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Salvia dominica


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Salvia dominica

Limited Availability Plant
Limited Availability

Available May to July only.

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Description

(Dominican Sage) Native to Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria, this candelabra-shaped, perennial sage may have inspired the design of the menorah, (Exodus 37:17). It is a tough, drought-resistant plant with silver-haired foliage and bright white flowers that seem to blaze.

The specific epitaph dominica means "belonging to the Lord."  This medicinal sage has a heavenly fragrance and is used in perfumery, cosmetics and the production of a rare essential oil. Plant it in full sun as a compact border or in a dry garden. It makes a fine groundcover.

Dominican Sage thrives in poor yet well-drained soil and doesn't require much water.  We have found it to be durable, but it does not tolerate wet, cold winters.  However, the fragrance of this plant on a warm day makes it worth growing as an annual.

Details

Product rating
 
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In stock
10 item(s) available

Common name
Dominican Sage
USDA Zones
8 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
36"/36"/36"
Exposure
Full sun
Soil type
Well drained
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Our price
$7.50

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Quantity (10 available)

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Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.
  • Origanum x 'Norton Gold'

    Although used in cooking, this mild tasting oregano is particularly ornamental. Its gold-green leaves turn bright gold in autumn adding a glow to herb gardens, borders and container plantings. In summer, it shoots up 20-inch-tall spikes of pink flowers.

    Norton’s Gold is a hybrid, but the species is native to Greece and Turkey. This short variety rises up 3 to 6 inches and spreads 24 inches or more. So it works well as a fragrant, drought-resistant groundcover. It's also cold tolerant and grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9.

    Give this perennial partial to full shade or a combination of morning sun and afternoon shade. Any soil will do as long as it is well drained. Regular watering is fine, but as with so many herbs, Norton’s Gold Oregano thrives in dry conditions.

    Historically, oreganos have been used as in herbal remedies for problems including respiratory difficulties, heartburn and urinary tract afflictions. Oregano oil also is used in insect repellant; in the garden, oregano plants deter many garden pests while attracting honeybees and butterflies. You might say they are golden.

    $7.00
  • Salvia barrelieri

    (North African Sage) This stunning herbaceous perennial has sky blue flowers on showy, branched spikes that grow up to 6 feet tall.

    Native to North Africa and Southwest Spain, it is semi-deciduous. North African Sage appears compact until blooming from summer through fall.  It's a surprising, spectacular addition to any perennial border. Plant it early for best bloom. After flowering time, you can cut it back to a low mound. We highly recommend this FBTS favorite.

    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia cedrosensis

    (Cedros Island Sage) From the Island of Cedars off the coast of Baja California Sur comes this delightful xeric sage with deep violet-blue flowers and silvery foliage. The square-shaped, 1-inch-long leaves are densely covered with short white hairs providing moisture retention and a velvety texture.

    This is a gem for xeric, full-sun gardens. It is easy to grow if you understand the conditions on Cedros Island, which are dry, hot and generally sunny. In their mountain-forest ecosystem, the minimal water that these plants receive is largely from occasional fog. So keep this plant mostly dry, give it perfect drainage and don't shade it if possible. Your reward will be a lovely edging plant, small-scale ground cover or a short but dramatic container plant.

    This Salvia is rare to find in cultivation; we are very happy to be able to supply this lovely plant.
    $9.50
  • Salvia cleistogama

    (Closed Sage) Yellow flowers are rare among Salvias. So this elegant European sage is greatly appreciated. It is an herbaceous, summer-flowering perennial that has become naturalized in eight states in the U.S. The common name refers to its flowers self-pollinating before opening.

    Closed Sage is an introduced species in Alabama, California, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia where it survives cold winter zones as well as ones with mild weather.

    Although it requires well-drained soil, this drought-resistant sage is a candidate for less-than-perfect growing conditions. It thrives on neglect and full sun. Use this adaptable sage in wild parts of the yard where it will attract honeybees and hummingbirds. It also adds a wildflower touch to border plantings.

    The nomenclature of the species is confusing. S. cleistogama seems to be the proper name for what was previously S. verbenacea. We think it is a different plant. In fact, one grower calls it the "Mystery Sage."

    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia coahuilensis

    (Coahuila Sage) Such a pretty little shrub! Its beet-purple flowers will amaze you from June until autumn frost. Coahuilla Sage is an ideal ground cover or sunny border plant at 24 inches tall and wide. Small, shiny, deep green leaves clothe this densely branched, mounding sage.

    This beauty comes from the mountains of Coahuilla, Mexico. Aside from full sun, a little watering and well-drained soil, it is undemanding. We find it to be most attractive when kept on the lean side. A gentle shearing after blooming keeps it tidy and tight.

    Similar in many ways to Salvia greggii (Autumn Sage), this plant has smaller leaves with a distinct spicy aroma. Coahuilla Sage is generally smaller and has a more intense flower color that S. greggii's just dream of. Obviously, we highly recommend it.

    $7.50
  • Salvia disermas

    (Transvaal Sage) Growing in partially shaded stream beds and rocky grasslands, this herbaceous perennial from South Africa is showy yet tough as a ground cover or perennial border plant. Its spikes of large, pinkish white flowers bloom from spring through fall.

    The lush, lance-shaped, pebbly foliage is a cool gray-green. A compact plant, Transvaal Sage fits well in wild gardens and formal borders.  Combine this plant with Carex comans 'Amazon Mist' for an eye-catching display. This drought-resistant perennial is attractive to butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    According to PlantZAfrica.com, the fragrant leaves are used sparingly in a tea intended to energize the body after illness, decrease fever and reduce heartburn. The website also notes that the leaves are used in a lotion applied to 'skin rashes, stings, bites, pimples, infected scrapes, scratches and sores.'
    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia disermas alba

    (White Transvaal Sage) This is the white-flowered form of the herbaceous perennial Transvaal Sage. It grows in partially shaded stream beds and rocky grasslands and is tough yet showy with spikes of large white, pink-tinged flowers from spring to fall. It is a good ground cover or perennial border plant.

    The lush, lance-shaped, pebbly foliage is a cool gray-green. A compact plant, White Transvaal Sage fits well in wild gardens and formal borders. Combine this plant with pink form of Transvaal Sage for an-eye catching display. This drought-resistant perennial is attractive to butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds.

    According to PlantZAfrica.com, the fragrant leaves are used sparingly in a tea intended to energize the body after illness, decrease fever and reduce heartburn. The website also notes that the leaves are used in a lotion applied to 'skin rashes, stings, bites, pimples, infected scrapes, scratches and sores.'
    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia forsskaolii

    (Balkan Sage) Violet-blue whorls of flowers and plentiful, fuzzy, basal leaves that reach an impressive length of 18 inches are two notable features about this hardy, herbaceous perennial, which is native to the Southeastern Balkan Peninsula.

    Balkan Sage is found in coniferous forests, meadows and slopes from Bulgaria to Turkey's Black Sea coast. However, it is named after the 19th century Finnish plant collector Peter Forsskål, who collected botanical samples further south in Saudi Arabia.

    Although deciduous in areas with cold winters, it blooms about nine months a year for us on the Northern California coast beginning in summer. Following a brief winter dormancy, it returns reliably every spring, clumping in a way that makes it look like Hosta from a distance. Yet, unlike that woodland plant, it grows well in full sun as well partial shade. It is a fine choice for a lightly shaded garden or border and is happy in the acid soil under conifers.

    Give it soil with average fertility, occasional water and enough shade to promote lush growth. Your reward will be large flowers with lovely white and yellow bee lines attractive to hummingbirds and honeybees.

    $7.50
  • Salvia fruticosa

    (Greek Sage) Most of the dried culinary sage sold in the United States is Greek Sage. Frescoes on the island of Crete, dating to 1400 BC, depict this plant used by the Phoenicians and Greeks for cooking and medicine. It is an ancient and beloved friend of mankind.

    In the garden, Greek Sage provides a pleasant lavender fragrance, especially on warm days, and has spikes of pink-to-lavender flowers. Similar to most culinary sages, it loves full sun and well-drained soil. However, it tolerates moist ground. This compact plant, which grows 24 inches tall and 18 inches wide, is a good choice for fragrant borders and patio containers as well as kitchen gardens.

    Grow this drought-resistant, heat-tolerant plant in well-drained soil that is on the dry side.  Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds will thank you with frequent visits.

    Although some cooks find Salvia oficinalis culinary sages tastier, Salvia fruticosa is easier to grow. It comprises 50 to 95% of the commercial market. We think it offers an interesting change of taste.
    $7.50
  • Salvia hians

    (Himalayan Sage or Kashmir Sage) The word "hians" in Salvia hians means "gaping" and refers to the hanging lip of this sage's flowers, which are a dusky violet and bloom from late spring through early fall.

    This hardy, easy-to-grow species is a heat-tolerant native of Pakistan and Bhutan where it is found at elevations of 8,000 to 13,000 ft. Sticky and fragrant, the foliage features heart-shaped leaves.

    Himalayan Sage grows in woodlands and on slopes in its native environment. Give it sun in cool climates and part shade in warm areas. This water-loving, herbaceous sage also needs soil rich in humus.

    Himalayan Sage is a good border plant for shady walkways. Although deer don't like it, our customers do. Consequently, it is usually in short supply.

    $9.50
  • Salvia keerli

    (Big Grape Sage) This lavender-flowered native of Northern Mexico resembles Salvia melissodora (Grape Scented Sage), but is bigger and also has larger leaves and flowers. It's a great companion plant for its little brother, which shares the same cultural needs and affinity for Zones 8 to 10. Both bloom from summer into fall.

    Similar to Salvia melissodora, this sage is used by the indigenous Tarahumara people of Chihuahua, Mexico, as a medicinal herb. Another commonality is that the flowers smell like ripe grapes, a fact that young children enjoy confirming. In addition to the fragrance of its flowers, Big Grape Sage has appealing leaves with furry, white undersides.

    Give this heat-tolerant Salvia a sunny, warm spot in well-drained soil. Then watch it grow without fuss. Although drought tolerant, it enjoys regular watering. Big Grape Sage is a good choice as a mid-height groundcover or in shrubby and herbaceous perennial borders.

    Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds highly recommend this sage, but deer avoid it.
    $9.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia kellermanii

    (Kellerman's Sage) Rare in the United States, this wooly leafed, upright shrub comes from Southern Mexico and Guatemala. Mid-size, powder-blue flowers bloom on its long, airy stems from summer through winter in mild climates. It's lovely in mixed, drought-resistant plantings.

    Named for American botanist William A. Kellerman, who began exploring Guatemala in 1904, this shrubby, medium-height sage stands up well to heat and may be more cold hardy than Zone 9. It has been confused with Salvia collinsii, which is much taller, less airy and has white/lavender blossoms.

    Butterflies and hummingbirds enjoy Kellerman's Sage, which is adaptable to either full sun or partial shade. It isn't picky about type of soil, but does need good drainage. Plant it in a container or as a shrubby border.
    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia nilotica

    (Highland African Sage) Also known as Nile Sage, this drought-resistant Salvia is native to a wide swath of the African highlands, from Ethiopia to Zimbabwe where it is has long been used medicinally.

    In the West, Salvia nilotica is the subject of medical studies concerning the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory traits of the essential oils in its foliage.

    This vigorous perennial, which thrives at elevations up to 12,000 feet, doesn't need much care or water. Although the cloud-like spikes of tiny, lavender flowers aren't numerous, they are pleasantly scented and bloom from summer into fall. 

    This heat-tolerant, drought-resistant sage works well in dry gardens and perennial borders. It forms a tidy, gently spreading mound that makes an effective groundcover in full sun. Salvia nilotica is cold hardy from USDA Zones 8 to 10.


    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia officinalis 'Berggarten'

    (Mountain Culinary Sage) Elliptical, silvery green leaves covered with downy hairs make this one of the prettiest types of Salvia officinalis. Berggarten is a German variety widely grown for its culinary value and attractive, tightly mounded form.

    Berggarten is powerfully flavorful, but not bitter. Every kitchen garden needs it for myriad uses in meat, vegetable and pasta dishes. It is delicious in sage pesto or sauteed whole leaf and served atop pasta tossed with olive oil and garlic.

    Aside from average, well-drained garden soil, full sun and a little bit of watering, this drought-resistant, heat-tolerant sage is not fussy. At 18 to 24 inches tall, it is just the right size for a fragrant groundcover in a dry garden. Spreading only 12 inches wide, it works well in a mixed container planting. Berggarten is a perennial in USDA Zones 6 to 9 and can even be grown as a houseplant.

    On the rare occasions that it flowers in summer, Berggarten sends up spikes of lavender flowers. Honeybees buzz to it when it does bloom.

    The species Salvia officinalis has a long history of use as a folk remedy. It has been valued for centuries as a digestive aid.
    $7.50
  • Salvia pomifera

    (Fruit Sage) Also known as Apple Sage, this is an extremely drought-resistant plant. Its common names come from the small round fruit-like galls that an insect creates on its branches on the island of Crete where it is native to dry slopes.

    The galls develop when a small gallfly, also called a gall wasp, invades the sage's branches -- something that also happens to Salvia fruticosa in its Grecian homeland. Some people eat these tart-flavored galls raw and others use them to create a sweet conserve. Herbalists also use the leaves as a folk remedy, such as in tea.

    However, in USDA Zones 8 to 10, this fragrant, heat-tolerant sage is simply an elegant shrub that must be grown in dry soil.  Excess water during the growing season leads to a rapid demise.  Salvia pomifera thrives in full sun, even in dry clay soils. Yet it prefers ground that drains well.

    From summer into fall, its pale white-to-lavender flowers attract honeybees and butterflies to dry gardens. Use it as a groundcover on a slope, as part of a shrub border or an edging for sunny pathways.

    This sage is not common in the United States. We are very happy to be able to recommend it to gardeners in hot, arid regions.
    $7.50
  • Salvia repens

    (Kruipsalie) A creeping growth pattern is what gives this fine, long-blooming sage its scientific appellation "repens." The flower colors of this species include white, mauve and blues. Our selection looks like a pale purple cloud in our garden.

    The plant's handsome, bright foliage is rough and hairy with irregularly toothed leaf margins. Its foliage, short height of 12 to 24 inches and rhizomatous root system make it a fine groundcover or path edging. It also looks pretty in containers.

    Kruipsalie is the Afrikaans common name of this South African native that comes from from the Eastern Cape. "Salie" refers to the Salvia genus of which there are 26 native species in South Africa.

    Although it is often described as blooming summer into fall, our Kruipsalie flowers 10 months a year on the Northern California coast. It grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11. It is drought tolerant, but responds to regular watering with lush growth. Give it full sun and well-drained soil enriched with compost.

    Salvia repens is among the South African Salvias regularly researched for its medicinal and pesticidal properties. In its homeland, it has a plethora of medicinal uses including soothing digestive problems, treating sores and disinfecting homes.

    $7.50
  • Salvia sclarea

    (Clary or Clear Eye Sage or Eyebright) Pink-purple bracts and violet-purple flowers form a pastel cloud over the large, rumpled leaves of Clary Sage in summer. It is a towering beauty growing up to 5 feet tall. Sacred to some due to age-old use in herbal remedies, it is heavenly to look at.

    Depending on the nose of the gardener, its fragrance is either equally heavenly or hellishly rank like dirty socks. Personally, we enjoy Clary's musky aroma.

    Native to the Mediterranean, Clary loves full sun and works well in dry gardens as a background planting. It's also a good choice for a kitchen garden, because it also has a long history of culinary use. If you enjoy its fragrance, it is a fine choice for borders, cut flower gardens and containers.

    Clary is a biennial that blooms and dies the second year after it is planted. If you can tolerate snipping the lovely flower stalks before they wither, you can increase the plant's bloom. It reseeds, which means that you can expect new plants even though it isn't a perennial. Butterflies and honeybees love it, but deer leave it alone.

    $6.00
  • Salvia sclarea var turkestanica 'Piemont'

    (Italian Clary Sage) Clary Sages are well known for their use in folk remedies, aromatherapy and cosmetics. Glowing purple bracts frame the spectacular white blooms of this cultivar on 5-foot-tall spikes. It is a delight for honeybees and butterflies.

    The foot-long hairy leaves of this rosette-forming herbaceous perennial are striking for their symmetry and dark petioles.

    Flowering begins in early summer; if you remove the spent spikes, bloom time continues until close to fall.  Use Italian Clary Sage in perennial borders and background plantings.

    The key to long-term success with this ancient species is to never allow seed to form. Pruning the spikes is a difficult choice, because the bracts are so showy. However, failure to do so results in a short -lived plant. The cut stems look pretty in flower arrangements.

    Give this plant full sun and well-drained soil. Although it is drought resistant and works well in dry gardens, this sage responds well to average watering based on local conditions.

    Clary Sage is native to Europe. It was one of the first Salvias described by the Ancient Greeks, who used it medicinally to make eye washes and other remedies. Although some gardeners disagree, our noses know that this plant's heady aroma is a blessing in the garden.

    We highly recommend this plant as the best variety of its species.

    $7.00
  • Salvia staminea

    (Iranian Sage) Mixed in with short perennials that bloom over a wide range of seasons, Salvia staminea makes an attractive contribution to short borders during its summer bloom time. Our strain has dark bracts surrounding pastel white-to-blue-to-lavender flowers. The dark green, branching foliage has oblong to oval-shaped leaves.

    This high-altitude sage from Western Asia is commonly called Iranian Sage. It likes regular to light watering and adapts to almost any well-drained soil. Heat tolerant and drought resistant, it grows well in USDA zones 7 to 11. In addition to borders, this petite sage looks pretty as edging on a sunny pathway where its delicate-looking blossoms can be viewed up close.

    As its botanical name indicates, the flowers of Salvia staminea have pronounced stamens, which project from the upper lip of their blossoms. Put a little imagination to work, and they look a bit like forked serpent tongues, only pale pink.

    Similar to many Salvias, this one is the focus of medical research. In particular, studies have concerned its phytochemicals, such as Taxodone, that appear to fight cancer and have antibacterial, antioxidant, antifungal and insecticidal properties. We just focus on how pretty and resilient it is in the garden.
    $7.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia taraxacifolia

    (Dandelion Leaf Sage) Brush or bruise the basal foliage of this Moroccan Salvia and it exudes a citrusy fragrance. Petite and heat tolerant, this is a sturdy, adaptable groundcover.

    The late James C. Archibald of the Scottish Rock and Garden Club once described the plant's homeland -- the Atlas Mountains of Morocco -- as being "high, barren" and "snow-streaked." He collected specimens there in 1962 and noted that the plant retains its dwarf-like height better in dry, poor, gravelly soil.

    Taraxacifolia refers to the dandelion-like appearance of the plant's foliage. However, this is a non-invasive sage. Forming tight, low rosettes that spread gently, the gray-green, lyre-shaped leaves are heavily indented. The foot-tall spikes of large, soft, pink flowers bloom from summer into fall. 

    This perennial withstands light foot traffic, which is useful in a groundcover. Heat resistant and drought tolerant, it thrives in full sun and dry gardens with well-drained soil. However, it can also handle average watering based on local conditions. Dandelion Leaf Sage grows well in USDA Zones 7 to 11 where it is evergreen down to 20 degrees F and hardy to 10 degrees F if winter mulched.

    We like this easy-to-grow, uncommon sage and are glad that deer do not.
    $7.50
  • Salvia tingitana

    (Mauretania Tingitana Sage) Native to Saudi Arabia, this sage has a long history of cultivation going back 400 years and weaving throughout various countries in the Middle East and North Africa before arriving in Europe in the 1700s. It was first described scientifically in 1777.

    Before the discovery of its Saudi Arabian connection in 1989, the origin of this heat- and drought-tolerant perennial was a hotly debated mystery. Was it native to Egypt, Syria, Aleppo, Tunis or Tangier?

    Tingitana grows in a wide range of conditions and is particularly useful as a border or cut-flower plant in dry gardens. It branches freely and features flower spikes with large numbers of 1-inch-long, bicolor, yellow and lavender blossoms. The roseleaf-type foliage is lime green, heavily textured and fragrant.

    Given full sun and well drained soil, this lovely sage forms a compact mound that also looks pretty in patio containers. This plant deserves to find a home in more gardens.

    Highly recommended.
    $9.00
  • Salvia villosa

    (Hairy Sage) In 1877, J.G. Schaffner of Germany -- also known as Johann Wilhelm Schaffner -- collected the small, airy looking Salvia villosa while working as a pharmacist in the town of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    Perhaps it was the cool powder blue and softly blended white beelines of the half-inch-long flowers that caught his eye. They bloom from summer into fall. Or maybe it was the contrast of the plants fuzzy, silvery gray foliage that made him take a specimen. In time, American botanist Merritt Lyndon Fernald would give the plant its scientific name using the term villosa to indicate its hairy quality.

    Hairy foliage conserves moisture. Salvia villosa is ideal for dry gardens, such as rockeries, due to its excellent drought resistance. It is heat tolerant and grows best in dry climates where it doesn't have to deal with much winter moisture.

    When these conditions are met, this pretty, little sage is a pleasing plant. To help it succeed outside the Southwest, we recommend growing it in a container where it can be sheltered from heavy winter moisture. Give this plant full sun, great drainage and limited water in USDA Zones 8 to 11. That's all it needs.

    Very limited.
    $9.00
  • Salvia viscosa

    (Mid-East Sage) Native to the mountains shared by Israel and Lebanon, this fragrant sage is drought resistant, heat tolerant and long blooming. Its tidy, basal foliage rises up and spreads only about 18 inches, but it has tall flower spikes.

    Sometimes called Sticky Sage, its scientific name refers to the stickiness of the plant's calyxes, which cup small, dusky pink flowers that bloom spring into summer. Its strap-shaped leaves form a dense rosette.

    Salvia viscosa is easy to grow. It is an efficient, heat-tolerant groundcover and is perfect for dry gardens in USDA Zones 8 to 10. Combine it in a mixed border with the deep purple flowers of Salvia coahuilensis, which is similarly short and has the same cultural needs of full sun and well-drained soil. Although Salvia viscosa can get by with little watering, it appreciates average moisture based on local conditions.
    $6.50
  • Salvia x 'Waverly'

    (Waverly Sage) A pale pink to lavender blush adds delicate color to the white flowers of Waverly Sage, which are supported by plum-colored calyxes. Its mid-green leaves are lance shaped and veined.

    This is a tender, woody shrub that may remain evergreen or an herbaceous perennial that dies to ground, depending on the winter temperatures where you live.

    First called "Mark's Mystery White," this long-blooming, sun-loving plant that can tolerate some shade. It appears to be related to Mexican Bush Sage (S. leucantha), but it's likely we'll never know all the details of its heritage.

    Waverly Sage has a fountain-like form with long stems that rise up from the base and then arch downward. Height varies depending, once again, on local growing conditions. On our farm, it tends to reach about four feet high and six feet wide. However, it does well in a large container.

    Deer avoid this shrub, which is popular with butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds. Heat tolerant and drought resistant, it is a great choice for dry landscapes.

    $7.50
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I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.