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 You are here    Flowers by the Sea / Salvias A to Z / Salvia indica

Salvia indica

Rated: 

(Two-lip Spotted Sage) Shaped like an open parrot's beak, the upper lip of this petite yet dramatic sage is lilac while the lower lip is dark violet and white with spots. The whorled flower spikes rise up from clumps of large, oval, olive green leaves with scalloped edges.
Price: $11.50
Qty:
Degree of Difficulty
Easy
Degree of Difficulty
This plant is easy to grow in a variety of conditions.
Common name
This is the non-scientific name used for a plant. A plant may have several common names, depending on the gardener's location. To further confuse the matter, a common name may be shared by several completely different plants. At Flowers by the Sea, we rely on the scientific name to identify our plants and avoid confusion.
Two-lip Spotted Sage
USDA Zones
The U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones indicate the temperature zones where a plant is likely to thrive. It is determined by the average annual winter minimum temperature. Actual winter temperatures may be higher or lower than the average.
9 - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
The anticipated mature size of the plant: Height, Width & Flower Height.
24"/30"/42"
Exposure
This is the average amount of sunlight that a plant needs to thrive. Generally, full sun exposure is 6 or more hours of direct sun daily while partial shade is less than 4 hours of sun or dappled shade all day. Plants may tolerate more sunlight in cooler climates and need afternoon shade in extremely hot climates.
Full sun
Soil type
This is the kind of soil that a plant needs to thrive. Most plants require a well-drained soil that allows the water to soak into the soil without becoming soggy. Sandy and clay soils can be improved by digging in compost to improve drainage.
Well drained
Water needs
Plants have specific water requirements. Water loving means the plant needs regular watering to keep the soil moist. Average generally indicates applying 1 inch of water per week, or watering when the soil is dry to a depth of 3 to 4 inches. One inch of water is equal to 5 gallons per square yard of soil surface.
Average
Pot size
This is the size of the pot your plant will arrive in.
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
"Yes" indicates that this plant can be successfully grown as a container plant.
Yes
  • Salvia indica
  • Salvia indica
  • Salvia indica
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Ratings & Reviews

(Two-lip Spotted Sage) Shaped like an open parrot's beak, the upper lip of this petite yet dramatic sage is lilac while the lower lip is dark violet and white with spots. The whorled flower spikes rise up from clumps of large, oval, olive green leaves with scalloped edges.

It's unknown why Carl Linnaeus gave this sage a scientific name indicating a connection to India, because it is not native to that country. Instead, it is found on rocky, limestone slopes at altitudes up to 5,000 feet in Iran, Iraq, Palestine and Turkey.

This species needs rainfall or supplemental irrigation during the rapid growth & flowering that occurs when coming out of dormancy in the spring.  Lack of water at this point in their growth cycle will greatly impact the health of the plant.  This can happen early in the year in warmer areas, so be ready.

After flowering the plant slows down and it's water requirements diminish.  In anything less than perfectly drained soil there is a real danger of over-watering and subsequent rot. The plant goes into a semi-dormancy that ends with the shorter days of fall, when another growth & blooming cycle is common.

Growing Salvia indica in containers make sense for many gardeners that do not have lime rich, well drained mineral soils.  In a large pot one can tailor the soil and watering to the exact needs of this special plant.  A cactus mix, added lime and a rock mulch are all good.  But realize it does require ample water and moderate fertility while growing and flowering.  For the first few years of our experience with this plant we made the mistake of not giving it adequate food and water.  Now we know the secret to success is not to starve, but rather to feed and water as needed in potting media that has excellent drainage.