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Salvia forsskaolii


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Salvia forsskaolii
Time to think about Fall Planting
This plant is
Ideal for Fall Planting

Description

(Balkan Sage) Violet-blue whorls of flowers and plentiful, fuzzy, basal leaves that reach an impressive length of 18 inches are two notable features about this hardy, herbaceous perennial, which is native to the Southeastern Balkan Peninsula.

Balkan Sage is found in coniferous forests, meadows and slopes from Bulgaria to Turkey's Black Sea coast. However, it is named after the 19th century Finnish plant collector Peter Forsskål, who collected botanical samples further south in Saudi Arabia.

Although deciduous in areas with cold winters, it blooms about nine months a year for us on the Northern California coast beginning in summer. Following a brief winter dormancy, it returns reliably every spring, clumping in a way that makes it look like Hosta from a distance. Yet, unlike that woodland plant, it grows well in full sun as well partial shade. It is a fine choice for a lightly shaded garden or border and is happy in the acid soil under conifers.

Give it soil with average fertility, occasional water and enough shade to promote lush growth. Your reward will be large flowers with lovely white and yellow bee lines attractive to hummingbirds and honeybees.

Details

Product rating
 
(0 reviews)  

In stock
7 item(s) available

Common name
Balkan Sage
USDA Zones
5 - 9
Size (h/w/fh)
36"/36"/48"
Exposure
Partial shade
Soil type
Well drained & rich
Water needs
Average
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$8.50

Options

Quantity (7 available)

Email me when nearly out of stock  



Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Morning sun / Afternoon shade
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant
Cut flower
Cut flower

Growing Habit

4 - 9
4 - 9
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
36 inches wide
36 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water
Drought resistant
Drought resistant

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Honeybees
Honeybees
Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Asplenium bulbiferum

    (Mother Fern) Ferns are low-maintenance plants that add a tropical look to the Salvia garden. This one grows well in USDA Zones 9 to 11. Mother Fern, which has a graceful, arching look and finely cut fronds, loves partial to full shade and lots of water. This makes it an excellent choice for damp, shady Southeastern gardens.

    Due to its arching nature, Mother Fern only measures 24 inches tall and looks particularly pretty with short Asian woodland sages and Salvias for warmer winter climes, such as the Rosy Bract Sage (Salvia rubiginosa), which has cool, violet-blue flowers. In addition to ample water, Mother Fern needs rich soil.

    The bulbiferum appellation of its scientific name, refers to the fern’s production of plantlets on the tips of its fronds. These babies drop off and grow into new plants, which explains the common name of Mother Fern. Another common name for this fern is Spleenwort. Whereas wort is Old English for “plant,” spleen refers to the fern’s ancient role as a medicinal plant.

    In the wilds of its Australian and New Zealand homelands, this deer-resistant plant grows as an epiphyte on trees and fern trunks as well as a rooted plant along shady rock croppings and waterways. Epiphytes don’t harm their host plants, because they only rely on tree trunks and other structures for support. When epiphytic instead of rooted in the soil, ferns consume nutrients and moisture drifting in the air. Tarra Bulga National Park in Victoria, Australia, is home to many Mother Ferns.

    $8.00
  • Salvia amplexicaulis

    Like a candelabra lit up with whorls of violet blossoms, the erect, branching flower spikes of Salvia amplexicaulis make this native of Southeastern Europe shine. On the Grecian island of Thassos, it brightens areas near the beach.

    The summer-blooming flowers are nestled inside leaf-like burgundy bracts that attach directly to, or clasp, the flower stems without petioles. This gives the plant its common name. Its bright green, fragrant foliage has attractively bumpy, lance-shaped leaves. This sage is a good choice for perennial borders, woodland gardens and cut-flower beds.

    Although S. amplexicaulis does fine with regular watering, it does love moisture. So it is an ideal choice for moist problem areas in the yard. Give it a setting with full sun to partial shade along with average garden soil that drains well. Deadhead the flowers to prolong bloom time and keep butterflies visiting. Speaking of wildlife, deer tend to avoid most sages including this one.

    Here’s another reason to love this pretty plant: Scientists think that the essential oil of S. amplexicaulis may be useful in fighting bacterial infections.

    Here is a link to a great set of pictures for this plant.

    $8.50
  • Salvia cadmica

    Whorls of deep violet blossoms are cupped by dark bracts on the flower spikes of this mid-height herbaceous sage from Turkey. Its bright green foliage is thick, corrugated and fragrant. This plant is lovely and hardy, so it is surprising that it wasn’t introduced to commercial cultivation until 2007.

    Salvia cadmica is an adaptable, heat-tolerant perennial that grows well in partial shade to full sun and blooms from late spring through early summer. It does well in USDA Zones 7 to 10, either in dry conditions or with regular watering due to its ability to tolerate drought.

    In its homeland, it thrives in rocky, well-drained soil at altitudes of about 3,000 to 5,000 feet. It is endemic to Turkey, which means that is the only country where it grows wild without human intervention. There are nearly 100 species of salvia native to Turkey, of which more than 50 percent are endemic.

    This colorful sage sometimes is mistaken for a neighboring plant, Salvia smyrnea and is occasionally referred to by the synonym Salvia conradii Staph .

    Use it in perennial borders, along pathways and in dry gardens. Honeybees and butterflies will soon discover it and aid pollination throughout your gardens. Deer, however, will leave it alone.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia canescens var. daghestanica

    (Caucasus Sage) This hardy ground cover sage grows 4 to 12 inches tall and 12 inches wide. The velvety white fur of its foliage aids moisture retention. Its soft, royal purple flowers make it stand out. We think this Salvia deserves to spread far and wide.

    A tough native of the Caucasus Mountains of central Asia, it survives the freezing temperatures of Zone 5, forming a tight mat that withstands light traffic. It blooms in early summer and again in fall. Plant this beauty in well-drained soil, but don't pamper it; Caucasus Sage grows well in harsh environments.

    This is one of the shortest Salvias we grow and makes a fine border edging or rock garden plant. We highly recommend its use as a ground cover, so we offer a discount for larger orders.

    Here is a great blog article about this plant.

    $9.00
  • Salvia hierosolymitana

    (Jerusalem Sage) This lovely herbaceous perennial is native to Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and the West Bank. Its clear pink flowers transition at times to a pink highlighted with violet lines and dots. Prominent glandular hairs on the buds, bracts and floral stems exude a fragrance that is delightful on a warm day.

    "Hierosolymitana" is related to the Greek word "hieros," which means holy and the Latin name for Jerusalem, "Hierosolyma." Palestinian Arabs sometimes use its leaves as a food wrap, similar to grape leaves. Jerusalem Sage needs full sun. Heat and drought tolerant, it seems to prefer being a bit dry.

    A short species that works well as a groundcover or border plant, Jerusalem Sage forms a basil rosette of mid-green leaves that gradually spread about 18 inches.  It blooms on and off throughout the growing season and seems especially generous in spring and fall.

    $8.50
  • Salvia leucantha 'Variegata'

    (Variegated Mexican Bush Sage) Although slow growing and somewhat finicky, this sage is a must-have for lovers of unique foliage. It has small purple flowers and highly variegated leaves with stems that are slightly twisted. The overall look is compact and dense.

    We have grown this Sage for many years.  Many similar-to-identical clones with Japanese names are on the market, but this is the best grower of a not particularly robust variety.

    Variegated Mexican Bush Sage likes partial shade. Plant it in humus-rich soil that is well drained and give it plenty of water.  It is a delight in a mixed planter.

    Limited quantities.
    $9.00
  • Salvia miltiorrhiza

    (Red Sage, Chinese Sage, Dan-shen)  The bright red, finger-like roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza have a long history in traditional Chinese  herbal  medicine.  We offer this important plant on a limited basis.

    WebMD reports that Danshen is used in Asia to treat a number of cardiovascular problems and "appears to thin the blood by preventing platelet and blood clotting." It is the subject of ongoing medical research.

    Danshen has fragrant lavender flowers that bloom in summer and seem to glow in the shade. This woodland plant grows well in partial shade. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and can handle ample moisture. Native to Asia, including areas that experience winter chill, it grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9.

    This is a petite plant rising from 12 to 24 inches tall. Danshen looks lovely in mixed borders with Hostas and other woodland plants. It is also a fine choice for edging shady pathways where you can view it up close.

    $8.50
  • Salvia nemorosa 'Royal Crimson Distinction'

    (Royal Crimson Distinction Woodland Sage) Grown for hundreds of years in cottage gardens throughout the world, Salvia nemorosa was described by Carl Linneaus in 1762. This variety's large flower spikes bloom a dark violet-crimson, then age to a softer pink.

    The species has experienced a great deal of breeding and improvement since the 1800s. Royal Crimson Distinction is one of the finest varieties we have seen to date. It tolerates the year-round warmth of Zone 9 as well as the winter chill of Zone 6

    This water-loving sage blooms from spring through summer, attracting bumblebees, butterflies and hummingbirds, but not deer. It grows best in a sunny spot, but can tolerate partial shade. Plant it in well-drained soil with average fertility.

    Long blooming and tough, this plant has become a mainstay of perennial borders worldwide. At 24 inches tall, it also works well as a groundcover or edging a path.

    Highly recommended.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia pachystachys

    (Caucasian Mountain Sage) The lavender, almost translucent flowers of this short Turkish sage bloom in summer and are surrounded by pale pink and green bracts. The combination looks fancy, like a summery party dress.

    However, this is a tough plant with sturdy, thick flower spikes as indicated by the botanical appellation “pachystachys.”

    This cold- and heat-tolerant sage is well adapted for the widely varying winter temperatures of USDA Zones 5 to 9. Native to the Caucasus Mountains between the Black and Caspian seas, it is a common sight in the East Anatolia region of Turkey.

    Also drought tolerant, this species is a good choice for full-sun, dry gardens where it can be used as a groundcover, path edging and shrub border. Similar to many Turkish sages, it does well in poorer soils as long as they are well drained.

    Although it looks yummy, deer leave it alone.

    $12.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia patens 'Cambridge Blue'

    (Cambridge Blue Gentian Sage) Cambridge Blue is one of the most famous varieties of Salvia patens, which was discovered in Central Mexico in 1838. Its powder blue flowers are delightful and cooling in the landscape.

    This variety grows well in full sun or partial shade. Well branched and compact, it has 2 1/2 inch flowers that bloom from summer into fall. Similar to other Gentian Sages, this is a reliable perennial, returning year after year in Zones 8 to 11. However, all varieties of this species are so lovely that they are worth growing as summer bedding plants in colder zones.

    British horticulturist Graham Stuart Thomas called Salvia patens "the best plant in cultivation."

    Highly recommended by hummingbirds, but not by deer!

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia pennellii

    (Tamaulipas Sage) Deep purple flowers, strong stems and attractively textured, gray-green foliage make this sage useful in the drought-resistant Salvia garden. Rising up to 5 feet tall and spreading feet wide, it is a fine backdrop.

    Although from Northeast Mexico, the botanical appellation "pennellii" indicates that this sage was named after botanist Francis Whittier Pennell (1886-1952) who specialized in the Snapdragon family and also conducted field work for the New York Botanical Garden in South America.

    This heat-resistant sub-shrub acts like a shrub in areas where winter temperatures seldom sink past about 25 degrees F. In colder areas, it grows like a herbaceous perennial that dies back after a frost.

    Use this plant at the rear of a border or in a dry wild garden.  It's a bit rowdy -- not terribly well mannered about sprawling -- but a vigorous grower. If you value drought resistance, heat tolerance and late-season bloom, this rare plant can do the job. We think it should be more widely grown.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia pratensis 'Lapis Lazuli'

    (Lapis Lazuli Meadow Sage) Ethereal, lilac-pink, parrot-shaped blossoms abound on the tall flower spikes of this Salvia pratensis cultivar. So don’t expect a blue as the name indicates, but do expect great beauty during summer bloom time.

    At 18 to 30 inches tall with a spread of 18 inches, this is a good plant for the second row of a layered, perennial border. Gray-green, dense and fragrant, its basal foliage works well as a groundcover in woodland gardens. Or add it as a central element in summer patio containers. Wherever you plant it, expect visits from honeybees and butterflies.

    When first planted, the foliage rosette resembles the leaves of primrose plants.

    Meadow Sages are native to Europe and Asia. The parent of this cultivar was first recorded in the late 17th century in the Kent area of Southeast England. Salvia pratensis is now considered an endangered species in England due to its rarity and decline.

    In 2008, a botanical preserve in Kent reported the theft of all its Salvia pratensis plants, an offense under England’s 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act. In contrast, the species is classified as invasive in Washington state. We have not noticed that to be the case in our gardens.

    This is another cold-tolerant Meadow Sage and grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9. Although it can survive drought, Lapis Lazuli Meadow Sage needs regular watering for best bloom. Keep it moist but not soggy. Plant it in average garden soil that isn’t too rich, but contains enough organic matter for good drainage. A location with morning sun and afternoon shade is best.

    Salvia pratensis is part of a closely connected group of Meadow Sages, including Salvia x sylvestris , Salvia x superba and Salvia nemorosa. As with other sages, in general, Lapis Lazuli’s foliage is safe from deer and rabbits.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia recognita

    (Turkish Cliff Sage) Spring into early summer, Turkish Cliff Sage produces erect, branching flower spikes 24 to 36 inches long that rise from basal foliage. They’re covered with whorls of pale pink blossoms with delicate white markings.

    Salvia recognita is endemic to Central Turkey, which means that is the only place where it originates in the wild. It's found at the base of cliffs at altitudes up to 4,000 feet where heat tolerance and drought resistance are necessary for survival. Long silky hairs give the plant’s light green leaves a grayish cast and help them conserve moisture. The leaves vary in size from 3 to 12 inches long.

    As a cliff dweller, this heat-tolerant sage is adjusted to rocky, dry soils. However, we’ve found that it can handle regular watering and isn’t picky about soil types except for requiring good drainage. It does well in either full sun or partial shade.

    Although deer don’t consider Salvia recognita a good snack, honeybees and butterflies love it. In the ground, it can grow from 3 to 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide. So it works well as a background or border planting. With careful trimming, it also looks lovely in containers.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia ringens

    (Mount Olympus Sage) Although not numerous, the deep violet and white flowers of Salvia ringens are eyecatching. Their wiry, branched spikes rise up to 5 feet tall from a dark green basal rosette.

    Ringens refers to the gaping look of the sage's two-lipped flowers, which bloom from summer into fall. Another notable characteristic about the plant's appearance is the fernlike look of its slightly gray foliage.

    This cold-hardy sage grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9. It is endemic to the mountainous Balkan countries of Southeastern Europe, which means those are the only places to which it is native. As its common name indicates, the largest concentration is on Greece's Mount Olympus -- the mythological home of the Titans.

    This sage is easy to grow. Give it full sun, good drainage and loamy but not-too-rich soil. Although it does well in dry gardens, this sage needs at least occasional summer watering and more while becoming established. Winter mulch is necessary in the coldest zones.

    Gardeners in the UK have grown Mount Olympus Sage in perennial borders since at least 1913. However, it has never become popular in the United States. We think this needs to change!

    Highly recommended!
    $9.50
  • Salvia sclarea

    (Clary or Clear Eye Sage or Eyebright) Pink-purple bracts and violet-purple flowers form a pastel cloud over the large, rumpled leaves of Clary Sage in summer. It is a towering beauty growing up to 5 feet tall. Sacred to some due to age-old use in herbal remedies, it is heavenly to look at.

    Depending on the nose of the gardener, its fragrance is either equally heavenly or hellishly rank like dirty socks. Personally, we enjoy Clary's musky aroma.

    Native to the Mediterranean, Clary loves full sun and works well in dry gardens as a background planting. It's also a good choice for a kitchen garden, because it also has a long history of culinary use. If you enjoy its fragrance, it is a fine choice for borders, cut flower gardens and containers.

    Clary is a biennial that blooms and dies the second year after it is planted. If you can tolerate snipping the lovely flower stalks before they wither, you can increase the plant's bloom. It reseeds, which means that you can expect new plants even though it isn't a perennial. Butterflies and honeybees love it, but deer leave it alone.

    $6.00

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia sclarea var turkestanica 'Piemont'

    (Italian Clary Sage) Clary Sages are well known for their use in folk remedies, aromatherapy and cosmetics. Glowing purple bracts frame the spectacular white blooms of this cultivar on 5-foot-tall spikes. It is a delight for honeybees and butterflies.

    The foot-long hairy leaves of this rosette-forming herbaceous perennial are striking for their symmetry and dark petioles.

    Flowering begins in early summer; if you remove the spent spikes, bloom time continues until close to fall.  Use Italian Clary Sage in perennial borders and background plantings.

    The key to long-term success with this ancient species is to never allow seed to form. Pruning the spikes is a difficult choice, because the bracts are so showy. However, failure to do so results in a short -lived plant. The cut stems look pretty in flower arrangements.

    Give this plant full sun and well-drained soil. Although it is drought resistant and works well in dry gardens, this sage responds well to average watering based on local conditions.

    Clary Sage is native to Europe. It was one of the first Salvias described by the Ancient Greeks, who used it medicinally to make eye washes and other remedies. Although some gardeners disagree, our noses know that this plant's heady aroma is a blessing in the garden.

    We highly recommend this plant as the best variety of its species.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia urticifolia

    (Nettle Leaf Sage) Native from the Southeastern United States up to Pennyslvania in the Mid-Atlantic, this colorful herbaceous perennial is an endangered species in Florida, Kentucky and Maryland.

    This short sage's common and botanical names refer to its prickly leaves, which resemble those of Stinging Nettle, Urtica diocea. Its rich, numerous, violet flowers have prominent white beelines and are about 1/2 inch long. They grow on foot-long spikes from summer into fall and are cupped by fuzzy, dark gray-green bracts.

    This is a vibrant plant for a shady garden, especially in a damp woodland setting. It does well in morning shade, partial shade and full shade. For best growth, give it well-drained soil and average watering based on local conditions. Although it is a water lover, it can survive drought when established.

    This US native deserves much greater prominence in our gardens. Honeybees and butterflies love it.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia verticillata

    (Lilac Sage) We try not to brag too much, but this is our own variety of Salvia verticillata from home-grown seed, and we think it is spectacular. Butterflies and honeybees also are in love with this long-blooming, heat-tolerant perennial.

    Spring into summer, dense whorls of blue-to-smoky lavender flowers cover 3-foot-tall spikes arising from fragrant, mint-green, basal foliage. This native of Europe and Central Asia is lovely when mixed in cut-flower arrangements.

    Although it only needs average watering based on local conditions, Lilac Sage works well in moist areas. It looks pretty in borders and containers and as a pathway edging. Give it full sun or partial shade in USDA Zones 5 to 9.

    We offer this plant at a very reasonable price in order to encourage its widespread planting. When you grow Salvia verticillata, you help us help the honeybees and other beneficial insects pollinating gardens.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia viridis 'Blue Monday'

    (Blue Monday Hormium Sage) Many gardeners shy away from annual sages, preferring the longer-lived herbaceous perennials or shrubs. However, this annual Clary Sage provides a spectacular display of intensely blue flowers from spring through summer. Dead head it for extra bloom, but let some reseed.

    This sage is a worthwhile addition to the fragrant, wildlife-friendly garden. Add a few to your landscape as an accent or plant Blue Monday en masse with Pink Sunday Hormium Sage. Use it in seasonal flowerbeds, your kitchen herb garden choice or a container. Butterflies and honeybees love it.

    We can't imagine not growing this old standard. Aside from being pretty and having tasty foliage, it is easy to grow and adaptable to a wide range of climates. This variety is one of the best of the blues, from British stock.

    Seasonally limited.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia x superba 'Adora Blue'

    (Adora Blue Meadow Sage) Adora Blue’s upright flower spikes are profuse with deep violet blossoms shaped like parrot beaks. They bloom all summer long on this deciduous, perennial Salvia native to Europe and Asia.

    Densely branched with multiple flower spikes, Adora Blue has fragrant foliage. The hairy, basal leaves of this clumping sage are green and are oblong to lance shaped.

    This petite Meadow Sage grows 12 to 18 inches tall and spreads only 12 inches. It is ideal for massing with other short Salvias along walkways or at the front of mixed border plantings. Due to its vertical habit, it works well as the centerpiece in a container of mixed plants. Cottage, cut flower, rock and woodland gardens are also good venues for this drought-resistant but water-loving sage. Locations with morning sun and afternoon shade are best.

    Similar to other Meadow Sages, Adora Blue is cold tolerant and grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9. Although it can survive drought, this sage needs regular watering for best bloom. Keep it moist but not soggy. Plant it in average garden soil that isn’t too rich, but contains enough organic matter for good drainage. If you live in a coastal area, part of the great news about this plant is that it can handle salty air and soil.

    Salvia x superba cultivars are related to Salvia x sylvestris, which is a hybrid of two other Meadow Sages. They are Salvia pratensis, which was first reported in England in 1696, and its relative Salvia nemorosa. The Meadow Sages are a closely connected group.

    Butterflies love Adora Blue; similar to other kinds of Salvia it is rich in nectar. However, the plant’s foliage isn’t tasty to deer and rabbits.
    $6.50
  • Salvia x superba 'New Dimension Pink'

    (New Dimension Rose Meadow Sage) Abundant, hot pink blossoms shaped like parrot beaks contrast dramatically with the pinkish-purple stems of the densely branched New Dimension Rose Meadow Sage. This deciduous, perennial native of Europe and Asia blooms all summer.

    The deep green, basal leaves of this petite clumping sage are lance shaped. At 12 to 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide, New Dimension Rose is ideal for massing with other short Salvias along walkways or at the front of mixed border plantings. Due to its vertical habit, it works well as the centerpiece in a container of mixed plants. Cottage, cut flower, rock and woodland gardens are also good venues for this drought-resistant but water-loving sage. Also, although adaptable to full sun, it likes a bit of partial shade.

    Similar to other Meadow Sages, this one is cold tolerant and grows well in USDA Zones 5 to 9. Although it can survive drought, New Dimension Rose needs regular watering for best bloom. Keep it moist but not soggy. Plant it in average garden soil that isn’t too rich, but contains enough organic matter for good drainage.

    Salvia x superba cultivars are related to Salvia x sylvestris , which is a hybrid of two other Meadow Sages. They are Salvia pratensis, which was first reported in England in 1696, and its relative Salvia nemorosa. The Meadow Sages are a closely connected group.

    Butterflies love New Dimension Rose, because of its rich nectar. However, as with other sages, the plant’s foliage isn’t tasty to deer and rabbits.

    $6.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Phlomis tuberosa

    (Hardy Jerusalem Sage) A hardy, drought tolerant herbaceous perennial, this fine plant rewards you with tall spikes of rich pink whorled flowers in early to mid Summer. A Salvia relative is native to grasslands of Turkey, Iran and Siberia.

    The tall spikes if this plant are stunning.  Use it with Salvia guaranitica 'Purple Majesty' and Salvia forsskaolii as a tall backdrop to the border.

    A personal note - I tried for two years to successfully germinate seed of this plant.  In the Spring of 2009 I finally succeeded, and these strong, well established quarts are the result.  I hope you enjoy this plant as much as I do.

    $9.00
  • Salvia dominica

    (Dominican Sage) Native to Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria, this candelabra-shaped, perennial sage may have inspired the design of the menorah, (Exodus 37:17). It is a tough, drought-resistant plant with silver-haired foliage and bright white flowers that seem to blaze.

    The specific epitaph dominica means "belonging to the Lord."  This medicinal sage has a heavenly fragrance and is used in perfumery, cosmetics and the production of a rare essential oil. Plant it in full sun as a compact border or in a dry garden. It makes a fine groundcover.

    Dominican Sage thrives in poor yet well-drained soil and doesn't require much water.  We have found it to be durable, but it does not tolerate wet, cold winters.  However, the fragrance of this plant on a warm day makes it worth growing as an annual.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia patens 'Guanajuato'

    (Guanajuato Giant Gentian Sage) At 3 inches long, the flowers of this Gentian Sage are the largest of any we grow. Guanjuato Giant is also unique for its tall, upright growth and heavily textured foliage.

    Spikes of deep, true blue flowers that rise up to 48 inches tall make this perennial sage a standout in the garden from summer into fall. This Gentian Sage is reliably perennial in USDA Zones 8 to 11. Its spectacular flowers also make it a fine choice as a summer bedding plant in areas with colder winters.

    Guanjuato Giant likes regular watering and rich, well-drained soil. It does fine in full sun or partial shade and can handle moist corners of the yard. Use it as a path edging, border, groundcover or container plant.

    German botanist Karl Hartweg discovered the Salvia patens species in 1838. British horticulturist Graham Stuart Thomas later called it "the best plant in cultivation."

    Although, true blue is not a part of the color spectrum that hummingbirds favor, they are attracted to Gentian Sages especially when mixed with red-flowered sages.

    $8.50
  • Salvia patens 'White Trophy'

    (White Trophy Gentian Sage) White Trophy loves partial shade and is the finest white Salvia patens available, with very large flowers that age to pale blue.

    Since the 1838 discovery of this herbaceous species from Central Mexico, Salvia patens has been a mainstay of the perennial garden. British horticulturist Graham Stuart Thomas called Salvia patens "the best plant in cultivation."

    Well branched and compact, this shade-loving variety has 2 1/2-inch flowers that bloom summer into fall. It is a reliable perennial, returning year after year in Zones 8 to 11. However, it is so lovely that it is worth growing as a summer bedding plant in colder zones. Whether grown as a perennial or annual, it is a perfect companion to any of the blue-flowered Gentian Sages.

    White Trophy can handle moist corners of the yard. Water it regularly and provide rich, well-drained soil. It looks pretty edging a shady path and in border, groundcover or container plantings.

    Highly recommended by butterflies, but not by deer!
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

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Quick Digs: Zone 5 - 9 Weedbuster Gardens for Average Moisture

Quick Digs: Zone 5 - 9 Weedbuster Gardens for Average Moisture


Category: Quick Digs
Posted: Jul 29, 2013 11:33 AM
Synopsis: "font-size: 12px; font-style: italic;">Quick Digs is a new serial containing short posts focused on a central issue. The topic for the first series is Salvia groundcovers for weed control, and this is the second article. Baby, it can be cold outside in Zone 5 during the winter! But the roots of all of these tough sages ( "font-style: italic;">Salvia spp.) listed here survive sustained frost and snow, then rise up again in spring. To minimize weed growth, the best defense is the good offense of dominating a flowerbed with sages, especially a mat-forming groundcover. Although much research is yet to be done, it appears that Salvia plant chemicals and growing patterns deter weed growth.
15 Select Salvias for Dry, Partial-Shade Gardening

15 Select Salvias for Dry, Partial-Shade Gardening


Category: Everything Salvias Blog
Posted: Mar 27, 2013 10:59 AM
Synopsis: Learning how to garden in dry shade requires mediation of the needs of all the plants involved. Dry shade is particularly abundant under trees, because they consume lots of water. Fortunately, numerous drought-resistant Salvias can handle life in dry, partial shade. Flowers by the Sea details basic considerations of dry shade gardening and identifies 15 sages for it.
I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.