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Zone 5 Hardy

Zone 5 Hardy

Zone 5 Salvias are generally hardy to -20 degrees F. They are mainly herbaceous perennials with soft foliage that dies back to the ground for winter. A few are subshrubs -- semi-woody perennials.

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  • Salvia azurea

    (Prairie Sage) Native to a large part of the central United States, this perennial Salvia is a beloved wildflower, delighting us with large cerulean blue flowers. Hummingbirds and butterflies love it as well.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia bowleyana

    (Nan dan shen) Lavender and pearly white blossoms shaped like parrot beaks are supported by burgundy and green calyxes on this cold-tolerant plant from Southern China. In summer, the flowers grow in whorl-like clusters on spikes reaching up to 5 feet tall above large, fuzzy, pinnate, olive-green leaves.
    $14.50
     

  • Salvia caespitosa

    (Anatolian Cushion Sage) Rising up only 6 to 8 inches, this is a pixie-sized sage that loves gritty soils. It is perfect for dry gardens with gritty soils in USDA Zones 5 to 9. In fact, it seems to love the colder zones best. We think it is particularly fond of frozen ground in winter, because that helps keep its roots from getting too damp.

    $12.50
     

  • Salvia campanulata

    (Campanula Leaf Sage) Spectacular yellow-flowering Salvias are rare, so this one stands out. Its large, almost round leaves form a basal clump that is attractive and tough. Bright yellow flowers arise from the clump on stems up to 48 inches tall.

    $9.50
     

  • Salvia canescens var. daghestanica

    (Caucasus Sage) This hardy ground cover sage grows 4 to 12 inches tall and 12 inches wide. The velvety white fur of its foliage aids moisture retention. Its soft, royal purple flowers make it stand out. We think this Salvia deserves to spread far and wide.
    $8.00
     

  • Salvia cleistogama

    (Closed Sage) Yellow flowers are rare among Salvias. So this elegant European sage is greatly appreciated. It is an herbaceous perennial that has become naturalized in eight states in the U.S. The common name refers to its flowers self-pollinating before opening.

    $7.50
     

  • Salvia deserta

    (xin jiang shu wei cao) Long, branched spikes of purple flowers with purple-red bracts are one of the ornamental attractions of Salvia deserta, which grows well in USDA Zones 6 to 9. However, it is also well known as a medicinal sage in its Asian homelands.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia dolichantha

    (Purple Szechuan Sage or chang hua shu di cao) Rich violet flowers seem to hover in the air above this hardy, shade-loving, herbaceous perennial from the mountains of Szechuan, China. They bloom from late summer through fall on branched spikes rising up to 5 feet long from clumping foliage.
    $9.50
     

  • Salvia forsskaolii

    (Balkan Sage) Violet-blue whorls of flowers and plentiful, fuzzy, basal leaves that reach an impressive length of 18 inches are two notable features about this hardy, herbaceous perennial, which is native to the Southeastern Balkan Peninsula.

    $7.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Momobana'

    (Pink Makino) The gracefully shaped, two-tone flowers of Pink Makino look like ballerinas in tutus. This shade-loving sage comes from moist, mountain woodlands on the Japanese island of Honshu. In Northern California, it blooms for us in late fall.
    $11.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Shi Ho'

    (Makino) We would grow this rare clone of the woodland Japanese native Salvia glabrescens even if it never flowered, because the arrow-shaped foliage is so lush, toothed and colorful. As they age, the arrow-shaped leaves transform from yellowish green to dark green.

    $13.50
     

  • Salvia glabrescens 'Yellow & Purple'

    (Makino) The unusual flower color and short, mounding growth of this clone of Salvia glabrascens -- a woodland Japanese native -- make it distinctive. The blossoms are nearly clear yellow with striking purple beelines.
    $11.50
     

  • Salvia glutinosa

    (Jupiter's Distaff) Easy to grow and adaptable to a wide range of conditions, this native of Europe and Asia is our best tall, yellow-flowering perennial. Although its common name compares the flower spikes to wool spindles, they look more like glowing sceptres.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia greggii 'Cold Hardy Pink'

    (Cold Hardy Pink Autumn Sage) Medium creamy-hot pink flowers and contrasting, red bracts make this Autumn Sage stand out. This drought tolerant Autumn Sage from Northern Texas is also compact, rugged, heat tolerant and capable of handling Zone 5 chill. Yes - Zone 5!
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia japonica

    (Japanese Woodland Sage or Shu Wei Cao) This short, lavender-flowered, ornamental sage has purple-to-green foliage. In Asia, this woodland plant has long been an important medicinal herb, used in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes.
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia lycioides x greggii 'San Isidro'

    (Saint Isidro's Sage) This hardy, lavender-blue-flowered Salvia comes from Southern Texas and has the same breeding as the famous Ultra Violet Autumn Sage. Although it needs warmer winter temperatures and has smaller foliage, it also does well in stressful conditions, including drought.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia lycioides x greggii 'Ultra Violet'

    (Ultra Violet Hybrid Sage) Hardy is a word bandied about by gardeners and nurserymen. Its use is often exaggerated. But this fine hybrid deserves to be called "the hardiest Autumn Sage." It's Zone-5 hardy, drought resistant and has lovely, soft purple flowers. Ultra Violet is a winner.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia lyrata 'Purple Prince'

    (Purple Prince Lyreleaf Sage or Cancerweed) Due to its short height and reddish-purple, veined leaves, Purple Prince Lyreleaf Sage often is descriped as looking like Bugleweed (Ajuga reptans).
    $6.00
     

  • Salvia nubicola

    (Himalayan Cloud Sage) Nepal's Muktinath Valley -- a sacred site for Hindus and Buddhists -- is the place to go to see this majestically tall shade perennial in the wild. It grows at altitudes up to 14,000 feet and often emerges while the ground is still snowy.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia pachyphylla 'Blue Flame'

    (Giant Purple Desert Sage) It’s best to plant this flamboyant native of the Southwest in spring or summer. However, once established, it tolerates winters from USDA Zones 5 to 9. Purple tubular flowers and burgundy bracts flare up its 10-inch flower spikes like flames on this softly rounded shrub.
    $8.50
     

  • Salvia pachystachys

    (Caucasian Mountain Sage) The lavender, almost translucent flowers of this short Turkish sage bloom in summer and are surrounded by pale pink and green bracts. The combination looks fancy, like a summery party dress.
    $10.00
     

  • Salvia pitcheri grandiflora

    (Big Pitcher Sage) As its scientific name indicates, this sage has very large flowers. They are almost two-tone, changing from deep violet to a light blue or white at their base where they are cupped by dusky purple calyxes.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia pratensis 'Indigo'

    (Indigo Meadow Sage) When massed, this European sage compels attention during summer with its upright, foot-long spikes of deep violet-blue flowers and hairy, gray-green, basal foliage.

    $7.50
     

  • Salvia pratensis 'Lapis Lazuli'

    (Lapis Lazuli Meadow Sage) Ethereal, lilac-pink, parrot-shaped blossoms abound on the tall flower spikes of this Salvia pratensis cultivar. So don’t expect a blue as the name indicates, but do expect great beauty during summer bloom time.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum

    (Dan-shen Gansu) Growing into a large basal rosette of leaves measuring up to 3 feet across, Salvia przewalskii var. mandarinorum is known for its handsome foliage.
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia reflexa

    (Rocky Mountain Sage) Rocky Mountain Sage is so ubiquitous in the lower 48 states and in Canada that it is difficult to determine where it is native versus being introduced. This is a hardy, adaptable plant has pale blue flowers that bloom in summer and are surrounded by bright green bracts and lance-shaped leaves.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia reptans

    (West Texas Grass Sage) Small clusters of true blue flowers are spaced widely along the grass-like stems of this airy West Texas mountain sage. Like so many American native plants, it is a key food source for honeybees, butterflies and hummingbirds.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia sp. from Szechuan

    (Bicolor Szechuan Sage) Cold hardy Chinese Salvias are a large and confusing group when it comes to scientific nomenclature. Identification for naming is expensive and difficult. That is why one of our most popular varieties doesn't have a scientific name!
    $9.00
     

  • Salvia stepposa

    (Siberian Sage) Deep violet flowers surrounded by burgundy bracts form a handsome contrast with the pebbly, mint green foliage of this drought-resistant sage. It comes from the Central Asian steppe, which is similar in climate and geography to America’s high plains.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia trijuga

    (san ye shu wei cao) So what do all those Pinyin words mean in this sage’s common name? We’ll give you an answer to the best of our ability in a minute. Meanwhile, we need to note that this medicinal Asian sage has handsome foliage and deep violet flowers.
    $7.50
     

  • Salvia verbenacea

    (Wild Sage) Toothed and attractively wrinkled, the gray-green, basal foliage of Wild Sage contrasts prettily with deep lavender-to-purple flowers supported by grassy green bracts. This cold-hardy sage is native to northern Africa and parts of Asia and Europe.

    $7.50
     

  • Salvia verticillata

    (Lilac Sage) We try not to brag too much, but this is our own variety of Salvia verticillata from home-grown seed, and we think it is spectacular. Butterflies and honeybees also are in love with this long-blooming perennial beauty.

    $7.50
     

  • Salvia x superba 'Adora Blue'

    (Adora Blue Meadow Sage) Adora Blue’s upright flower spikes are profuse with deep violet blossoms shaped like parrot beaks. They bloom all summer long on this deciduous, perennial Salvia native to Europe and Asia.
    $6.50
     

  • Salvia x superba 'New Dimension Blue'

    (New Dimension Blue Meadow Sage) Deep violet blue blossoms shaped like parrot beaks cluster thickly on the dark stems of the densely branched New Dimension Blue Meadow Sage. This deciduous, perennial native of Europe and Asia blooms all summer.

    $6.50
     

  • Salvia x superba 'New Dimension Pink'

    (New Dimension Rose Meadow Sage) Abundant, hot pink blossoms shaped like parrot beaks contrast dramatically with the pinkish-purple stems of the densely branched New Dimension Rose Meadow Sage. This deciduous, perennial native of Europe and Asia blooms all summer.

    $6.50
     

  • Salvia yunnanensis

    (Yunnan Sage or yun nan shu wei cao) Yunnan Sage's tall spikes of violet-to-purple flowers bloom from summer into fall. Native to Southwestern China's provinces of Yunnan, Guizhou and Sichuan, it grows on shady, grassy hillsides and along forest margins at elevations up to 9,500 feet.
    $12.50
     



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Reviews


One of my favorites. The color of the beautiful blue flowers and the way the interesting looking flowers are what made me want it. I've grown it for a couple of different years as an annual in containers. Made a great container plant. Easy to ...
Marilyn from KY (zone 6a)
Apr 11, 2014