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 You are here    Flowers by the Sea / Salvias A to Z / Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O' Grady'

Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O' Grady'

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(Rosie O'Grady Mountain Sage) Honeybees and hummingbirds love the large, bright pink flowers of Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O'Grady', a drought-resistant sage. Dense and fragrant, it's large, glossy green leaves are veined and have finely serrated edges. This is a lush choice for dry gardens.

Price: $11.50
Out of stock
Common name
This is the non-scientific name used for a plant. A plant may have several common names, depending on the gardener's location. To further confuse the matter, a common name may be shared by several completely different plants. At Flowers by the Sea, we rely on the scientific name to identify our plants and avoid confusion.
Rosie O' Grady Mountain Sage
USDA Zones
The U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones indicate the temperature zones where a plant is likely to thrive. It is determined by the average annual winter minimum temperature. Actual winter temperatures may be higher or lower than the average.
7 - 9
Size (h/w/fh)
The anticipated mature size of the plant: Height, Width & Flower Height.
36"/60"/42"
Exposure
This is the average amount of sunlight that a plant needs to thrive. Generally, full sun exposure is 6 or more hours of direct sun daily while partial shade is less than 4 hours of sun or dappled shade all day. Plants may tolerate more sunlight in cooler climates and need afternoon shade in extremely hot climates.
Full sun to partial shade
Soil type
This is the kind of soil that a plant needs to thrive. Most plants require a well-drained soil that allows the water to soak into the soil without becoming soggy. Sandy and clay soils can be improved by digging in compost to improve drainage.
Well drained
Water needs
Plants have specific water requirements. Water loving means the plant needs regular watering to keep the soil moist. Average generally indicates applying 1 inch of water per week, or watering when the soil is dry to a depth of 3 to 4 inches. One inch of water is equal to 5 gallons per square yard of soil surface.
Average
Pot size
This is the size of the pot your plant will arrive in.
3 1/2 inch deep pot
Container plant?
"Yes" indicates that this plant can be successfully grown as a container plant.
Yes
Hummingbird plant? Yes
  • Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O' Grady'
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(Rosie O'Grady Mountain Sage) Honeybees and hummingbirds love the large, bright pink flowers of Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O'Grady', a drought-resistant sage. Dense and fragrant, it's large, glossy green leaves are veined and have finely serrated edges. This is a lush choice for dry gardens.

Mountain Sage sometimes is confused with its close relative Autumn Sage ( Salvia greggii). They look similar, but one apparent difference is that S. greggii has tiny, completely smooth leaves. Both species are long flowering, heat tolerant and drought resistant.

Salvia microphylla is native to the American Southwest and a number of Mexican states. In the U.S., it grows best in areas with mild winter temperatures.

Suncrest Nurseries of Watsonville, California, developed this prolific bloomer -- a lush and large variety of Mountain Sage. It's a subshrub, which means it's a shrub in warmer climates and an herbaceous perennial that dies to ground during chilly winters.

Suncrest prides itself on serendipitous discoveries in their test gardens. At FBTS, we pride ourselves on obtaining the best new Salvias on the market.

Give Salvia microphylla 'Rosie O'Grady' full sun to partial shade, well-drained soil. Although it handles dry conditions, it likes average watering based on local conditions. This sage is an ideal groundcover, because it spreads easily without being invasive. Rosie O'Grady also works well as a border or container plants.

Mountain Sages are the focus of research for their potential use in insecticides as well as medicines. Their plant chemicals contain antioxidant qualities and decrease gastrointestinal absorption of fats. We particularly appreciate them for being easy to grow, pretty plants that appeal to tiny wildlife but not to deer.