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Salvia caymanensis


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Salvia caymanensis
Time to think about Fall Planting
This plant is
Ideal for Fall Planting

Shipping Information
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Description

(Cayman Island Sage) Compact and intensely fragrant, this shrubby sage is excellent for containers or the edge of a pathway. Small blue and white flowers mass about its densely branched foliage. It loves rich, moist soil and warm weather.

Cayman Island Sage does well in full sun or partial shade. However, it goes semi-dormant during cool weather, so in colder zones it should be grown as an annual or a greenhouse container plant. In warmer areas, it makes a fine ground cover or woodland garden plant.

When children visit FBTS, this rare Salvia always wins the "What smells strongest in the nursery?" contest. It has quite a history. Read all about it at London's Royal Botanic Gardens website. 

Details

Product rating
 
(1 reviews)  

In stock
5 item(s) available

Common name  
Caymen Island Sage
USDA Zones  
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)  
18"/18"/18"
Exposure  
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type  
Well drained & rich
Water needs  
Water loving
Pot size  
3 1/2" deep pot
Container plant?  
Yes
Our price
11.50

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Quantity (5 available)

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full shade
Full shade
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Fragrant
Fragrant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11
18 inches tall
18 inches tall
18 inches wide
18 inches wide
Ground cover
Ground cover
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Water loving
Water loving

Blooming Season

Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant

Colors

Salvias and their companion plants pop with color. Sweep your eyes from top to the bottom here for an impression of this plant's color combinations. The first row displays blossoms from primary to less dominant shades and includes any contrasting throat color. The second tier is the main hue of leaf-like bracts or calyxes supporting the flowers. Foliage (one or two colors) leafs out in the bottom row.
Primary color - Brilliant Purplish Blue
RHS# 97A



Secondary color - Yellowish white
RHS# 155D






Throat color - Yellowish white - RHS# 155D




Tertiary color - Brilliant Purplish Blue
RHS# 96D



Bract color - Dark Red
RHS# 187A

Leaf color - Moderate Yellowish Green
RHS# 137D



Learn more about how we analyze plant colors
Ready for some pruning?

Evergreen, woody Salvias

These are species that grow as woody shrubs and keep their foliage year round.

Pruning is both an art and a science. It takes practice, experience and learning from your mistakes to become a proficient pruner. The pruning information about this plant should be considered as a guideline for getting started. Your particular climate, soils, watering and fertility schedules, sun exposure, space requirements and weather are all factors that influence how and when you choose to prune. We’re providing a starting place for you, and over time you will learn the particularities of this plant in your garden. Don’t be afraid to get started – Salvias, in general, are quick to rebound if inappropriately pruned.

Deadheading – the removal of spent flowers, is a practice that will always benefit the plant’s health and appearance. This can be done at any time. Pruning involves removal of entire stems of spent growth. Becoming "spent" means that flowering stems stop blooming and begin going to seed.

Growing Season Pruning

At any time, you can perform cosmetic pruning -- shaping, controlling height and width and removing the oldest wood. Some gardeners periodically remove the oldest stems to encourage fresh new growth.


Dormant Season Pruning

Same as Growing Season.


Check the Views from the Garden section of our Everything Salvias Blog for videos that apply to this plant.

  • Salvia tuerckheimii

    (Dominican Sage)  From high elevations in the mountains of the Dominican Republic, this beautiful Sage is rare and unique.  The large, bold, deep green leathery leaves are a perfect backdrop to delicate orange flowers.  The fist to overegrown zucchini sized inflorescens is apple green with red highlights, with the flowers emerging over a long period.  In or out of bloom this is a distinctive and most attractive plant.

    Dominican Sage grows into a large evergreen shrub.  Since it is winter blooming and tender, it is most suitable for the frost free southern states.  Tolerant of almost any well drained soil, it thrives in rich soil with adequate water.

    We are happy to offfer this stunner for the first time in 2017.

    14.50
    New!
  • Salvia koyamae

    (Shinano-akigiri) Japan's largest island, Honshu, is home to Salvia koyamae, a shade- and moisture-loving herbaceous perennial. It is notable for arrow-shaped foliage and translucent, yellow flowers blooming from late summer into fall.

    Large and lush, the yellow-green hairy leaves of this sage form loose, gently spreading clumps. Although it can tolerate some morning sun, this is a shade-loving sage. It is a hardy choice for shady groundcovers, borders, containers, woodland settings and moist areas.

    An underused gem of a plant, Salvia koyamae and presents the added bonus of being disagreeable to deer. Highly recommended.

    10.50
  • Salvia amarissima

    (Bitter Mexican Sage) Hummingbirds love this heat-tolerant Salvia, which is one of our best choices for shady, moist areas. The large-lipped, baby-blue flowers with white striations bloom from late summer through fall.

    This compact shrub grows well in the garden or in a container, especially where it will receive morning sun and afternoon shade or partial shade all day. In its native Mexico, it is used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments. We love its grace and beauty in the garden!

    Highly recommended.

    10.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x 'Big Swing'

    (Big Swing Sage) With its large, cobalt blue flowers displayed on strong, wiry, branched stems, this eye-catching sage wins the FBTS "best of class" designation for being our top Big Leaf Sage (Salvia macrophylla).

    Garden writer Betsy Clebsch developed Big Swing, which is a cross between Big Leaf Sage and Arrowleaf Sage (S. sagitata). Its flower spikes rise well above handsome foliage with large, furry, arrowhead-shaped leaves that look almost tropical.

    Use this heat-tolerant plant to bring a lush look to a damp corner of your garden or in mixed patio containers.  Give it rich, well-drained soil and plenty of water for a long bloom season.

    Big Swing comes highly recommended by butterflies, but deer leave it alone.

    10.50
Average customer rating:
 
(1 reviews)  



1 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Ms. Robin Hoselton
Jun 3, 2017
Having recently received Cayman, I haven't yet seen it in bloom but am delighted to give a home to a plant that was on the brink of extinction. Since it may be short-lived, I'll keep it in a pot and try leaf cuttings in the winter. I like this company for the packing care of its plants, but also appreciate the frank, detailed descriptions.
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Salvias Down South: 15 Thirsty Salvias for Florida

Salvias Down South: 15 Thirsty Salvias for Florida


Category: Salvias Down South
Posted: Jan 21, 2013 11:08 AM
Synopsis: Flowers by the Sea grows Salvias that are already popular in the Southeast as well as others we would like to introduce to gardeners seeking thirsty flowering plants that can also adjust to dry spells. Many are fine choices for Florida hummingbird gardens. Our suggestions are organized into categories based on moisture tolerance – average and ample -- as well as sun requirements.
The Power of Scent

The Power of Scent


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Aug 30, 2012 09:15 PM
Synopsis: While it's true that not all Salvias smell, well, pleasant, many varieties are grown specifically for the pungent or even sweet aromas that they release into the air. These ten Salvias are our top picks for the best-smelling varieties in the garden.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.