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 You are here    Flowers by the Sea / Salvias A to Z / Salvia merjamie

Salvia merjamie

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(Minty Kilimanjaro Sage) Leaf-like, fuzzy, violet bracts surround the 1-inch-long flowers of Salvia merjamie, which is native to the East African highlands from Ethiopia to Tanzania as well as Yemen and grows on Mount Kilimanjaro.
Price: $11.50
Out of stock
Common name
This is the non-scientific name used for a plant. A plant may have several common names, depending on the gardener's location. To further confuse the matter, a common name may be shared by several completely different plants. At Flowers by the Sea, we rely on the scientific name to identify our plants and avoid confusion.
Minty Kilimanjaro Sage
USDA Zones
The U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones indicate the temperature zones where a plant is likely to thrive. It is determined by the average annual winter minimum temperature. Actual winter temperatures may be higher or lower than the average.
7b - 11
Size (h/w/fh)
The anticipated mature size of the plant: Height, Width & Flower Height.
12"/24"/24"+
Exposure
This is the average amount of sunlight that a plant needs to thrive. Generally, full sun exposure is 6 or more hours of direct sun daily while partial shade is less than 4 hours of sun or dappled shade all day. Plants may tolerate more sunlight in cooler climates and need afternoon shade in extremely hot climates.
Full sun
Soil type
This is the kind of soil that a plant needs to thrive. Most plants require a well-drained soil that allows the water to soak into the soil without becoming soggy. Sandy and clay soils can be improved by digging in compost to improve drainage.
Well drained
Water needs
Plants have specific water requirements. Water loving means the plant needs regular watering to keep the soil moist. Average generally indicates applying 1 inch of water per week, or watering when the soil is dry to a depth of 3 to 4 inches. One inch of water is equal to 5 gallons per square yard of soil surface.
Average
Pot size
This is the size of the pot your plant will arrive in.
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
"Yes" indicates that this plant can be successfully grown as a container plant.
Yes
Patent #
This plant is patented, or a patent application has been filed and is pending and may not be propagated for commercial purposes under U.S. Federal Code, Title 35, Part II, Chapter 15 §161 without a license from the patent holder.
Hummingbird plant? Yes
Blue Tag Xeric
Blue Tag Plant
This plant is sensitive to overwatering and wet soils.
Details
Cultural Icons
Ratings & Reviews
Leaf-like, fuzzy, violet bracts surround the 1-inch-long flowers of Salvia merjamie, which is native to the East African highlands from Ethiopia to Tanzania as well as Yemen and grows on Mount Kilimanjaro.

Bloom time is from spring to summer. Some varieties have flowers of such a pale blue that they almost appear cream colored, whereas others have darker blue blossoms.

The pebbly, basal foliage is dark green and has finely scalloped leaves. Overall, the plant has a tidy symmetry. Growing no more than 12 to 24 inches tall and 24 inches wide, this herbaceous perennial works well for container plantings, groundcover and dry garden flowerbeds. Honeybees and hummingbirds are attracted to it. So are medical researchers who are studying the plant's potential for producing anti-microbial agents to fight bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus.

Heat tolerant, drought resistant and sun loving, this sage is found at altitudes of 6,000 to 13,000 feet in the wild. It grows in grasslands, along the edges of forests, on rocky slopes and even in cultivated fields that are lying fallow. In America, it is well acclimated to USDA Zones 7b to 11 where it grows in almost any soil that drains well. Dry conditions are okay, but it prefers regular watering.

Mint Sauce is one of its common names, because many who have smelled it say it has a strong mint aroma. The Maasai tribe appears to dislike the odor of the plant in the wild. They call it Naingungundeu, which reportedly means it smells like a rat. We like its fragrance, but don’t know enough about rats to say whether there is any au de rodent about it.