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Asian Natives

Asian Natives

Asia is a huge continent and home to Salvias in countries other than China and Japan. A wealth of species are found in the Himalayas, the steppes of Central Asia and the Middle Eastern lands of the Fertile Crescent, including Israel.

The sages listed here are a diverse group, and many are not well known in the general nursery trade. We encourage you to explore these gems of the plant world.

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  • Salvia bowleyana

    (Nan dan shen) Lavender and pearly white blossoms shaped like parrot beaks are supported by burgundy and green calyxes on this cold-tolerant plant from Southern China. In summer, the flowers grow in whorl-like clusters on spikes reaching up to 5 feet tall above large, fuzzy, pinnate, olive-green leaves.

    $14.50
     

  • Salvia cadmica

    (Wand Sage) Whorls of deep violet blossoms are cupped by dark bracts on the flower spikes of this mid-height herbaceous sage from Turkey. Its foliage is thick, corrugated and fragrant. This plant is lovely and hardy, so it is surprising that it wasn’t introduced to commercial cultivation until 2007.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia caespitosa

    (Anatolian Cushion Sage) Rising up only 6 to 8 inches, this is a pixie-sized sage that loves gritty soils. It is perfect for dry gardens with gritty soils in USDA Zones 5 to 9. In fact, it seems to love the colder zones best. We think it is particularly fond of frozen ground in winter, because that helps keep its roots from getting too damp.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia campanulata

    (Campanula Leaf Sage) Spectacular yellow-flowering Salvias are rare, so this one stands out. Its large, almost round leaves form a basal clump that is attractive and tough. Bright yellow flowers arise from the clump on stems up to 48 inches tall.

    $9.50
     

  • Salvia canescens var. daghestanica

    (Caucasus Sage) This hardy ground cover sage grows 4 to 12 inches tall and 12 inches wide. The velvety white fur of its foliage aids moisture retention. Its soft, royal purple flowers make it stand out. We think this Salvia deserves to spread far and wide.

    $9.00
     

  • Salvia cyanescens

    (Blue Turkish Sage) Large velvety gray-green to white leaves in loose rosettes give this sage a distinctive look as does the celestial violet-blue of its flowers. The blossoms seem much too large for this short sage and its thin, candelabra-branched flower spikes.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia dolichantha

    (Purple Szechuan Sage or chang hua shu di cao) Rich violet flowers seem to hover in the air above this hardy, shade-loving, herbaceous perennial from the mountains of Szechuan, China. They bloom from late summer through fall on branched spikes rising up to 5 feet long from clumping foliage.
    $9.50
     

  • Salvia dominica

    (Dominican Sage) Native to Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria, this candelabra-shaped, perennial sage may have inspired the design of the menorah, (Exodus 37:17). It is a tough, drought-resistant plant with silver-haired foliage and bright white flowers that seem to blaze.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia eigii

    (Eig's Sage)Bicolor ruby and pale pink flowers bloom winter to spring on this small sage that is native to Northern Israel. Salvia eigii is at home in the silty, gravelly loam of low fallow fields near rivers. So it does best in rich soil aerated with plenty of humus.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia fruticosa

    (Greek Sage) Most of the dried culinary sage sold in the United States is Greek Sage. Frescoes on the island of Crete dated to 1400 BC depict this plant, which was used by the Phoenicians and Greeks for cooking and medicine. It is an ancient and beloved friend of mankind.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Momobana'

    (Pink Makino) The gracefully shaped, two-tone flowers of Pink Makino look like ballerinas in tutus. This shade-loving sage comes from moist, mountain woodlands on the Japanese island of Honshu. In Northern California, it blooms for us in late fall.
    $11.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Shi Ho'

    (Makino) We would grow this rare clone of the woodland Japanese native Salvia glabrescens even if it never flowered, because the arrow-shaped foliage is so lush, toothed and colorful. As they age, the arrow-shaped leaves transform from yellowish green to dark green.

    $13.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Yellow & Purple'

    (Makino) The unusual flower color and short, mounding growth of this clone of Salvia glabrascens -- a woodland Japanese native -- make it distinctive. The blossoms are nearly clear yellow with striking purple beelines.
    $11.50
     

  • Salvia glutinosa

    (Jupiter's Distaff) Easy to grow and adaptable to a wide range of conditions, this native of Europe and Asia is our best tall, yellow-flowering perennial. Although its common name compares the flower spikes to wool spindles, they look more like glowing sceptres.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia hians

    (Himalayan Sage or Kashmir Sage) The word "hians" in Salvia hians means "gaping" and refers to the hanging lip of this sage's flowers, which are a dusky violet and bloom from late spring through early fall.

    $9.50
     

  • Salvia hierosolymitana

    (Jerusalem Sage) This lovely herbaceous perennial is native to Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and the West Bank. Its clear pink flowers change at times to a pink highlighted with violet lines and dots. Prominent glandular hairs on the buds, bracts and floral stems exude a fragrance that is delightful on a warm day.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia indica

    (Two-lip Spotted Sage) Shaped like an open parrot's beak, the upper lip of this petite yet dramatic sage is lilac while the lower lip is dark violet and white with spots. The whorled flower spikes rise up from clumps of large, oval, grassy green leaves with scalloped edges.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia japonica

    (Japanese Woodland Sage or Shu Wei Cao) This short, lavender-flowered, ornamental sage has purple-to-green foliage. In Asia, this woodland plant has long been an important medicinal herb, used in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes.
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia judaica

    (Judean Sage) Native to the mountains of Judea in Israel, this dark violet flowered, perennial sage is unique among the Palestinian Salvias - as a woodland native it grows well in partial shade. It is a tough, drought-resistant plant with deeply cut & hairy foliage which forms impressive mounds of color in the spring and early summer.

    $9.50
     

  • Salvia jurisicii

    (Yugoslavian Cut Leaf Sage) This is a rare Baltic steppe plant that grows beautifully in sunny locations with little water and excellent drainage. It is endemic to a the Orlova Brdo region of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

    $11.50
     

  • Salvia koyamae

    (Shinano-akigiri) Japan's largest island, Honshu, is home to Salvia koyamae, a shade- and moisture-loving herbaceous perennial that is perfect for woodland gardens or shady borders. It is notable for yellow flowers, which bloom from late summer into fall, as well as arrow-shaped foliage.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia lanigera

    (Wooly Arabian Sage) "Radiant" is the word that garden writer and Salvia specialist Betsy Clebsch uses to describe the halo of white hairs covering the foliage and calyxes of Salvia lanigera.

    $9.00
     

  • Salvia miltiorrhiza

    (Red Sage, Chinese Sage, Dan-shen)  The bright red, finger-like roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza have a long history in traditional Chinese  herbal  medicine.  We offer this important plant on a limited basis.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia nipponica 'BSWJ5829'

    (Kyushu Woodland Sage) We are in love with this short forest sage from Kyushu, Japan. Its clusters of large creamy flowers pale as fresh-churned butter begin blooming in September. Even when not blooming, its foliage is showy in a shady garden.
    $9.50
     

  • Salvia nipponica 'Fuji Snow'

    (Variegated Japanese Woodland Sage) Irregular white margins surrounding deep green make the triangular leaves of this fine Japanese forest sage lighten the shade. In fall, pale yellow flowers add to the standout effect.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia nipponica var. Formosana

    (Formosan Woodland Sage or Tai wan qin zhu cao) A native of Taiwan, this Salvia nipponica grows well in hot, humid climates as well as milder locales.
    $10.00
     

  • Salvia nubicola

    (Himalayan Cloud Sage) Nepal's Muktinath Valley -- a sacred site for Hindus and Buddhists -- is the place to go to see this majestically tall shade perennial in the wild. It grows at altitudes up to 14,000 feet and often emerges while the ground is still snowy.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia nubicola 'CC7500'

    (Giant Himalayan Cloud Sage) Thank you, Chris Chadwell, for collecting seed for this plant at high elevations in Nepal last fall.  We find this wild variety to be larger and more robust than the domestic strain, with deeper floral color and higher flower count.  We are very excited to be able to offer this exceptional variety.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia nutans

    (Nodding Sage) “Dancing in the air” is how garden writer Joseph Tychonievich describes the tall, graceful flower spikes of Nodding Sage, which can tower up to 5 feet tall over the plant’s 18-inch-tall foliage during the summer flowering season.

    $9.00
     

  • Salvia pachystachys

    (Caucasian Mountain Sage) The lavender, almost translucent flowers of this short Turkish sage bloom in summer and are surrounded by pale pink and green bracts. The combination looks fancy, like a summery party dress.

    $12.00
     

  • Salvia plectranthoides

    (Chang guan shu wei cao) An annual or biennial in its native Southern China, Bhutan and India, this plant has been a reliable perennial for us for many years. With its open, airy structure and pale lavender flowers, this sage is best viewed close up or against a darker background.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum

    (Dan-shen Gansu) Growing into a large basal rosette of leaves measuring up to 3 feet across, Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum is known for its handsome foliage.

    $9.50
     

  • Salvia recognita

    (Turkish Cliff Sage) Spring into early summer, Turkish Cliff Sage produces erect, branching flower spikes 24 to 36 inches long that rise from basal foliage. They’re covered with whorls of pale pink blossoms with delicate white markings.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia regeliana

    (The Queen's Sage) Regal spikes of lavender-to-purple flowers give weight to this sage's common name. It provides a stately show of bloom during summer in USDA Zones 6 to 10. Cold hardy and heat tolerant, this impressive perennial comes from the mountains of Turkey.

    $8.50
     

  • Salvia sp. from Szechuan

    (Bicolor Szechuan Sage) Cold hardy Chinese Salvias are a large and confusing group when it comes to scientific nomenclature. Identification for naming is expensive and difficult. That is why one of our most popular varieties doesn't have a scientific name!
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia sp. from Yunnan

    (Mystery Yunnan Sage) Sometimes we come across a beauty that has no name. This lovely species from China's Yunnan province is an excellent example. Aside from lacking scientific and common names, it arrived here as an imported seed with little information about how the plant was discovered.

    $9.00
     



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Reviews


I love the true blue flowers of my Salvia pitcheri grandiflora. The plants arrived in excellent condition in early October and have continued to flower despite cool nights.
Mrs. Alicia Rudnicki
Oct 23, 2014