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Salvia miniata


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Salvia miniata

Limited Availability Plant
Limited Availability

Available March to August only.

Learn more

Description

(Misty Mountain Sage or Belize Sage) Salvia miniata combines luminous reddish-orange flowers and glossy, myrtle-green leaves that are different from any sage foliage we know.

In its native habitat of Southern Mexico and Belize, this lush perennial grows at low elevations on shady, moist mountain slopes.

Bloom time is summer into fall in USDA Zones 9 to 11. On the Northern California coast where we grow Salvia miniata, it sometimes flowers from June through October. In Southern Florida, the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden has recorded continuous flowering for as long as 30 months.

This is such a pretty plant that it is worth growing as an annual in areas where winters are chillier, but warmth and moisture are ample from spring to fall. It has few equals as an attention-grabbing container plant and works well in perennial borders or edging pathways. It even grows well as a houseplant in a sunny, eastern-facing window.

Salvia minata can grow well in full sun if it receives plenty of water. However, it particularly does well in partial shade or in locations where there is morning sun and afternoon shade. Give it fertile, well-drained soil. Grow it, and you can expect visits from hummingbirds and butterflies.

Details

Product rating
 
(2 reviews)  

In stock
4 item(s) available

Common name
Misty Mountain Sage or Belize Sage
USDA Zones
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
36"/24"/42"
Exposure
Partial shade
Soil type
Well drained & rich
Water needs
Water loving
Pot size
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
Yes
Our price
$8.50

Options

Quantity (4 available)

Email me when nearly out of stock  



Here are some guidelines for success with this plant in your garden.
Click on an individual icon for more detailed information.

Exposure

Full sun
Full sun
Partial shade
Partial shade

Garden Uses

Container plant
Container plant

Growing Habit

9 - 11
9 - 11
36 inches tall
36 inches tall
24 inches wide
24 inches wide
Perennial
Perennial

Water Needs

Average water
Average water

Blooming Season

Fall blooming
Fall blooming
Summer blooming
Summer blooming

Wildlife

Deer resistant
Deer resistant
Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds
  • Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'

    (Forest Fire Tropical Sage) Butterflies and hummingbirds love the abundant, fire engine red flowers of this mostly annual sage. It's a popular cultivar of one of the first Salvias used for ornamental purposes -- Tropical Sage. The flowers are dramatically framed by reddish black bracts.

    A tender perennial in mild climates, this compact plant belongs in all gardens regardless of zone. Thomas Jefferson grew this drought-resistant, low-maintenance sage. Today, it is a favorite in borders and containers.

    Plant this long blooming, spectacularly showy sage in full sun or partial shade wherever you need a big splash of color. Give it regular watering and rich soil.

    $4.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia leucantha 'Variegata'

    (Variegated Mexican Bush Sage) Although slow growing and somewhat finicky, this sage is a must-have for lovers of unique foliage. It has small purple flowers and highly variegated leaves with stems that are slightly twisted. The overall look is compact and dense.

    We have grown this Sage for many years.  Many similar-to-identical clones with Japanese names are on the market, but this is the best grower of a not particularly robust variety.

    Variegated Mexican Bush Sage likes partial shade. Plant it in humus-rich soil that is well drained and give it plenty of water.  It is a delight in a mixed planter.

    Limited quantities.
    $9.00
  • Salvia longistyla

    (Red Michoacán Sage) No other Salvia has flowers that are such a deep blood red. The 3-to-4 inch long tubular blossoms of this shade-loving shrub are displayed in clusters at the ends of the stems, which have light green, textured leaves that are almost round.

    This sage is a beauty in containers and shrubby borders or as a groundcover. Although it can tolerate full sun, Red Michoacán prefers partial shade. So, if necessary, compromise by choosing a location with morning sun and afternoon shade. Sun or shade, hummingbirds will find their way to its nectar. Deer most likely will munch elsewhere.

    Confusion surrounds the scientific name of this plant. At various times, It has been improperly identified as Salvia tubiflora and as Salvia tubifera, which both are orange-flowered, Peruvian species. However, the foliage and growth habit of Salvia longistyla is much different.  This is the true, fall-blooming species.

    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia squalens 'Orange Form'

    (Orange Sticky Peruvian Sage) A bright, persimmon-orange with prominent beelines, the flowers of Salvia squalens never fail to attract attention. They bloom from spring into fall after the plant reaches 1 foot tall.

    This tropical-looking sage from Peru and Ecuador has large, almost round leaves that are heavily wrinkled and sticky. It is this stickiness of stems as well as leaves that gives it the appellation "squalens," which roughly means "dirty." The description refers to dust, insects and other stuff clinging to the plant.

    Salvia squalens is a short, fragrant shrub that needs full sun, rich and well-drained soil. Although it only requires average watering based on local conditions, it does well in moist areas of the landscape. As to levels of winter chill, it is comfortable in USDA Zones 9 to 11.

    Grow this sage as a container plant or as part of a shrub border. It does particularly well in moist areas. In our mild climate on the Northern California coast and in greenhouses, this spicy-looking beauty blooms almost year-round.
    $8.50

    OUT OF STOCK

  • Salvia urica

    (Blue Bush Sage) Furry, large and heavily textured, the mid-green leaves of Salvia urica contrast attractively with its violet-blue flowers that bloom spring into summer.

    Blue Bush Sage is a sub-shrub with woody stems as well as soft, herbaceous growth. It is native to moist, mountainous jungles in Chiapas, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras where it grows at altitudes from 1,000 to 8,500 feet. So it appreciates partial shade and moisture.

    Plant this dramatic hummingbird sage in a container. Or add it to a shrubby border in a woodland garden. It grows quickly, and starts blooming early in the season. In areas with colder winters than those of USDA Zone 9, it is an excellent annual.

    Highly recommended.
    $8.50
  • Salvia elegans 'Tangerine'

    (Tangerine Pineapple Sage) This citrus-scented cultivar is our smallest variety of Pineapple Sage. Worth growing just for the exotic scent of its leaves, this culinary Salvia is also one of the longest blooming plants in its species.

    How is this variety of Pineapple Sage different from Honey Melon?  Tangerine's leaves are much smaller (1/2 inch x 1 inch as opposed to 1 inch x 1 1/2 inches), and the plant is shorter (18 inches tall vs. 24 inches). Tangerine also has darker red flowers, foliage with a very different scent and a shrubbier look. Of course, anyone who loves scented plants should have both.

    Tangerine Pineapple Sage spreads into a dense clump with underground runners. By cutting back older stems to the ground, new fresh growth keeps it in flower for months. On the Northern California coast, it starts blooming no later than May and sometimes continues until February.

    Grow this cultivar in partial shade in warmer zones or in full sun in the coolest part of its range. Along with Honey Melon, Tangerine is easier to grow in most of the country than the larger-growing varieties of Pineapple Sage.

    Native to Mexico, Pineapple Sage is found at high elevations in Pine and Oak forests. The species is used as a medicinal herb -- such as in herb tea -- to relieve anxiety and treat hypertension. Just smelling the leaves makes us happier.
    $8.50
Average customer rating:
 
(2 reviews)  



2 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
Marilyn
Apr 7, 2014
I love growing miniata. It's bright reddish-orange flowers beckons your attention. Attracts Hummers, which I love.

I grow it every year.
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Brandon the Herb Guy
Feb 23, 2014
I originally planted this near a leak in my irrigation system. Then the leak was fixed, then the sprinklers went off for a rather impressively dry summer.

Belize Sage barely seemed to notice. The one thing it did was lean into the shade to conserve moisture. When it started blooming those bright red flowers, I knew I needed more of them. It's a bit fragile, but recovers well.
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I like Amstiad

Hummingbirds love Salvia (sage) nectar and are attracted to it by the bright colors of tubular sage blossoms. In particular, these little whirlybirds can easily spot flowers in the red spectrum, which is prevalent among sages. Here are some hummingbird gardening tips.


  1. Go tubular. Hummingbirds need tubular flowers that are easy for long, thin beaks to access.
  2. Provide lots of color. Think of yourself as a cafeteria manager who needs to provide many tempting choices in order to attract business. Red, pink, orange and purple sages are particularly powerful hummingbird magnets.
  3. Keep your garden blooming. Plant a variety of Salvias based not only on color but also a broad span of bloom times. Many flower from spring into fall. Others are prolific fountains of nectar for shorter seasons. Numerous winter-blooming species are available for areas that are home to hummingbirds year round.
  4. Grow sages native to the Western Hemisphere. Although hummingbirds will take advantage of many kinds of tubular flowering plants, these tiny birds are native to the Western Hemisphere and prefer flowering plants native to their half of the world.
  5. Select Salvia companion plants. Hummingbirds appreciate a variety of favorite tubular-flowered plants.
  6. Plant hummingbird gardens near cover. Trees and bushes surrounding feeding areas provide protection from predators and chilly, rainy weather.
  7. Don't use pesticides. Insects provide protein for hummingbirds, so don't kill these food sources.
  8. Provide water. Hummingbirds frolic in misters and shallow birdbaths.
  9. Supplement plantings with feeder tubes. Change the sugar water every few days and don't add food coloring. Keep the feeders clean, but don't scrub them with soaps or detergents. Here is more feeder care information.
  10. Read more. Our Everything Salvias Blog offers a number of articles about hummingbirds.
Hey, got any greens?

If you live in suburbs or rural areas where deer plunder gardens, Salvias (sages) can be part of your plan for discouraging these hungry visitors. Here are some tips.


  1. Mask smells that deer like with aromatic sages. Deer and other members of the Cervidae family, such as elk, mostly leave Salvias alone. One theory is that they don't like the fragrance or taste of sage chemicals. Strategically planting sages near vegetable gardens or fruit trees -- elixir to deer -- may prevent consumption.
  2. Grow hedges including Salvias. Prickly hedges, including hairy-leafed Salvias and exceptionally thorny roses, can discourage deer from entering your yard. They don't like the mouth-feel of those textures. Tall hedges also hide strawberry beds and other yummy plantings from view.
  3. Don't overplant one species. Grow a variety of Salvias in case local deer take an unexpected liking to one species of sage.
  4. Fence deer out. Install electric fences or 8-foot wood or metal fences around particularly vulnerable areas. Make sure electric fencing is turned on during the peak feeding seasons of early spring and late fall.
  5. Use motion-detection tools. Install outdoor lighting that is activated by movement.
  6. Let the dogs out. Deer are especially wary of large dogs.
  7. Surround and cover. Wrap tough plastic around the trunks of trees that have tasty bark and cover foliage with bird netting when trees and bushes are fruiting.
  8. Change yard ornaments periodically. Objects such as scarecrows, statuary and cordons of monofilament string with strips of shiny foil attached cause deer to shy away.
  9. Make safe choices. Research repellants you plan to use to make sure they aren't poisonous.
  10. Be flexible and ready to share a bit. There is no such thing as a completely deer-resistant garden.

Looking for our latest introductions? Visit our New Arrivals page.