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its clear, pumpkin-orange trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    10.50
     


  • Anisacanthus wrightii 'Select Red'

    (Red Texas Firecracker) Hummingbirds and butterflies will thank you with frequent visits if you add this long-blooming plant to your wildlife garden. Its bright red trumpet-type flowers with long, narrow petals are wells of delicious nectar.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias cancellata

    (Wild Cotton) From the winter rainfall area of southern Africa, this shrubby and unusual Milkweed is especially common in the Western Cape region.  An especially tough plant, we have noted that the Monarch larvae that migrate through our area seem to prefer this over all other species.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias curassavica 'Orange Form'

    (Orange Bloodflower) Vivid orange and gold clusters of tiny, star-shaped flowers contrast handsomely with the dark green, lance-shaped leaves of Orange Bloodflower. Other common names include Tropical Milkweed and Mexican Butterfly Weed.

    9.50
     


  • Asclepias curassavica 'Silky Gold'

    (Golden Bloodflower) Easy to cultivate, whether as an annual or tender perennial, Golden Bloodflower is a South American native that Monarchs and other butterflies love. Unlike Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), this species doesn't have a taproot. This means that it is easier to control the plant's spread.

    9.50
     


  • Asclepias eriocarpa

    (Indian Milkweed) It's the hairy, minty green foliage of Asclepias eriocarpa -- not its star-like, pink and cream flowers filled with nectar -- that is most valuable to Monarch butterflies.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias hallii

    (Hall's Milkweed) Although drought resistant, the rare Asclepias hallii prefers moist soil because it is accustomed to the snowmelt of its homelands in the foothills and mountains of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'

    (Swamp Milkweed) The light green of this Milkweed's slender, lance-shaped leaves compliment its rose-pink umbels of tiny, star-shaped flowers that smell like vanilla. As its common name implies, this plant is a great solution for saturated soils, such as in rain gardens and the edge of ponds. Yet it can get by on average watering based on local conditions.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet'

    (Swamp Milkweed) Umbels of tiny, star-shaped flowers bloom from summer into fall forming clouds of white amid the dark green, slender, lance-shaped leaves of Ice Ballet. Although this is a water-lover comfortable in rain gardens and by the side of ponds, Ice Ballet can get by with average watering based on local conditions.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias physocarpa

    (Swan Plant) Elegant white flowers with purple inner markings change into lime green-to-gold balloon-shaped seedpods in this South African milkweed that Monarch butterflies love. The seedpods are 2 to 2 1/2 inches in diameter.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias speciosa

    (Showy Milkweed) Milkweeds (Asclepias spp. ) are must-have, nectar-rich plants in the butterfly garden. They're the only species on which the endangered Monarch butterfly lays eggs. It is urgent that we offer this pretty, fragrant wildflower.

    10.50
     


  • Asclepias syriaca

    (Common Milkweed) Star shaped and creamy pink, the tiny, multitudinous flowers of Asclepias syriaca form globes. These umbels make it easy for butterflies to perch while feeding. The plant's form is attractively vertical.
    10.50
     


  • Asclepias tuberosa

    (Butterfly Weed) Butterfly Weed produces flat-topped umbels of tiny, star-shaped flowers atop narrow, lance-shaped leaves. Bright orange and nectar-rich, they bloom from summer into fall.

    10.50
     


    New!
  • Asclepias verticillata

    (Whorled Milkweed) Verticillasters are whorl-like clusters of flowers on flower stems. In Asclepias verticillata, which is commonly called Whorled or Horsetail Milkweed, multiple umbels of creamy white, star-shaped blossoms appear to twirl around the floral stems.

    10.50
     


  • Cantua buxifolia 'Golden Inca'

    (Golden Sacred flower of the Incas) Long, golden yellow flowers with a rosy blush to their flared, trumpet-like corollas contrast with mid-green foliage in this long-blooming variety of the South American species Cantua buxifolia.

    10.50
     


  • Cantua buxifolia 'Hot Pants'

    (Bicolor Sacred Flower of the Incas) Four-inch-long trumpet blossoms in a neon combination of red-orange and hot pink contrast with mid-green foliage in Cantua buxifolia 'Hot Pants'. This is a hybrid of a long blooming, South American native.

    10.50
     


  • Cantua buxifoloa

    (Sacred flower of the Incas) Long reddish blossoms with flared, trumpet-like corollas and bright blue pollen contrast with mid-green foliage in the long-blooming, South American species Cantua buxifolia.

    10.50
     


  • Centaurea gymnocarpa

    (Velvet Centaurea) Lacy, velvety foliage gives this tough shrub its common name. The globular, thistle-like flowers are lavender to fuchsia pink and contrast elegantly with the silvery green of the leaves.

    10.50
     


  • Centradenia floribunda

    (Spanish Shawl) This is one of these plants that stops most people in their tracks. The deep purple/pink, standout flowers are show stoppers in and of themselves - but the furry leaves, which start green and mature to a bronze red are unique and unforgettable.

    10.50
     


  • Cestrum 'Orange Peel'

    (Orange Peel Jessamine) Mainly fragrant at night, the orange and yellow flowers of Cestrum 'Orange Peel' are the result of a cross between Night-Blooming Cestrum (C. nocturnum) and Day-Blooming Cestrum (C. diurnum).

    10.50
     


  • Cuphea 'Minnie Mouse'

    (Minnie Mouse Ears) Floriferous and heat tolerant, Cuphea 'Minnie Mouse' is also a long-blooming addition to wildlife gardens. Similar to Salvias, Cupheas are rich sources of nectar that fuel hummingbird migration. Bees, butterflies and hoverflies are among the other pollinators that love this genus.

    10.00
     


  • Cuphea 'Strybing Sunset'

    Floriferous and heat tolerant, Cuphea 'Strybing Sunset' is a long-blooming addition to wildlife gardens. Similar to Salvias, Cupheas are rich sources of nectar that fuel hummingbird migration. Bees, butterflies and hoverflies are among the other pollinators that love this genus.

    10.00
     


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  • Cuphea aff. aequipetala

    (Mexican Loosestrife) The tempting, purple-to-magenta flowers of Cuphea aff. aequipetala attract butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds as well as gardeners who love color. Abundant blossoms flare into six-petal corollas at the end of long, cylindrical flowers.

    9.50
     


  • Cuphea cyanea v. hirtella

    (Pink Mouse Cuphea)Two tiny, dark purple petals at the end of hot pink and yellow tubular flowers give this hummingbird magnet the "mouse" part of its common name. This is one of the mid-sized Cuphea subshrubs.

    10.50
     


  • Cuphea micropetala

    (Candy Corn Plant) Due to their bright colors and rich nectar, Cupheas are magnets for pollinators, including butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. That's certainly true for the orange and yellow, candy-corn colored flowers of Cuphea micropetala.

    10.50
     




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Reviews


Such a wonderful plant - big and bold fuzzy leaves with a pleasant fruity fragrance. Planted in big pots in partial shade. They've been very happy in the hot humid summer - love lots of water. Wish I could bring them inside to over winter when it ...
Susan in MN
Aug 11, 2016