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Salvia splendens ‘Lighthouse Red'


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Salvia splendens ‘Lighthouse Red'
Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Limited Availability Plant
Limited Availability

Available April to July only.

Learn more
Best of Class
Best of Class
We believe this to be the best medium growing red Scarlet Sage.

Description

(Lighthouse Red Scarlet Sage) This Scarlet Sage is raring to bloom and often begins flowering when less than 6 inches tall. That is a major reason why it is the only one of the many truly red varieties of this species that we grow.

Here are more reasons for our choice: Lighthouse Red never stops blooming all season and is tough enough to grow in severe Texas heat, torrential Florida rainstorms and California humidity. Also, the tall clusters of large crimson flowers do remind us of a lighthouse --something you can see from a great distance.

Lighthouse Red is a tender perennial that may return yearly to the warmest parts of its range, which encompasses USDA Zones 9 to 11. Aim for success by providing partial shade, rich soil and ample water for this Brazilian native. However, this variety is more tolerant than most. A combination of morning sun and afternoon shade works well, but it can also flourish in full shade.

Grow this dramatic variety in a container or mass it for a spectacular color statement. We highly recommend it and so do hummingbirds.

Details

Product rating
 
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In stock
8 item(s) available

Common name
Lighthouse Red Scarlet Sage
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
36"/24"/26"
Exposure
Partial shade
Soil type
Well drained & rich
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$6.50

Options

Quantity (8 available)

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full shade
Full shade
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Indoor plant
Indoor plant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
24 inches wide
24 inches wide

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Cuphea nelsonii

    (Nelson's Bat-Faced Cuphea) A tiny snout-like face emerges at the end of this Cuphea's tubular flower and beneath two red-orange petals shaped like bat ears. "Too cute!" is a typical response to these whimsical flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

    Lance-shaped, mid-green leaves cover the slender stems of this petite subshrub -- a plant with both woody and soft herbaceous growth. Most Cupheas are native to Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean. In the U.S. they are perennial in areas with warm winters.

    San Francisco's Strybing Arboretum notes that the floral structure of a Cuphea often is referred to as a calyx flower, because calyx and flower are one rather than being separate. While some Cupheas have no petals, bat-faced varieties have either 2 or 6.

    Cuphea nelsonii is a long-blooming species from Central America with a trailing habit that is ideal for raised beds. It is a magnet for pollinators that grows well in full sun to partial shade. In areas with chilly winters, it is a good houseplant or seasonal bedding choice.

    Outdoors, Cuphea nelsonii is excellent for edging, container planting and suppressing weeds as groundcover. Although it thrives with average watering based on local conditions, this is a water-loving plant and can serve as a solution in moist areas of your yard.

    $7.50
  • Impatiens niamniamensis ‘African Queen’

    (Congo Cockatoo) Busy Lizzie this is not! Vivid candy-corn colors and nectar spurs arched similar to cockatoo beaks make Impatiens niamniamensis 'African Queen' an unusual sight.

    Except for its glossy, deep green, veined leaves, you might not identify this unusual plant as being related to the flat-petaled Impatiens walleriana that began taking over the shade in home gardens beginning in the 1950s. Congo Cockatoo comes from the flashier side of the family.

    This tall Impatiens has dark succulent stems. As the stems darken and thicken over time, it begins to look like a tiny tree.

    Congo Cockatoo was first collected in South Sudan where the Niam-Niam tribe live and once practiced cannibalism. It's one of about 1,000 Impatiens species and is native to a broad swath of Central Africa from Kenya west to Cameroon. In the U.S., it grows best as a houseplant or in patio containers in warm-winter areas.

    Similar to many members of its genus, this is a long-blooming plant. It tolerates heat, but needs lots of water as well as partial to full shade. For in-ground planting, this is one to consider if you live in a hot, humid area and have damp shady spots in your yard.

    $8.00
  • Salvia 'Amistad'

    (Friendship Sage) Thank you Rolando Uria of the University of Buenos Aries for this very fine plant. Discovered in 2005 at a plant show in Argentina, this truly unique hybrid sage has generated a great deal of excitement in the Salvia world. We are happy to be able to offer this plant which we test grew in 2012 for sale in the Spring of 2013.

    Rolando Uria at the Salvia Summit II

    Growing to about four feet tall, this variety starts blooming when very small and never stops. Large rich royal purple flowers are highlighted dark bracts - all displayed on many-flowered inflorescence. The foliage is something like S. guarantica and something like S. mexicana, but it's true origins are unknown.

    According to Rolando (pictured here at the Salvia Summit II in March 2013) this plant is replacing Salvia guarantica in the gardens of Buenos Aires. It resembles some of the purple Anise Scented Sages, but is an absolutely unique plant.

    A true hummingbird magnet, use this fine plant as a specimen, in mass for bedding, in a container or in the perennial border. The true temperature hardiness of Amistad is still imperfectly understood, but the plant has handled 20 degree weather for us.

    $8.50
  • Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'

    (Forest Fire Tropical Sage) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the abundant, fire engine red flowers of this mostly annual sage. It's a popular cultivar of one of the first Salvias used for ornamental purposes -- Tropical Sage. The flowers are dramatically framed by reddish black bracts.

    A tender perennial in mild climates, this compact plant belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. Thomas Jefferson grew this drought-resistant, low-maintenance sage. Today, it is a favorite in borders and containers.

    Plant this long blooming, spectacularly showy sage in full sun or partial shade wherever you need a big splash of color. Give it regular watering and rich soil.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Pink'

    (Summer Jewel Pink Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner, which is an outstanding choice for bright pink & white color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    Summer Jewel is easy to grow and a great addition to annual flower beds or containers. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. Plant it in full sun or partial shade as a tender perennial in mild climates and as an annual elsewhere. Reaching up to 36 inches tall and 24 inches wide, this sage is an ideal border plant. Use it where you want to create intense color and attract pollinators.

    One of our Top 10 Hummingbird Plants, this sage belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. We consider it indispensable due to its long bloom, low maintenance and spectacular show.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Red'

    (Summer Jewel Red Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner, which is an outstanding choice for bright red color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    Summer Jewel is easy to grow and a great addition to annual flower beds or containers. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. Plant it in full sun or partial shade as a tender perennial in mild climates and as an annual elsewhere. Reaching up to 36 inches tall and 24 inches wide, this sage is an ideal border plant. Use it where you want to create intense color and attract pollinators.

    One of our Top 10 Hummingbird Plants, this sage belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. We consider it indispensable due to its long bloom, low maintenance and spectacular show.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia raymondii ssp. mairanae

    (Bolivian Mountain Sage) Neon lilac-pink flowers light up the handsome, furry foliage of this distinctive sage from high in the Andes cloud forests. Its large, textured leaves have purple undersides. Unhappy in dry heat, this is a very showy plant for humid coastal areas.

    In our mild coastal climate, Bolivian Mountain Sage does well in full sun; however, partial shade and ample water are keys to success in hotter, drier areas. It also appreciates rich, well-drained soil.

    In the ground, this sage grows into a shrub up to 5 feet tall in Zone 9 to 11. Or plant it in a large container as a natural focal point on a partially shady patio. It also works well as a seasonal bedding plant. But remember that this water-loving sage particularly appreciates morning sun and afternoon shade.

    In mild climates, it blooms year round, so this is a great choice for gardens where hummingbirds winter over. As with so many Salvias, this one is deer resistant.

    Limited seasonal availability.

    $8.50
  • Salvia splendens van houttei 'Burgundy'

    (Burgundy Scarlet Sage) Blood red to burgundy, the drooping blossoms of this sturdy, long flowering Salvia are the first that anyone comments on in a mixed planting. Use it singly as a dramatic garden accent or container plant; mass it for a stunning effect.

    Meet its needs and Salvia splendens van houttei 'Burgundy' is easy to grow. Plant it in partial to full shade where you can give it rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. It can grow more than 3 feet tall, but can easily be kept to a height of 2 feet with minimal pinching.

    This variety of Scarlet Sage is dramatic in woodland gardens. An annual in colder zones, it is a tender perennial in warmer ones.

    Seasonally available and limited.

    $8.50
  • Salvia splendens van houttei 'Dancing Flame'

    (Variegated Scarlet Sage) Crimson flowers topping bright yellow foliage mottled with deep green make this one of the most spectacular Salvias we grow. There are numerous clones of this variety of the tender perennial throughout the U.S. nursery trade, but we consider ours to be the best, as it originated in our nursery.

    Meet its needs and Salvia splendens van houttei 'Dancing Flame' is easy to grow. Plant it in partial to full shade where you can give it rich, well-drained soil and regular watering.

    Although short and compact, this Scarlet Sage is dramatic in woodland gardens and annual flowerbeds as well as in patio containers and indoors as a houseplant. Outdoors, it is an annual in colder zones and a tender perennial in warmer ones where it can bloom 12 months a year.

    Seasonally available and limited.

    $7.50
  • Salvia splendens van houttei 'Peach'

    (Peach Scarlet Sage) A subtle but beautiful peachy orange, the drooping blossoms of this sturdy, long flowering Salvia are the first that anyone comments on in a mixed planting. Use it singly as a dramatic garden accent or container plant; mass it for a stunning effect.

    Meet its needs and Salvia splendens van houttei 'Peach' is easy to grow. Plant it in partial to full shade where you can give it rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. It can grow more than 3 feet tall, but can easily be kept to a height of 2 feet with minimal pinching.

    This variety of Scarlet Sage is dramatic in woodland gardens. An annual in colder zones, it is a tender perennial in warmer ones.

    Seasonally available and limited.

    $8.50
  • Salvia splendens ‘Reddy White Surprise'

    (Dwarf Scarlet Sage) Rich red-orange blossoms pop out of white bracts on this petite sage that seems to bloom year round in mild climates. The smooth, well-veined foliage is an attractive deep green.

    Growing only 10 inches tall and 16 inches wide, it is just the right size for edging an annual flower bed. Reddy White also works well in a patio container plant or as a houseplant. It is a tender perennial that may return yearly to the warmest parts of its range, which encompasses USDA Zones 9 to 11.

    To succeed, this variety of Scarlet Sage needs partial shade all day or a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade. It can even flower in full shade. Native to Brazil, Salvia splendens is a species that appreciates rich soil and ample water.

    Highly recommended.

    $6.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia splendens ‘Sao Borja’

    (Sao Borja Scarlet Sage) Three-inch-long, smokey purple blossoms that bloom from spring to fall are a major clue that this heat-tolerant perennial is not your grandmother's Scarlet Sage.

    Even when grown as an annual, Salvia splendens 'Sao Borja' brings a tropical look to any garden by reaching an impressive height of 6 feet or taller in one season.

    This Brazilian native grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11 where it is a tender perennial that may return yearly to the warmest parts of its range. 

    Sao Borja was discovered in the port city of Sao Borja, which is named after Spain's Saint Francis Borgia. The city is located on the Uruguay River, across from Argentina and in Rio Grande do Sul, which is the southernmost state of Brazil and borders the Atlantic coast.

    To succeed, Sao Borja Scarlet Sage needs partial shade all day or a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade. It also requires rich soil and ample water for a spring surge of growth that needs to be seen to be believed. Use it as a screen, an accent plant or in a container, which will limit size.

    Highly recommended.

    $7.50
  • Salvia subrotunda

    (Giant Brazilian Sage) Yes, this one is gigantic. The first season we grew this heat-tolerant sage, it reached 8 feet tall by July! Masses of small, red-orange, trumpet-shaped flowers attract hummingbirds and honeybees to long, upward curving flower spikes towering over heart-shaped foliage.

    Giant Brazilian Sage is difficult to beat for attracting pollinators. Its flowers are similar to those of Tropical Sage (Salvia coccinea), which is like a dwarf compared to this grand plant. Giant Brazilian Sage flowers from mid-spring until frost and loves rich, well-drained soil. Although average watering is all that is necessary, it can handle excessive moisture.

    This statuesque beauty makes a fine screen or background planting, but also does well in containers. It comes from the Iguazu Falls region that forms a border between Brazil and Argentina. In the U.S., it is surprisingly hardy and reliably perennial in mild climates such as Zone 9 and, perhaps, the warmest reaches of Zone 8.

    Plant this lush sage where you can stand back and appreciate its mass of blooms. It does best with regular water and some shade in the hottest areas, very much like Tropical Sage. A location with morning sun and afternoon shade is ideal.

    Seasonally available.

    Thank you Russ Thompson for the additional pictures.
    $6.00

    OUT OF STOCK

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New at FBTS: Ember's Wish & Love and Wishes Salvias

New at FBTS: Ember's Wish & Love and Wishes Salvias


Category: New at FBTS
Posted: Jul 25, 2014 12:28 PM
Synopsis: Plants contribute to our lives in many ways -- as sources of beauty, building materials, clothing, food, fragrance, medicine and oxygen. Add hope and fulfillment to the list, because that is what three abundantly blooming Salvias from Australia add to the lives of seriously ill children. These plants form the Wish Collection -- Wendy's Wish Sage, Ember's Wish Sage, and Love and Wishes Sage. Flowers by the Sea is one of the first online nurseries in America to sell all three. Although we have grown and sold Wendy's Wish for a number of years, Ember's Wish and Love and Wishes are new at FBTS.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.