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 You are here    Flowers by the Sea / Salvias A to Z / Salvia desoleana

  Sorry, this variety is no longer available.
Here are a few other plants to consider as alternatives to Salvia desoleana:

(Wild Sage) Toothed and attractively wrinkled, the gray-green, basal foliage of Wild Sage contrasts prettily with deep lavender-to-purple flowers supported by grassy green bracts. This cold-hardy sage is native to northern Africa and parts of Asia and Europe.

$11.50

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(Mount Hermon Sage) This dry loving perennial features a tight rosette of furry white leaves, and tall branched inflorescence with white flowers and purple spots. It grows in rocky slopes on Mount Hermon in Lebanon.
$12.50

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(Blue Turkish Sage) Large velvety gray-green to white leaves in loose rosettes give this sage a distinctive look as does the celestial violet-blue of its flowers. The blossoms seem much too large for this short sage and its thin, candelabra-branched flower spikes.

$12.50

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(Greek Sage) Most of the dried culinary sage sold in the United States is Greek Sage. Frescoes on the island of Crete dated to 1400 BC depict this plant, which was used by the Phoenicians and Greeks for cooking and medicine. It is an ancient and beloved friend of mankind.

$11.50

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(Turkish Salt Sage) The common name for this plants comes from the latin halophila - salt loving. It is endemic to the central Anatolian basin in Turkey, a very diverse ecosystem of salt steppe and saline lakes. For the gardener it is a tough, hardy perennial with a most impressive floral display from early summer till fall.
$12.00

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(Two-lip Spotted Sage) Shaped like an open parrot's beak, the upper lip of this petite yet dramatic sage is lilac while the lower lip is dark violet and white with spots. The whorled flower spikes rise up from clumps of large, oval, olive green leaves with scalloped edges.
$11.50

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