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Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'


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Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'
Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.

Limited Availability Plant
Limited Availability

Available March to June only.

Learn more
Best of Class
Best of Class
We believe this to be the best red flowering Tropical Sage.

Description

(Forest Fire Tropical Sage) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the abundant, fire engine red flowers of this mostly annual sage. It's a popular cultivar of one of the first Salvias used for ornamental purposes -- Tropical Sage. The flowers are dramatically framed by reddish black bracts.

A tender perennial in mild climates, this compact plant belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. Thomas Jefferson grew this drought-resistant, low-maintenance sage. Today, it is a favorite in borders and containers.

Plant this long blooming, spectacularly showy sage in full sun or partial shade wherever you need a big splash of color. Give it regular watering and rich soil.

Details

Product rating
 
(3 reviews)  

In stock
Limited Availability

Common name
Forest Fire Tropical Sage
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
24"/24"/36"
Exposure
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type
Rich
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes!
Our price
$4.50
Quantity Price ()
6+ Items $4.00
*Note:

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Heat tolerant
Heat tolerant
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11
24 inches tall
24 inches tall
24 inches wide
24 inches wide

Water Needs

Average water
Average water

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Spring blooming
Spring blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Butterflies
Butterflies
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Impatiens niamniamensis ‘African Queen’

    (Congo Cockatoo) Busy Lizzie this is not! Vivid candy-corn colors and nectar spurs arched similar to cockatoo beaks make Impatiens niamniamensis 'African Queen' an unusual sight.

    Except for its glossy, deep green, veined leaves, you might not identify this unusual plant as being related to the flat-petaled Impatiens walleriana that began taking over the shade in home gardens beginning in the 1950s. Congo Cockatoo comes from the flashier side of the family.

    This tall Impatiens has dark succulent stems. As the stems darken and thicken over time, it begins to look like a tiny tree.

    Congo Cockatoo was first collected in South Sudan where the Niam-Niam tribe live and once practiced cannibalism. It's one of about 1,000 Impatiens species and is native to a broad swath of Central Africa from Kenya west to Cameroon. In the U.S., it grows best as a houseplant or in patio containers in warm-winter areas.

    Similar to many members of its genus, this is a long-blooming plant. It tolerates heat, but needs lots of water as well as partial to full shade. For in-ground planting, this is one to consider if you live in a hot, humid area and have damp shady spots in your yard.

    $8.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia adenophora

    (Oaxaca Red Sage) This rare sage has small, furry, bright orange-red flowers in abundance. It grows nicely in containers or, in mild climates, can become a large shrub in the ground. Attractive, bright green foliage and winter-to-summer blooming make it a desirable choice.

    It may not be scientific, but the best way to describe this plant is "cute."  Buds that look like little balloons ready to burst are followed by furry, tubular flowers. This water-loving Salvia does best in partial shade. Even though Oaxaca Red is a tender perennial, it's well worth the effort to grow this gem.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia amarissima

    (Bitter Mexican Sage) Hummingbirds love this heat-tolerant Salvia, which is one of our best choices for shady, moist areas. The large-lipped, baby-blue flowers with white striations bloom from late summer through fall.

    This compact shrub grows well in the garden or in a container, especially where it will receive morning sun and afternoon shade or partial shade all day. In its native Mexico, it is used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments. We love its grace and beauty in the garden!

    Highly recommended.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia coccinea 'Snow Nymph'

    (Snow Nymph White Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this award winner, which is an outstanding choice for pure white color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    Snow Nymph is easy to grow and a great addition to annual flower beds or containers. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. Plant it in full sun or partial shade as a tender perennial in mild climates and as an annual elsewhere. Reaching up to 36 inches tall and 24 inches wide, this sage is an ideal border plant. Use it where you want to create intense color and attract pollinators.

    This sage belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. We consider it indispensable due to its long bloom, low maintenance and spectacular show, especially mixed with the bright red 'Summer Jewel Red'.

    $5.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Pink'

    (Summer Jewel Pink Tropical Sage) Butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees enjoy this Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner, which is an outstanding choice for bright pink & white color from June to autumn. This type of Tropical Sage is generally the first to flower for us.

    Summer Jewel is easy to grow and a great addition to annual flower beds or containers. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and regular watering. Plant it in full sun or partial shade as a tender perennial in mild climates and as an annual elsewhere. Reaching up to 36 inches tall and 24 inches wide, this sage is an ideal border plant. Use it where you want to create intense color and attract pollinators.

    One of our Top 10 Hummingbird Plants, this sage belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. We consider it indispensable due to its long bloom, low maintenance and spectacular show.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia miniata

    (Misty Mountain Sage or Belize Sage) Salvia miniata combines luminous reddish-orange flowers and glossy, myrtle-green leaves that are different from any sage foliage we know.

    In its native habitat of Southern Mexico and Belize, this lush perennial grows at low elevations on shady, moist mountain slopes.

    Bloom time is summer into fall in USDA Zones 9 to 11. On the Northern California coast where we grow Salvia miniata, it sometimes flowers from June through October. In Southern Florida, the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden has recorded continuous flowering for as long as 30 months.

    This is such a pretty plant that it is worth growing as an annual in areas where winters are chillier, but warmth and moisture are ample from spring to fall. It has few equals as an attention-grabbing container plant and works well in perennial borders or edging pathways. It even grows well as a houseplant in a sunny, eastern-facing window.

    Salvia minata can grow well in full sun if it receives plenty of water. However, it particularly does well in partial shade or in locations where there is morning sun and afternoon shade. Give it fertile, well-drained soil. Grow it, and you can expect visits from hummingbirds and butterflies.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia rubescens

    (Venezuelan Red Sage) Purple stems and calyxes so dark that they almost look black contrast dramatically with the deep red-orange flowers of this South American beauty. This tall, spectacular sage has been in cultivation for decades but is still rare in gardens. We'd like to see that change.

    The heavily textured leaves are large, growing about 4 inches long and 3 inches wide. They are hairy, which gives the foliage a silvery appearance. The flower spikes grow up to 2 feet tall.

    This is a robust shrub that requires full sun to partial shade, average watering and rich, well-drained soil. Plant it in a prominent place so you can enjoy its long bloom throughout fall as well as the hummingbirds who use it regularly.  At our farm its flowering synchronizes with the Dahlias. Garden uses include shrub borders, cut-flower gardens, background plantings and patio containers.

    Rubescens refers to the reddish color of the flowers. This native of Venezuela was first described by Reinhard Gustav Paul Kunth in 1817.

    Although we list this species for USDA Cold Hardiness Zones 9 to 11, we believe it may be hardy to Zone 8 winters if treated as an herbaceous perennial and well mulched.

    Highly recommended.

    $8.50
  • Salvia splendens van houttei 'Dancing Flame'

    (Variegated Scarlet Sage) Crimson flowers topping bright yellow foliage mottled with deep green make this one of the most spectacular Salvias we grow. There are numerous clones of this variety of the tender perennial throughout the U.S. nursery trade, but we consider ours to be the best, as it originated in our nursery.

    Meet its needs and Salvia splendens van houttei 'Dancing Flame' is easy to grow. Plant it in partial to full shade where you can give it rich, well-drained soil and regular watering.

    Although short and compact, this Scarlet Sage is dramatic in woodland gardens and annual flowerbeds as well as in patio containers and indoors as a houseplant. Outdoors, it is an annual in colder zones and a tender perennial in warmer ones where it can bloom 12 months a year.

    Seasonally available and limited.

    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia splendens ‘Lighthouse Red'

    (Lighthouse Red Scarlet Sage) This Scarlet Sage is raring to bloom and often begins flowering when less than 6 inches tall. That is a major reason why it is the only one of the many truly red varieties of this species that we grow.

    Here are more reasons for our choice: Lighthouse Red never stops blooming all season and is tough enough to grow in severe Texas heat, torrential Florida rainstorms and California humidity. Also, the tall clusters of large crimson flowers do remind us of a lighthouse --something you can see from a great distance.

    Lighthouse Red is a tender perennial that may return yearly to the warmest parts of its range, which encompasses USDA Zones 9 to 11. Aim for success by providing partial shade, rich soil and ample water for this Brazilian native. However, this variety is more tolerant than most. A combination of morning sun and afternoon shade works well, but it can also flourish in full shade.

    Grow this dramatic variety in a container or mass it for a spectacular color statement. We highly recommend it and so do hummingbirds.

    $6.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia texana

    (Texas Blue Sage) This is a cutie and a tough customer once established. It even grows well in caliche soils. Although Salvia texana typically blooms only during spring in Texas, it has a longer season stretching into fall up north.

    Flower colors are in the blue range and include purple and violet. Our strain could be described as having the violet of Scarlet O’Hara eyes as well as pronounced white beelines. Its deep green, oblong leaves and bracts are covered with silky hairs so long that they look like eyelashes.

    Although short at 12 to 24 inches tall, Texas Blue Sage is so charming that we like to crouch down to get a closer look. In Northern California, it thrives in full sun, but in Texas, it appreciates a bit of shade on the hottest days. This drought resistant Texas perennial does well in a dry garden, but also accepts regular watering in well drained soils.

    It can be temperamental outside its native range, so please take special care with this species.  Not a good plant for moist or humid parts of he country.

    Grow it as a groundcover or in borders, native plant gardens and prairie-type landscapes. We agree with the butterflies, hummingbirds and honeybees that visit this beauty: What’s not to love about it.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia urica

    (Blue Bush Sage) Furry, large and heavily textured, the mid-green leaves of Salvia urica contrast attractively with its violet-blue flowers that bloom spring into summer.

    Blue Bush Sage is a sub-shrub with woody stems as well as soft, herbaceous growth. It is native to moist, mountainous jungles in Chiapas, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras where it grows at altitudes from 1,000 to 8,500 feet. So it appreciates partial shade and moisture.

    Plant this dramatic hummingbird sage in a container. Or add it to a shrubby border in a woodland garden. It grows quickly, and starts blooming early in the season. In areas with colder winters than those of USDA Zone 9, it is an excellent annual.

    Highly recommended.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x 'Big Swing'

    (Big Swing Sage) With its large, cobalt blue flowers displayed on strong, wiry, branched stems, this eye-catching sage wins the FBTS "best of class" designation for being our top Big Leaf Sage (Salvia macrophylla).

    Garden writer Betsy Clebsch developed Big Swing, which is a cross between Big Leaf Sage and Arrowleaf Sage (S. sagitata). Its flower spikes rise well above handsome foliage with large, furry, arrowhead-shaped leaves that look almost tropical.

    Use this heat-tolerant plant to bring a lush look to a damp corner of your garden or in mixed patio containers.  Give it rich, well-drained soil and plenty of water for a long bloom season.

    Big Swing comes highly recommended by butterflies, but deer leave it alone.

    $8.50
  • Hippeastrum 'Elk Orange'

    (Elk Orange Amaryllis) This is a Flowers by the Sea hybrid that we bred from Hippeastrum blossfeldiae and complex, modern hybrids. It is a hardy Amaryllis meant for life outdoors as well as indoors among houseplants.

    Unlike the tall, showy Amaryllis plants grown indoors during winter, this isn't a variety that fades away with the holidays. Its bulbs multiply, produce lots of green, strappy foliage and send up petite flower spikes with large, spicy orange, trumpet flowers that bloom over more than one season.

    You can grow Elk Orange as an evergreen in the warmest USDA zones and as an annual or houseplant in chilly winter areas. Whether in ground or in a container, hardy Amaryllis need to be divided and replanted once they become crowded. It's well worth the effort for these exquisite flowers.

    Hippeastrums are native to South America. This one needs average watering based on local conditions as well as rich, well-drained soil. Indoors, place it in a sunny window. Outdoors, it does well in locations ranging from partial shade to full sun.

    $9.00
Average customer rating:
 
(3 reviews)  



3 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Mr. patricia small
Jul 17, 2014
never received this plant !
All other plants beautiful.
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Mrs. Penny Durnin
Jun 6, 2014
Great annual salvia. Grows quickly and blooms early to provide nectar for hummers before some of the larger salvias come into bloom. It is a little more compact than Lady in Red so it makes a nice border plant. Salvia coccineas are a staple in my Hummingbird Garden.
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Marilyn from KY (zone 6a)
Apr 9, 2014
This is a great Hummingbird attracting Salvia and I love it!

I grow it in a container and although it's reseeded, I always get another one from FBTS.

I always get a plant for my parents and they love this coccinea Salvia. They tell me that they get lots of Hummers visiting the flowers and get so excited seeing the Hummers.

A bright, easy and long blooming Salvia.

Thanks FBTS for always offering it!
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Category: Portraits in Gardening
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Synopsis:

Planting a hummingbird garden filled with nectar-rich, long-blooming Salvias aids preservation of hummingbird species that migrate each year throughout North America. It also gives you a front-row seat to a fascinating aerobatics show. Backyard islands of colorful sages are like gas stations for hummingbirds' long-distance journeys. Salvias can keep your garden whirring with the helicopter-like flight of hummingbirds from spring through autumn and -- in warm climates -- into winter.

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I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Fragrance as well as color attracts butterflies. However, they don't have noses. Instead, butterflies smell and taste with their antennas and feet. Here are some ways to attract them:


  1. Plant sages with platform-type blossoms. Unlike hummingbirds, butterflies can't hover while feeding. Sages with large lower lips and short nectar tubes, such as those in the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) and Mountain Sage (S. microphylla) group, give butterflies a place to stand while gathering nectar and pollen.
  2. Provide lots of color and sunlight. Butterflies need to stay warm and are attracted to a broad range of flower colors.
  3. Include native species. Insects and plants have co-evolved to meet each other's needs within their native regions. Butterflies prefer feeding on their local, native perennials and shrubs.
  4. Grow Caterpillar Host Plants. Butterflies need baby nurseries. Some are extremely picky about the plants on which they lay eggs, such as Monarchs, which need milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). The North American Butterfly Association is a good source of information about host plants.
  5. Don't use pesticides. They kill many beneficial insects, including butterflies.
  6. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based on bloom times as well as color and shape. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons.
  7. Provide puddles. Butterflies stay hydrated by splashing in puddles located in sunny spots on the ground or raised up in shallow birdbaths. Include rocks for basking; butterflies need to dry and warm their wings.
  8. Plant butterfly gardens near shelter. Butterflies need to be able to flee into trees, shrubbery and woodpiles when predators appear and when windy or rainy weather occurs.
  9. Supplement plantings with rotten fruit. Some butterflies love the juice of rotting fruit even more than nectar.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about butterflies.